New Jersey Sandy Recovery 3 Years Later

 

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New Jersey Sandy Recovery 3 Years Later

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SANDY RECOVERY 3 Y E A R S L AT E R NEW JERSEY

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NEW JERSEY SANDY RECOVERY 3 YEARS LATER 1

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My fellow New Jerseyans,   Three years ago our State changed forever. Sandy left in its wake unimaginable destruction on a scale none of us have ever endured. The storm touched families from Bergen County to the tip of Cape May. Lives lost. Tens of thousands of homes destroyed. Businesses shuttered. Roads and bridges impassable. Power out. And after the wind, and the rains and the waves subsided — when we all were able to fully appreciate the magnitude of Sandy’s impact — it was clear we would spend years on a long and arduous road to recovery.   Working together, we have made tremendous progress over the last three years. We have rebuilt thousands of homes and rental units, and we have thousands more under construction to complete. We have invested millions to support small businesses, and we continue to spur the economies of our affected communities. We are rebuilding better and stronger, moving families out of harm’s way, protecting critical infrastructure, pushing innovation and planning and preparing for future disasters. Each day we are moving forward, with a shared commitment to seeing recovery through.   While we have done much, there is still much to do. I feel the frustration, the anxiety and the fear of the families still trying to get back on their feet and the communities still in the throes of recovery. Through their perseverance, they continue to press on. Every day we are working hard to help them.   Sandy presented a tremendous challenge to our State, but New Jerseyans do not shy away from challenges. We meet them head on. It remains true that a full recovery from Sandy will take years. The road is still long and arduous. But we have come far, we will keep going forward, and we will get the job done. The spirit and resolve so unique to our State and our people will overcome Sandy. Of that there is no doubt.   Chris Christie, Governor 3

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the damage 4

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Both images of Mantoloking – Ocean County 5

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“I’ve called this experience New Jersey’s Katrina because the damage to our state is nothing that we’ve experienced ever before. . . . We have a long way to go to rebuild and restore our communities, but the people of New Jersey have already shown that we are ready to meet the challenge.” — Governor Chris Christie Both images of Belmar – Monmouth County 6

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Damage by the Numbers More than 300,000 housing units impacted, and approximately 40,500 primary residences and 15,600 rental units sustained at least $8,000 of structural damage Nearly 2.8 million households and business were Nearly 600 full or partial road closures At the height of the storm, 127 shelters were open Regional mass transit operations and infrastructure left without power serving over 7,000 residents were heavily impacted, causing system wide disruptions of NJ Transit and Path service 94 wastewater treatment plants lost power and were flooded, while 267 water systems lost power, 37 of which issued boil water advisories Hundreds of schools were closed for at least a week, some for much longer. A preliminary post-storm estimate of damage repair and resilience needs across all impacted sectors valued recovery and resilience needs in excess of $30 billion. 7

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Hoboken Dual Language Charter School (HoLa) in Hoboken — Hudson County (above) Brick — Ocean County (left) 9

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Asbury Park – Monmouth County (opposite page) Below: South Amboy – Middlesex County (below) 11

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Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission — Newark, Essex County (below) Ortley Beach – Ocean County (right) 12

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