UCGS Geo Enquirer issue 5

 

Embed or link this publication

Description

A magazine made by students for students, parents, and anyone else who may be interested in Geography

Popular Pages


p. 1

Volume 3 Issue 2

[close]

p. 2



[close]

p. 3

3-4SNOWDON 5LULWORTH 6-7NETTLECOMBE 8-9THENEWFOREST 10SCREAM 11REDEVELOPINGUCGS 12HYDROPOWERDAMS 13SLUMS

[close]

p. 4

.Squad goals at Ysbty Ifan

[close]

p. 5

Morfa Harlech for some Ecosystems and a quick paddle.

[close]

p. 6



[close]

p. 7

Ferdinand T Flag Twas a bewitching day in deepest, darkest Somerset, where the clouds rolled in through the Holford valley and the high pitched squeal of gleeful year 10 Geographers filed the air. This was the third annual Geography visit to Nettlecombe Court and despite the smaller group, there was excitement abound in a coach journey punctuated by the eclectic musical stylings of Dylan Patel and the omnipresent lookout for fast food establishments. The fieldtrip began with a meanders session in glorious sunshine near the FSC site and even with some of the best squabbling ever seen between Tanya, Taksh, Dylan and Vijay, a successful start was achieved. Everyone was able to sample the delights of proper Geographical fieldwork and it was clear that some of the group were going to get a little bit more excitable than others! Day two was a hike and a half, tracking one of Somerset’s most well known rivers, the Holford,from source to mouth. This was not without it’s peril, as Sami found out as she was engulfed by an army of giant ants. The hike saw us take in beautiful Exmoor scenery, attempt to build some dams and houses and collect some high quality to use later on in one of the classroom sessions. Each evening was a veritable cornucopia of food, games, Preet falling over and Mr Tuft laughing at Dylan. There were group tv sessions, climbing the hill to snapchat, watching the sun go down, exploring the world of GIS with the help of the tutors and even watching Mr Tuft get battered at football by Miss Buffone. The trip’s last official day was a visit to Minehad, home of Butlins and on this day, pretty much every GCSE Geography group in the South West. It was here that the group did themselves proud, not only perfecting the ability to spot fast food at 200 metres, but also honing their questionnaire and social skills by engaging members of the public in some high quality Geographical fieldwork. Even with a small group, it was clear how much each member of the group got out of surviving for themselves, making new and different mates and to paraphrase one Geographer, it was much better than being in school! I do not think there can be much higher praise than that!

[close]

p. 8

Just one of the beautiful views whilst on Geography fieldwork in Somerset

[close]

p. 9

Rana Galgal On the 18th Of June 2015 the year 9 Geography classes visited the New Forest National Park following the previous lessons we had and the different ways they are managed. My first impression of the New Forest was that it was a beautiful area with large fields containing lush vegetation that is managed well. It is located in Hampshire in the south west of England .The purpose of the trip was to experience field work and what would be expected from us in year 11 and year 10.Throughout our visit we completed a booklet which gave us a step by step guide on how to submit a high standard piece of field work. During the field trip we visited Lyndhurst which is a small town in New Forest which is a popular tourist destination for shopping or just a day out topped off with a cool ice cream. Despite the traffic congestion caused by its popularity it is quite tranquil and offers a range of places to visit from Bolton’s Bench where we did our field sketch to art galleries, cafes ,and museums. The very popular piece of literature developed into movies and studied in school, Alice in Wonderland was inspired by young Alice Liddell who is buried in Lyndhurst, at St Michael and All Angels church. We then visited Bolderwood Deer sanctuary which is a well managed honey pot site attracting tourists from far and wide to see the beautiful species of deer.Bolderwood is made up of 1500 woods and forests in England that are cared for by the Forestry Commission .We went on the Jubilee Grove trail which is a meandering route which took as past deer fields and beautiful trees of which the oldest date back to 1860.As it is well cared for we were able to enjoy the tranquillity and the cleanliness of the forest as we walked through. We used a range of different methods of data collection to test the hypothesis given which helped us develop our skills and to work as a team. It was challenging at times however by the end of the trip we all felt satisfied that we all completed our field work successfully. The skills we learned are vital as they will help us immensely in year 11 coursework. I would recommend visiting the New forest as it is beautiful and the history is quite fascinating and it is a lovely day out during summer. It is very interesting to see he deer from the viewing platform which is a structure created to help people see the deer field safely. The New Forest really is the perfect destination for you and your family as it offers many attractions that appeal to all ages.

[close]

p. 10



[close]

p. 11

Ignorantly, they asserted the policy An atrocity; an iniquity; a deed of immorality Yet I was living happily Until they stole, my baby They came silently, like the night A force with ferocious might I tried but failed, to stand and fight My hands trembled; my face turned white They snatched my girl, my little child I wept and pleaded, but they were not mild They were not gentle, but instead: beastly wild Rarely again, would I ever smile Vividly, I remember the day When they, took her away The air turned cold and the sky, bleak Vengeance, I shall wreak To abolish this law is what I dream For in my head, I still hear her Scream Arham Ansari

[close]

p. 12

In this project, we were given an aim, a budget (£1,000,000) and a hudl to sustainably redevelop an area of UCGS. It was doorstep geography! We had to redevelop an area of the school - identifying the needs of the students and staff through a questionnaire, improve the ‘financial stability’ and support ‘environmental growth’. There had to be a clear structure that consisted of a title, the aims, an introduction, a very well defined method, the results, our interpretation on the data and an analysis followed by a conclusion and evaluation. This seems like a lot, but in reality most of it is a few sentences or a graph. We also had 5 tasks to complete Open Evening (Take photos of 2 bad and 2 good areas of the school, and annotate them) In what way are the areas bad? (Collect more pictures and evidence to prove that a site should become a brownfield site) What do people want? (Questionnaire) Research (How much money can we make? Why is it sustainable?) Presentations (We could not use Prezi or powerpoint) This project had many different outcomes for different groups; there were plans to build things like libraries, sports halls and new classrooms and knock down either the huts, old canteen or girls toilets. We also had to write ‘planning permission’ and stick it on to the place that we planned to redevelop or demolish. We had to try to make it stay up as long as possible, (hide it) which was easier said than done. After doing this project, we learned that the structure can be applied to most pieces of fieldwork, but in some cases a hypothesis has to be added. Doorstep geography is great because it allows you to collect primary data from your ‘doorstep’ - which makes your fieldwork and investigations more reliable. Anika Pachu

[close]

p. 13

Many of these islands are small and isolated in an area that was once continuous rainforest in all directions. Apart from creating an artificial archipelago, the dam has also caused the complete disappearance of many vertebrates. Research (from UK Universities) has warned that such massive dams pose a huge threat of extinction to many mammals, birds and tortoises in the Amazon. It is very hard to come to a compromise, in the case of these dams, for many countries in the world. In the case of Brazil, it receives most of its energy from hydropower; or many areas across the world, therefore, like most developing countries hydropower dams pose huge positive economic benefits to people as they provide across the world, it plans to build many more new dams to meet the rising energy them with hydroelectric power and demands. Furthermore, this type of energy employment. This is particularly evident with China’s Three Gorges Dam (the world’s is very effective and important because it produces more electricity worldwide than all largest power station in terms of capacity) other renewables combined. which provided employment to 26,000 Chinese people and currently still produces The future for the Amazon rainforest is uncertain, but it is certainly threatened by 18,000 megawatts of electricity for the the proposed construction of many more country. dams/ projects: However, these colossal projects are not Maryam Khan very good news for the local wildlife as they pose countless problems. They block fish migrations, flood habitats, trap sediments and even pollute the rivers’ water, to name but a few. Especially, in the Amazon rainforest Brazil’s Balbina Dam had led to the creation of 3546 islands, due to the flooding.

[close]

p. 14

Khushi Patel Dharavi is one of the largest slums in the world, situated on the outskirts of Mumbai’s busy, ever -growing city. Many people may take one look at it and judge it as a huge dump with its vile stench inhaled into your lungs, however, it isn’t. In fact, nineteen million citizens think of it as a normal home to live in, for them it is a big recycling super hub where everything - from cans to toilet rolls and keyboards to mirrors is recycled into products that can be used over and over again. Although it seems hard to believe, the slums of Mumbai are actually helping to save our world. But how? The fact that everything in the rubbish dumps are recycled in the slums of Mumbai is very embarrassing for the UK as we waste valuable resources and just dump them in the bins, not caring where they will be taken to and what they will be turned into. As UK are aware of the shame they are being put to, all the recycling in the slums inspire western countries to recycle more too. This is evident in a quote spoken by Claire Wilton, of Friends of the Earth. The more countries that the slum inspire to recycle, the less rubbish that gets dumped into bins which can lead onto less trashing the sea and even space which definitely has a big impact on helping save the Earth. Dharavi may be one of the world’s largest slums, but it is by far its most prosperous – a thriving business centre. By recycling everything, new industries are created everyday helping the economy of India which impacts on helping save the world. Some of the industries that the slums have created include: recycling cooking oil cans for oil industries, recycling old keyboards and computer parts for technology industries, recycling soap for health industries, recycling paper and card for educational industries, etc. Slums also help companies recycle their rubbish and turn it into the same items so that they can be sold on. For example, using metal bars to bash dents out of one-gallon cooking oil cans and hammering twolitre cooking oil cans back into shape. Processing over 400 of these every day and selling them back to their original oil companies saves them a fortune and less oil gets dumped into the sea which therefore helps save the world and its natural resources. Oil companies have to spend less so more products can then be made which benefits customers and also saves the world. All the recycling in the slums also save the world from poverty as people make money. A source tells us that a worker in the slum bought his family a new bungalow and is saving up to buy a Maruti van. By slums recycling its own resources and making something out of the day-to-day objects it’s helping the economy grow more rapidly than ever with the recycling industry employing over 250,000 people and saving the world from unemployment. The slums are also stopping Mumbai choking to death on its own waste because there is so much of it and by turning it into new objects it helps cut down on waste and pollution which can save the world from global warming. So before you think that Mumbai’s slums are just piles of rubbish, take a closer look and you will see how they are helping save our world.

[close]

p. 15

Created and published by

[close]

Comments

no comments yet