2014-15 Annual Report

 

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Hope Academy Charter School 2014-15 Annual Report on Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Achievement MN Charter School District #4070 Maychy Vu, Director 720 Payne Avenue Saint Paul MN 55130 Phone: (651) 796 – 4500 Fax: (651) 796-4599 Email: maychyvu@hope-school.org Prepared by Designs for Learning, Inc. 2233 University Avenue West., Suite 450 Saint Paul, MN 55114 Phone: (651) 645-0200 Fax: (651) 645-0240 Email: aadelmann@designlearn.net

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Table of Contents Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................4 HOPE Academic Program...................................................................................................................................8 Mission and Vision ..............................................................................................................................................8 HOPE Community Academy Addresses the Purposes for Charter Schools ........................................................9 Accountability Plan Data ................................................................................................................................. 10 After School and Summer Programming ......................................................................................................... 19 Parent Involvement ......................................................................................................................................... 20 See Attachment 1 to this report for a summary of survey results. ................................................................. 21 Curriculum ....................................................................................................................................................... 21 Scheduling ....................................................................................................................................................... 23 Professional Development and Teacher Evaluation........................................................................................ 24 Teacher Evaluation .......................................................................................................................................... 25 Innovative Practices, New Initiatives, and Future Plans.................................................................................. 25 New initiatives undertaken during 2014-15 included: .................................................................................... 26 HOPE Governance and Operations ................................................................................................................ 29 Teaching Staff .................................................................................................................................................. 29 Management and Administration ................................................................................................................... 30 Director’s Professional Development Plan ...................................................................................................... 32 Strengths, Challenges and Plans for the Future .............................................................................................. 32 Challenges HOPE continues to strive to address include: ............................................................................... 33 School Enrollment and Admissions ................................................................................................................. 35 Community Connections and Partnerships ..................................................................................................... 36 Board Orientation and Training & Board Member Information ..................................................................... 36 HOPE Finances................................................................................................................................................. 37 Overview of Finances ...................................................................................................................................... 37 Internal Controls and Board Oversight ............................................................................................................ 40 Finance Award ................................................................................................................................................. 40 Audit ................................................................................................................................................................ 40 HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 2

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Attachments .................................................................................................................................................... 41 Attachment 1: HOPE Community Academy Parent Engagement Survey Results, December 2014 ............... 41 Attachment 2: HOPE Community Academy World’s Best Workforce Plan..................................................... 50 Attachment 3: HOPE Community Academy Policy for Enrollment ................................................................ 54 Attachment 4: DIBELS and Fountas & Pinnell Data Tables .............................................................................. 56 Attachment 5: Board Member & Training Information .................................................................................. 59 Attachment 6: Hmong Language and Culture Classroom Results Summary .................................................. 60 HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 3

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Executive Summary This report provides the University of Saint Thomas, families of HOPE Community Academy (HOPE), and the general public with information describing the progress of HOPE and its students during the school’s twelfth year of operation. The key findings are as follows:  Academic Goals: HOPE’s academic goals and indicators are defined in its contract with its authorizer, the University of St. Thomas. There were three Academic Goals, focusing on Adequate Yearly Progress; the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments; and the Measures of Academic Progress. o Adequate Yearly Progress Results for 2015 show HOPE Community Academy meeting targets in Participation and Attendance, but not for all student groups in Reading and Math Proficiency. In Reading Proficiency, the Limited English Proficient and Special Education groups were below the target. In Mathematics Proficiency the Special Education group was below the target. o On the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA’s), 29% of HOPE students scored proficient in Reading, as did 36% in math. o MCA growth data shows that in mathematics; 33% of students tested demonstrated high growth from 2014 to 2015; 43% demonstrated medium growth; and only 23% low growth. In Reading, 40% of students tested demonstrated high growth on this measure; 39% medium growth; and only 21% low growth. o On the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessments, just 29% of HOPE Academy grades 3-8 students tested at or above the national median for reading in the spring, as did 38% in math. However, a comparison of fall to spring results shows that of students who tested both times, 47% met or exceeded their Growth Projections in Reading, as did 52% in Mathematics. MAP norms are constructed such that nationwide, 50% of students meet Growth Projections, so HOPE remained slightly behind on the growth measure reading but exceeded the National comparison group for math. o When HOPE Academy’s Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) and non-LEP students were compared in terms of the proportion meeting and not meeting growth projections on the MAP, more of the non-LEP students met their growth projections in both subjects. See table 9 for details.  Innovative practices, program strengths and challenges, new initiatives, and future plans: o HOPE continued to utilize a number of innovative and effective practices during 2014/15, including:  Math and reading/literacy instruction scheduled for additional time daily in all grades: Students have 90 to 120 minutes of reading/literacy time, and 90-100 minutes of math daily. Math and reading are the areas of focus of HOPE Community Academy’s Record of Continuous Improvement which was updated during 2014/15 in an improvement planning process supported by specialists from the state of Minnesota’s Regional Centers of Excellence. Plan-Do-Study-Act sequences were identified, for implementation in each subject area, which support the school’s goals of increasing the proportion of students proficient in reading and in math. The implementation of Think Pair Share and Guided Reading was very successful. The LIT decided to select two new strategies for implementation in 2014/15. This year, HOPE focused on interactive teaching strategies to increase students’ use of expressive language. The school implemented the Tea Party strategy in elementary school and Post-It Palooza in middle school.  HOPE continues to enjoy strong community support; community partners assist with a number of initiatives including providing tutors, who are an important resource to support student learning at HOPE.  Implementation of the Response to Intervention approach allows for schoolwide and targeted responses to student needs in core academic areas. Implementation of RTI continued during the 2014/15 school year. The RTI program was implemented on a push-in and pull-out basis, depending on students’ needs. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 4

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   During this school year the RTI team has identified a need for more data and they have begun focusing on increasing capacity for data analysis. The use of Promethean Boards at HOPE was enhanced during the 2014/15 school year. HOPE purchased iPads for use in the classrooms and now has one iPad per student for grades 3-8. The iPads are used to interact with the Promethean Boards, displaying student work and questions, for formative assessments and classroom activities. The iPads promote student reading as well, with many students reading e-books on a regular basis. Integration of Hmong language and culture into the program, via classes attended by all students, grades K-8. Adequate support of Hmong language and culture for students was addressed during 2013/14 through enhancements to the Hmong Language and Culture class which is required of all students. A Hmong Program Coordinator was hired for the 2013/14 year and continued during the 2014/15 school year. The program has been well received and parents and students requested additions to this program. During the 2014/15 year the Hmong Language instructor has developed and included more complex and challenging instruction. There were activities around traditional crafts, music, folktales, history, and Hmong language. Hmong language standards and pre and post assessments were created, given and analyzed. Realignment of paraprofessional roles and responsibilities to ensure more focused and targeted services to at-risk students, especially students struggling with reading.     Installation of Reading Nooks in each classroom equipped with small classroom libraries, comfortable chairs, laundry baskets, blankets, pillows and e-books has resulted in increased student reading. Feedback from teachers and classroom observations show that these areas are heavily used. Professional development was offered in guided reading, which teachers have implemented fully. The literacy coach has observed classroom teachers to continue to develop their literacy skills. HOPE received an award from Merrick Community Center for community assistance efforts such as the Christmas Toy drive, National Night Out and the Return to School Backpack program. Inter-active strategies in reading, Think-Pair-Share and Tea Party, have been instrumental in getting students to share regarding how they are understanding the concepts being taught. Every teacher who teaches reading is using these strategies and they are helping with differentiation and the establishment of small groups for reading at the appropriate level. The Assistant Director monitored classroom teachers’ implementation of these strategies using a rubric designed by the school’s leadership team and the Regional Centers for Excellence liaison; this monitoring showed 84% of teachers proficient in these practices. During the 2014/15 school year the Middle School English Language Teachers and Social Studies Teacher worked together to integrate the Social Studies Benchmarks into the English Language Reading curriculum. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 5

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 For the 2015/16 school year, HOPE is considering extending school days to 4:00 pm Mondays through Thursdays, to provide additional learning time for all students. On Fridays, school would end at 2:30 p.m. o Challenges faced by HOPE during 2014/15 included:  Keeping positions consistently staffed was particularly challenging during the 2014/15 school year. This included positions in Special Education, English Learners, Mathematics, and Dean of Students. HOPE’s school social worker left and has not been replaced, and quality paraprofessionals have been difficult to find as well. Five staff members went on maternity leave during the 2014/15 school year; having one third of the teaching staff out provided challenges may have had an impact on student achievement. It is important to note, however, that the cause of staff turnover for the 2014/15 school year was due to positive reasons, e.g. staff moving to teach in a foreign country, or due to family relocation or changes in family status – not because staff were unhappy with their positions at HOPE.  Uncertainty surrounding the school’s re-authorization was stressful for the school staff. This negatively impacted school climate, until re-authorization was granted in December.  Student behavior issues during this school year provided a new challenge. A handful of students have had significant and consistent behavior issues during this school year. Developing strategies and interventions for these students provided an ongoing challenge to the staff.  HOPE continues to serve students who read well below grade level and/or have difficulty building the necessary foundational math concepts that allow them to progress through the curriculum. This ongoing challenge is being addressed by additional time for reading/literacy and mathematics; and other interventions described throughout this report. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) results in reading in the spring of 2014 showed 95% of Kindergartners at grade level, which is an encouraging result. For 2014/15 additional assessment data was collected for diagnostic and formative purposes, including the DIBELS in Math, and MAP for Primary Grades for both subjects. Data was formally analyzed 3 times during the school year, benchmarking in DIBELS and Fountas and Pinnell. Students who required intensive support were tested in DIBELS weekly and strategic students every three weeks. The teachers, Title I Reading teachers and Reading Coach analyzed the data after each assessment. On May 14th, the Leadership Implementation Team shared the MCA proficiency and growth data with the staff. New initiatives begun or planned during 2014/15 included:  Installation of reading nooks in each classroom was completed for the start of the 2014/15 school year. These include a small classroom library and ereaders which have two book subscription services on them. Students are able to access a digital library of hundreds of thousands of books. These spaces have been very successful in encouraging students to read more. Based on a suggestion made at a professional development training, the Assistant Director had laundry baskets added to the spaces. These are quite popular among middle school students who can often be seen wrapped in a blanket, sitting in the laundry basket reading.  Two new software programs were purchased to focus on math and reading instruction – Lexia Reading and IXL Math. These programs can be used on the iPads and other tablets which were bought during the 2013/14 and 2014/15 school years. In grades 3Page 6 o HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15

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         8 there is a 1 to 1 ratio of tablets to students, and students in grade 5 and up are allowed to take their tablets home after school. They typically continue to use Lexia and IXL at home. Both programs provide a teacher dashboard which shows how much time a student has spent using the program, their progress, and areas which need additional instruction. The teacher develops small group instruction based on this data to address challenging areas with students. HOPE staff identified specific instructional strategies for implementation during 2014/15, which address student and school needs in the core areas of reading and math. Plan-Do-Study-Act sequences were identified, for implementation in each subject area. Instructional Strategies or Practices, in support of HOPE’s goals for improvement of reading and math proficiency, are described in detail in HOPE’s Focus School Plan, which was most recently updated at the beginning of June 2015. The Think Pair Share Interactive Strategy was identified for implementation during 2014/15, but review of this strategy revealed that it was not as effective as hoped. New strategies were selected, Tea Party for Elementary grades, Post It Palooza and “Survey, Question, Predict, Read, Respond, Summarize” for the middle school. These strategies are currently being implemented and a review will be done on them in the summer months.. HOPE Community Academy held a data retreat, facilitated by the Regional Centers for Excellence, in the fall, followed by a second retreat at the end of the school year. During 2013/14 HOPE purchased the TIES student system. Use of the system during the 2014/15 school year has been useful for tracking assessment data, student attendance and discipline. As a result of low staffing in the EL program, the program operated differently than originally planned. The EL staff worked in the classrooms, doing observations, coaching staff, with small groups, co-taught and met with teachers to work on lesson plans. This assisted general education teachers in implementing effective teaching strategies for English Learners. As an addition to the existing music program, the school has added three music concerts, added as part of Parent Involvement nights. Art also continues as a strength, with the full time art teacher position created in 2014/15. HOPE leadership created a World’s Best Workforce plan, aligning with the new state requirement for all public school districts to explain how they are preparing students for the workforce. For the 2015/16 school year HOPE is planning to add a Girl Scouts program to complement the Boy Scouts program. Second through seventh graders were part of a pilot assessment program called Insight run by Dr. Kurt Metz. This screening identified students who are considered gifted. Once Gifted students are identified, instruction will be differentiated for them to better address their needs. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 7

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HOPE Academic Program Mission and Vision The Hmong Open Partnerships in Education (HOPE) Community Academy is a Saint Paul charter school which serves urban students in grades PreK-8. HOPE emphasizes a rigorous academic foundation with mastery of fundamental and higher-order thinking skills to prepare students for life-long learning. HOPE also instills Hmong and American values in their students. Mission Statement The mission of HOPE Community Academy is to provide students in grades K-8 with a rigorous academic foundation, focusing on the mastery of fundamental and higher-order thinking skills that prepare them for lifelong learning, while instilling in them the finest Hmong and American values. HOPE Community Academy provides quality instruction in core curriculum areas, to provide the solid academic foundation called for in the mission. Our teachers strive for excellence and are working with consultants from Minnesota’s Regional Centers of Excellence to create a Record of Continuous Improvement which identifies strategies for improving the effectiveness of instruction in specific core-academic areas. Comments from an authorizer’s review of the program during early 2013 identified the need to enhance the aspect of the mission relating to Hmong language and culture. The HOPE board initiated a plan to generate an assessment tool to assess students’ Hmong language skills (described below in the section on Strengths, Challenges and Plans for the Future), and incorporate Hmong language, culture and values schoolwide. This was carried out during the 2013/14 school year through the creation of a Hmong Program Coordinator position, who works to infuse Hmong culture into HOPE classrooms. Other elements of our efforts to live up to the school mission and vision include:  In addition to our K-8 classroom instruction of core curriculum, we have licensed teachers in the areas of Hmong language, Library, Computer Applications, Music, Art, and Physical Education. Our Middle School teachers are licensed to teach in their specific content areas. Media and Technology instruction is integrated into each content area.  During the 2014/15 school year HOPE added a Basketball program for boys and a Badminton program for girls. Currently these programs are offered as practice only, but the school plans to join competitive leagues in 2015/16.  HOPE partners with other organizations to supplement our students' learning. The East Side Learning Center continues to provide on-site one-on-one tutoring for our primary students. St. Paul Public Schools provided after-school programming at HOPE two days per week from October through May of 2015. This is a longer period of after school tutoring than has previously been offered (both academic support and enrichment). An enrichment program was added to the after school program starting in April of 2014, working in conjunction with Merrick Community Center, and this continued through 2014/15. HOPE sponsors two Boy Scout troops in which boys aged 11 to 17 may join. In addition, Middle School students participate in the school's newsletter and yearbook clubs, the Student Council, and other community service projects throughout the school year.  Finally, HOPE offers a summer school program through a partnership with the St. Paul Public Schools, which provides additional academic support to students who are behind. This summer, the summer program is being offered to any student who would like to attend. HOPE is partnering with the Merrick Community Center HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 8

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or other summer programs. The summer school program went for 4 weeks, 5 days a week. Last year, around 175 students attended summer school. HOPE Community Academy Addresses the Purposes for Charter Schools The primary purpose of charter schools in Minnesota is to improve pupil learning and student achievement. HOPE Community Academy strives to do this through the provision of a rigorous academic program with high expectations, as described throughout this report. See in particular the Accountability Plan Data section for evidence of success in improving pupil learning; and the Innovative Practices, New Initiatives, and Future Plans section for discussion of improvement initiatives currently underway. Of the five additional purposes for charter schools in Minnesota, HOPE Community Academy is currently focusing strongly on the one to measure learning outcomes and create different and innovative forms of measuring outcomes. HOPE has established common assessments at each grade level, depending on students’ readi ng level; and teachers analyze data from these assessments, using it to inform instruction. Also, HOPE Community Academy’s updated Record of Continuous Improvement (formerly the School Improvement Plan) specifies instructional strategies now being implemented schoolwide, which include innovative processes for measurement of learning outcomes. There are two instructional strategies: using questioning to extend student thinking (employed in both reading and math); and Gradual Release (“I do,” “We do,” “You do”) in reading. Both strategies include a Plan-Do-Study-Act sequence; the Study element specifies innovative strategies to measure outcomes. In the case of the questioning to extent student thinking, Professional Learning Community (PLC) teams study student outcomes weekly based on sample lessons, then identify and schedule student intervention groups based on benchmark percent of mastery data. In the alignment of curricula to the state standards, the PLC teams discuss the use of standards as a baseline; utilize a Data Day to examine common benchmark assessment results; and identify and schedule student intervention groups based on benchmark percent of mastery data. See the Innovative Practices, New Initiatives, and Future Plans section below for details. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 9

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Accountability Plan Data HOPE Community Academy’s Accountability Plan for 2014/15 remained the same as for the previous year. The Accountability Plan includes three sets of Academic Goals with multiple measurements and indicators of success, as well as two Non-Academic Goals, which are summarized in Table 1 below. Table 1: HOPE Accountability Plan Academic Goals AYP Goal: HOPE Community Academy students will meet the requirements of AYP under the No Child Left Behind Act MCA-II Goal Series:  Proficiency: UST-authorized charter schools should perform as well as or better than the state, the district where the school, resides, and schools with comparable demographics  Growth: Student growth on the MCA-II over time is at least comparable to growth of students in the state, the district, and schools with comparable demographics Measurements State-determined annual Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) targets Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments Series II (MCA’s):Reading and Mathematics (Grades 3-8 for Proficiency; Grades 4-8 for Growth) Indicators of Success Meeting AYP in all areas (Participation and Proficiency for Reading and Mathematics; Attendance)  Proficiency: Percent of students that meet or exceed expectations compared to the average: o Statewide o In the resident district o In comparable schools Growth: o Percent of students that made low, medium, and high growth o Percent of students who are proficient with medium and high growth and not proficient with high growth compared to the percent of students in the same groups:  Statewide  In the resident district  In comparable schools National Median: Percent at or above national medians (at least 50% to meet target) RIT Growth: Percent meeting RIT growth projection1 (at least 50% to meet target)  NWEA Goal Series:  National Median: USTauthorized schools should perform better than the national median  RIT Growth: UST-authorized schools have students that grow at the same rate or better than at least 50 percent of the schools tested nationally Special Needs Populations Academic Expectations: For special education or English Learner student populations, if 1 Northwest Evaluation Association’s Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessments in Reading and Mathematics (Grades 2-8)   Northwest Evaluation Association’s Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) as-   Participation: Number and percent who completed fall and spring MAP tests in each category RIT Growth: Percent meeting RIT growth Language in the Accountability Plan references “growth goals;” however, with the change to 2011 norms, NWEA now uses the term “projection” for the typical RIT score growth amount. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 10

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Academic Goals either exceeds 20% of the school’s total student population. Measurements sessments in Reading and Mathematics (Grades 2-8) Specific to the goal Measurements Attendance rate for the school year ((ADA/ADM)*100) Parent survey results Indicators of Success projection, compared to other students School Specific Academic Goals Non-Academic Goals Attendance: Each school will meet or exceed its attendance rate goal for Adequate Yearly Progress Parent Satisfaction: Each school shall survey its parents annually and report on the level of parent satisfaction with the school. Specific to the goal Indicators of Success Percent-of-attendance more than 90% or improves by at least 0.1% over the previous year At least 80% of parents surveyed are satisfied with the school The Goals and Indicators are stated below, along with HOPE academic results data from the 2014/15 school year. The indicators for each goal are organized into a four-point rubric, scored as: 4 – Exceeds standard 3 – Meets standard 2 – Approaching standard 1 – Does not meet standard. AYP Goal: HOPE Community Academy students will meet the requirements of AYP under the No Child Left Behind Act as established by federal and state law. Failure to meet AYP for three consecutive years will automatically result in the school being placed on intervention with the University of St. Thomas . Adequate Yearly Progress Results for 2015 show HOPE Community Academy meeting targets in Participation and Attendance but not meeting the targets for all student groups in Reading and Math Proficiency. In Reading Proficiency, The Limited English Proficient and Special Education groups were below the target. In Math Proficiency the Special Education group was below the target. Other groups met AYP Proficiency targets via Safe Harbor Adjustments. Note: Under the state’s waiver of federal Title I requirements, the Adequate Yea rly Progress (AYP) system is being de-emphasized, and its place taken by a Multiple Measurements Rating system consisting of four measurements: Proficiency, Student Growth, Achievement Gap Reduction, and Graduation Rate (for high schools). Proficiency is measured in terms of the proportion of students testing at the Meeting or Exceeding Expectations level on the spring MCA’s; Student Growth and Achievement Gap Reduction consider changes in MCA scores for students testing two consecutive years at a given school. However, Adequate Yearly Progress measures are still calculated. MCA-II Goal Series MCA-II Proficiency: UST-authorized charter schools should perform as well as or better than the state, the district where the school, resides, and schools with comparable demographics (schools in the same region that serve similar populations of students, as defined by socioeconomic and minority status). Schools will work with UST annually to determine 3-5 comparable school(s). MCA-II proficiency will be measured on a school-wide level. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 11

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Indicator MCA-II: Reading Percent of students that meet or exceed expectations compared to the average:  Statewide  In the resident district  In comparable school(s) MCA-II: Math Percent of students that meet or exceed expectations compared to the average:  Statewide  In the resident district  In comparable school(s) 4 Meets or exceeds the comparison group by more than 5 percentage points Meets or exceeds the comparison group by more than 5 percentage points 3 Within 5 percentage points of comparison group 2 6-10 percentage points below the comparison group 1 More than 10 percentage points below the comparison group Within 5 percentage points of comparison group 6-10 percentage points below the comparison group More than 10 percentage points below the comparison group The tables below summarize MCA proficiency data from spring 2015. Table 2: MCA-II/III Reading Proficiency at HOPE, Spring 2015 Percent Meeting or Exceeding on MCA III Reading 2014-2015 School Year2 # of Students Percent Percent ExTested Meeting ceeding Grade 3 50 22% Grade 4 51 18% 2% Grade 5 44 34% 5% Grade 6 36 33% 8% Grade 7 39 18% 8% Grade 8 47 32% Overall 267 26% 3% Table 3: MCA-/III Math Proficiency at HOPE, Spring 2015 Percent Meeting or Exceeding on MCA II/III Math 2014-2015 School Year # of Students Percent Percent ExTested Meeting ceeding Grade 3 50 36% 2% Grade 4 51 25% 5% Grade 5 44 22% Grade 6 36 36% 5% Grade 7 39 20% 15% Grade 8 47 44% 8% Overall 267 31% 5% 2 October 1-enrolled students only. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 12

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MCA-II Growth: Student level data are available to measure a student’s growth on the MCA -II over time, if the student is continuously enrolled in a school. For more information on the MCA-II growth data go to the Minnesota Department of Education’s website. MCA-II growth data will be analyzed on a school-wide level. Indicator MCA-II: Reading Percent of students that made low, medium, and high growth MCA-II: Math Percent of students that made low, medium, and high growth 4 Low growth was less than 20% AND high growth was more than 35% Low growth was less than 20% AND high growth was more than 35% 3 High growth percentage exceeds low growth percentage High growth percentage exceeds low growth percentage 2 Low growth percentage exceeds high growth percentage Low growth percentage exceeds high growth percentage 1 High growth is less than 20% AND low growth is more than 30% High growth is less than 20% AND low growth is more than 30% The tables below summarize MCA growth data from spring 2015. Table 4: MCA-II/III Reading Growth at HOPE, Spring 2014 – Spring 2015 Percent Growth on MCA II/III Reading, SY 2013-14 # of Students % In Each Category* %Not Prof, High Growth 70 33.3% %Not Prof, Med. Growth 61 29.0% %Not Prof, Low Growth 37 17.6% %Prof, High Growth 13 6.2% %Prof, Med. Growth 21 10.0% %Prof, Low Growth 8 3.8% TOTAL 210 *May not add to 100% due to independent rounding. Overall, 39.5% of HOPE students with MCA Growth data in Reading showed high growth, and 21.4% showed low growth. This puts the school at level 3, Meets Standard, for this measure. These results represent a significant improvement over the previous school year: spring 2014 MCA results showed only 19.6% of students tested making high growth in Reading, and 34.9% showing low growth. The Record of Continuous Improvement focuses on reading and mathematics; specific action steps for improvement in reading are outlined below, in the Innovative Practices, New Initiatives and Future Plans section. Professional development topics also continue to focus largely on reading (see Professional Development and Teacher Evaluation, below). HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 13

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Table 5: MCA-II/III Math Growth at HOPE, Spring 2014 – Spring 2015 Percent Growth on MCA II/III Math, SY2013-2014 # of Students % In Each Category* %Not Prof, High Growth 49 23.4% %Not Prof, Med. Growth 55 26.3% %Not Prof, Low Growth 30 14.4% %Prof, High Growth 23 11.0% %Prof, Med. Growth 34 16.3% %Prof, Low Growth 18 8.6% TOTAL 209 *May not add to 100% due to independent rounding. Overall, 34.4% of HOPE students with MCA Growth data in Math showed high growth, and 23.0% showed low growth. This puts the school at level 3, Meets Standard, for this measure. These results represent a small improvement over the previous school year: spring 2014 results showed 33% of students making high growth in Math on this measure, and 28% making low growth. Along with reading, mathematics performance remains an area of concern for HOPE leadership as the majority of students remain non-proficient. Strategies to improve in math are articulated in the Record of Continuous Improvement and are supported via ongoing staff training. NWEA Goal Series National Median: Percentages established for the national median goal compares the school’s progress with others across the country and are based on the expectations that UST-authorized schools perform better than the national median. For example, at least 50 percent of students in each grade should perform above the NWEA national median score for that grade level. Indicator NWEA MAP in Reading: Percent at or above national medians NWEA MAP in Math: Percent at or above national medians 4 More than 65% More than 65% 3 50-65% 50-65% 2 40-49% 40-49% 1 Less than 40% Less than 40% The table below summarizes the proportion of HOPE students at or above the national median based on spring 2015 MAP test results. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 14

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Table 6: NWEA MAP Levels of Achievement at HOPE, Spring 2015 NWEA % At or Above National Median – Reading Students Tested, Spring Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Overall 71 54 52 44 36 43 47 347 % At or Above National Median 28% 28% 21% 23% 33% 28% 43% 29% # At or Above National Median 20 15 11 10 12 12 20 100 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Overall NWEA % At or Above National Median – Math Students Tested, Spring 70 54 52 44 36 42 47 345 % At or Above National Median 44% 37% 31% 23% 61% 29% 43% 38% # At or Above National Median 31 20 16 10 22 12 20 131 These National Median results from the spring 2015 MAP tests show HOPE Community Academy at level 1, Does not meet standard, in Reading, and at level 1, Does not meet standard in Mathematics. Overall results are slightly lower than spring 2014, when 35.5% of students tested scored at or above the National Median in reading, and 41.5% were at or above the median in math. RIT Growth: Percentages established for the RIT growth goal3 are based on the expectation that UST-authorized schools have students that grow at the same rate or better than at least 50 percent of the schools tested nationally. For example, if 65 percent of the school’s students meet their RIT growth goal, then the school is performing with the top 25 percent of schools, nationally. If 40 percent of the school’s students meet their RIT growth goals, then the school is performing with the bottom 25 percent of schools, nationally. Indicator NWEA MAP in Reading: Percent meeting RIT growth goal NWEA MAP in Math: Percent meeting RIT growth goal 4 More than 65% (ranked in first quartile) More than 65% (ranked in first quartile) 3 50-65% (ranked in second quartile) 50-65% (ranked in second quartile) 2 40-49% (ranked in third quartile) 40-49% (ranked in third quartile) 1 Less than 40% (ranked in fourth quartile) Less than 40% (ranked in fourth quartile) The table below shows growth in MAP score results for students who tested both fall and spring. 3 The Northwest Evaluation Association now uses the term “Growth Projection” rather than “Growth Goal,” in recognition of the fact that the projected post-test score may or may not be an appropriate goal for any given student. The growthprojection score is based on the initial score and is simply the median post-test score for students with that initial score. MAP norms are constructed such that nationwide, 50% of students are meeting Growth Projections. HOPE Community Academy Annual Report for 2014-15 Page 15

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