2006 New Jersey Office of the Attorney General Annual Report

 

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2006 New Jersey Office of the Attorney General Annual Report

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2006 Annual Report Stuart Rabner, Attorney General of New Jersey

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Dear Governor Corzine, members of the State Legislature and citizens of New Jersey: Through its unique, dual role as the state’s chief law enforcement agency and primary legal advisor to state government, the Department of Law and Public Safety touches the lives of virtually all New Jersey citizens. Staffed by approximately 9,500 employees working in 10 divisions, the Department has a diverse and vital mission that includes responsibility for protecting communities, enforcing criminal and civil laws, defending state statutes and providing legal representation to state agencies. In 2006, the Department pursued its mission on many fronts, with highlights including the launch of a comprehensive, statewide effort to reduce violent street gang activity and related drug trafficking, the use of technology to create state-of-the-art disaster management systems, and a vigorous campaign to identify and prosecute public corruption. Among the significant gains for state law enforcement in 2006 was the “Nine Trey” sweep, a major investigative attack on gang activity. State Police, working in cooperation with local and federal authorities, arrested more than 60 members of the so-called “Nine Trey” gang, a violent subset of the Bloods operating in cities throughout New Jersey. The Nine Trey sweep was the largest single gang sweep operation in state law enforcement history, and was the culmination of an 11-month investigation. As a result of the effort, members and associates of the Nine Trey gang were charged with conspiracy, extortion, drug dealing and weapons traffic. Meanwhile, through a $750,000 state appropriation, our antigun-violence initiative Operation Ceasefire continued to grow in 2006. Operation Ceasefire is a collaborative effort among law enforcement, community groups, and prosecutors to directly confront the problem of gun violence by stopping the next shooting. By mid-2007, we anticipate that the program will be fully operational in Newark/Irvington, Camden, Paterson, Trenton and Plainfield. Among the Department’s noteworthy public corruption cases in 2006 was Operation Slapshot, an investigation into illegal sports gambling by the Division of Criminal Justice and State Police that resulted in charges filed against a veteran New Jersey State Trooper, a former Philadelphia Flyers hockey player, and a resident of Gloucester County. The State Trooper, James Harney, ultimately resigned his position and pleaded guilty in August 2006 to gambling-related criminal charges. 6 0 The Gloucester county resident, James Ulmer, pleaded guilty to criminal charges in December 2006. As of year’s end, Slapshot-related criminal charges remained pending against former Philadelphia Flyers hockey star Rick Tocchet. Investigators found that, during one 40-day period alone, the Philadelphia-South-Jersey betting ring took in $1.7 million in illegal sports wagers. The Division of Criminal Justice also prosecuted a former official of the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs in 2006 for allegedly stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Union County Homelessness Prevention Program. The Prevention Program makes rent money available to eligible persons and families to help them avoid homelessness. Former program field representative Robin Wheeler Hicks pleaded guilty in March 2006 to bribery and theft charges, acknowledging that she submitted at least 428 false applications to the program totaling $866,560. Eight other people and four corporations have also pleaded guilty in the case. 1

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety In another widely-reported public corruption case in 2006, Attorney General Stuart Rabner announced the indictment of former Carney’s Point Township (Salem County) Mayor John “Mack” Lake on charges of official misconduct and bribery. Lake was charged in the indictment with offering a political opponent municipal government jobs in return for the opponent dropping his campaign for election to the township committee. Meanwhile, work continued toward creating a new, state-of-the-art Regional Operations and Intelligence Center (ROIC) in 2006. Referred to as “The Rock,” the Regional Operations and Intelligence Center is located on the site of State Police Division Headquarters and will cost approximately $28 million – all of it state funding. Managed by the New Jersey State Police, the ROIC features state-of-the-art information technology and will serve as the state’s official Emergency Operations Center when there is a natural disaster, an elevated homeland security threat level or other significant emergency. The ROIC is a disaster response hub for the future – a facility that can best inform decision-makers who are dealing with emergencies related to all types of hazard, from natural disaster to terrorist attack to flu pandemic and beyond. The ROIC also serves as a law enforcement intelligence data hub serving the state’s anti-gang and anti-gun-violence efforts. As of year’s end, the New Jersey Office of Insurance Fraud Prosecutor (OIFP) had obtained 175 criminal convictions, and OIFP prosecutions had resulted in the sentencing of 18 defendants to state prison. Total criminal fines and penalties imposed as a result of OIFP prosecutions in 2006 topped $124,000 for the year, and civil fines and penalties relative to Medicaid-fraud-related cases totaled approximately $848,000. In one auto fraud case, the OIFP obtained an indictment charging a Pennsylvania man with multiple criminal counts related to the sale of stolen automobiles. Overall, the investigation uncovered a conspiracy to steal $1 million or more through vehicle thefts and phony insurance company claims. If convicted, defendant Arthur Lipinski of Bethlehem, Pa., faces up to 10 years in state prison. As of year’s end, the investigation was continuing. The Department also acted to protect the environment in 2006 through a variety of criminal prosecutions and civil lawsuits. On the criminal front, innovative use of New Jersey’s criminal assault statute by the Department resulted in a guilty plea to assault charges by the exterminating firm Terminex International, and an agreement by the company to pay $300,000 to the state’s School Integrated Pest Management Program. (The program is a legislatively-mandated effort aimed at reducing or eliminating pesticide use in school settings. ) Terminex pleaded guilty to assault in connection with a botched cocoa bean fumigation effort at a warehouse in Pennsauken, Camden County. State investigators who reviewed the incident found that the fumigation represented a gross misapplication of the chemical compound methyl bromide, and that all safety requirements for protective equipment and air testing had been ignored. Terminex agreed to pay the state $80 million as part of a civil settlement related to the fumigation mishap. The Department’s Division of Law was a participant in those settlement negotiations. In another environmental prosecution by the Division of Criminal Justice, two managers for United Water Toms River Inc., George Flegal and Richard Ottens Jr., were indicted in 2006 on charges of tampering with public records and falsifying records for allegedly manipulating a water source during water quality testing. The two defendants are accused of trying to conceal the actual level of contaminants in the drinking water supplied by United Water. Civilly, actions by the Division of Law in 2006 recovered a total of $10.8 million in past environmental cleanup costs, and more than $1.2 million in natural resource damages for the year. In addition, the Division played a significant role in a series of multi-state lawsuits challenging the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s recent weakening of federal Clean Air Act regulations, and engaged in litigation to challenge EPA’s attempt to exempt power plants from stringent controls on potentially harmful mercury emissions. Meanwhile, the Division of Consumer Affairs continued to vigorously enforce the state’s consumer protection laws in 2006 while also continuing its outreach efforts aimed at 2

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helping consumers – particularly senior citizens, who are a frequent target of fraud — to avoid being victimized by unscrupulous contractors, phony sales pitches, too-good-to-betrue investment opportunities and other scams. Among other significant actions, the Division filed lawsuits against two major drugstore retail chains — Rite Aid and Duane Reade — alleging that both charged more than the posted price for certain products, and that both sold products that were past the manufacturer’s expiration date, including infant formula, baby food and non-prescription drugs. The Division on Civil Rights demonstrated its ongoing commitment to combating discrimination – and its agility in adjusting to changing societal trends – by prosecuting several cases in 2006 in which landlords had advertised their intention to discriminate via the Internet, then reiterated their discriminatory policies while speaking directly with stateemployed “testers.” In all but one case, landlords who were prosecuted had advertised their refusal to rent to children and/or would-be tenants using federal Section 8 rental assistance via a popular Internet site, www.Craigslist.org. These are just a sampling of the Department of Law and Public Safety’s keynote actions and initiatives for 2006. In the pages that follow, there is much more to learn about the Department’s Divisions of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Civil Rights, Consumer Affairs, Criminal Justice, Elections, Gaming Enforcement, Highway Traffic Safety, Law and State Police, as well as the New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission and the New Jersey Racing Commission. Through enforcement actions, litigation, legal advice, regulatory oversight, policy initiatives, grants to local jurisdictions, awareness forums and other outreach, each of these agencies served to improve the quality of life of New Jersey residents in 2006. Dovetailing with extensive and varied efforts to protect New Jersey residents in 2006 was a commitment by the Attorney General to keep them as informed as possible regarding Law-and-Public-Safety-related developments by making the Department’s Internet Web pages as user-friendly as possible. Extensive planning went into a ground-up redesign of the OAG Web site that began in early 2006 and continued throughout the year. Careful attention was given to “transparency” between the Department’s various divisions and commissions while preserving their unique identities. The new design employed consistent and clear navigation from one division to another. As a result, each division became only a “click” away, since the new design displayed a list of every division on each page. The new design was “modular,” allowing divisions to easily promote and trade space for important programs or upcoming events in much the same way that advertising space would work on a commercial Web site. First out of the gate with redesigns in 2006 were the top-level OAG pages, as well as pages devoted to the Division of Criminal Justice, the Help America Vote Act, and the Office of the Insurance Fraud Prosecutor. The balance of the Department’s divisional Web page redesigns were to debut in 2007. New Jersey is a heavily-traveled “corridor” state, a center for international shipping and air travel, a hub for education, industry and commerce, and a global destination for tourism and legalized gaming. Moreover, New Jersey is home to more than 8 million people, and its population is among the most diverse in the nation. Protecting a state as complex and multi-faceted as New Jersey is a significant challenge, but the Department of Law and Public Safety remains committed to meeting that challenge, today and in the future. 6 0 Stuart Rabner Attorney General 3

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety 4

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Table of Contents Division of Criminal Justice .......................................................... 6 Division of State Police ................................................................ 10 Division of Law ........................................................................... 14 Division on Civil Rights .............................................................. 18 Division of Comsumer Affairs .................................................... 22 Division of Gaming Enforcement ............................................... 26 Racing Commission .................................................................... 30 Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control ...................................... 34 Division of Highway Traffic Safety ............................................... 38 Juvenile Justice Commission ....................................................... 42 Division of Elections ....................................................................46 6 0 5

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety Division of Criminal Justice New Jersey’s unified, integrated system of law enforcement is unique in the nation. The Criminal Justice Act of 1970 designated the Attorney General as the chief law enforcement officer of the state. The Division of Criminal Justice, on behalf of the Attorney General, is charged with responsibility to enforce the criminal laws of the state and serve a variety of functions pertaining to the administration of criminal justice. It is the goal of the Division to help coordinate law enforcement efforts and resources at all levels – state, county and municipal – to ensure the safety and security of all New Jersey citizens. 6

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Division of Criminal Justice Key Initiatives Division Reorganization — At the close of 2006, Attorney General Rabner and Director Gregory A. Paw announced a reorganization of the Division of Criminal Justice to direct greater resources to two top priorities: public corruption and gangs. The reorganization, which allows more flexibility in assigning investigators and attorneys, reflects strategies initiated in 2006 to focus efforts on those complex, labor-intensive cases. The reorganization consolidated 21 units into seven. In particular, 14 smaller trial units were consolidated into three major crime-fighting groups: Corruption, Gangs/Organized Crime, and Major White Collar Crimes. Three other units – the Office of Insurance Fraud Prosecutor, Appeals, and Prosecutors Supervision – remained in existing form, while a new Fiscal Oversight unit for Schools Construction Corporation matters absorbed much of the former Office of Government Integrity. The reorganized major crimes section consolidated eight different sections that had been dealing with white collar and financial crimes, including the environmental crimes bureau, computer crimes, money laundering and labor offenses. Other Public Corruption Prosecutions— The Division charged 22 other public officials with crimes in 2006 for alleged corrupt activities, including bribery, theft of public funds and selling driver’s licenses and other official forms of identification to unauthorized persons. In November, Attorney General Rabner announced the indictment of former Carney’s Point Mayor John “Mack” Lake on charges of official misconduct and bribery for allegedly offering municipal jobs to a political opponent on the condition that the opponent drop out of the race for township committee. In an unrelated case, the Division successfully prosecuted Robin Wheeler-Hicks, a former senior field representative for the Department of Community Affairs, for allegedly stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Union County Homelessness Prevention Program. The program provides rent money to eligible individuals and families to help them avoid homelessness. Wheeler-Hicks pleaded guilty in March 2006 to bribery and theft charges, admitting she submitted at least 428 false applications to the program totaling $866,560. Eight other people and four corporations ha The Division also obtained indictments in 2006 against the director of the state Division of Taxation, the deputy director and four other state managers on charges related to their alleged acceptance of thousands of dollars worth of illegal gifts from a vendor, including dinners, entertainment, golf outings and spa treatments. The gifts were provided by officers of OSI Collection Services Inc., a company contracted by the State to collect unpaid taxes. Also indicted were a former OSI sales director who managed the state contracts and a former OSI vice president for sales. 6 0 Operation Slapshot/Corrupt Trooper Prosecution— As the result of an investigation by the State Police and Division of Criminal Justice into a multi-million dollar illegal sports bookmaking operation, veteran State Trooper James Harney was forced to resign and pleaded guilty on August 3, 2006 to conspiracy, official misconduct and promoting gambling. Another participant, James A. Ulmer of Swedesboro, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and promoting gambling on Dec. 1, 2006. Charges remained pending against former Philadelphia Flyers player Rick Tocchet. Investigators found that during one 40-day period alone, the betting ring took in more than 1,000 bets totaling $1.7 million. 7

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety Fighting Gangs— In July 2006, the Division of Criminal Justice and the State Police, working in cooperation with local and federal authorities, carried out the largest single gang sweep in state law enforcement history, arresting more than 60 members of the Nine Trey street gang. “Operation Nine Connect” targeted top leaders of Nine Trey, which has been identified as the most violent set of the Bloods operating in New Jersey. The gang members were charged with racketeering, extortion and drug and weapons trafficking. In a related development, the State Police and Division of Criminal Justice arrested Atlantic City recording studio owner John “Johnny Hooks” Abbey in November 2006 on charges of first-degree racketeering conspiracy for allegedly laundering more than $100,000 for Nine Trey. The arrest marked a significant break in unraveling how Nine Trey funds its illegal operations. Also, through a $750,000 state appropriation, the anti-gun-violence initiative Operation Ceasefire continued to grow in 2006. Operation Ceasefire is a collaborative effort among law enforcement, community groups, and prosecutors to directly confront the problem of gun violence – much of which is gang-related — by stopping the next shooting. By mid-2007, it is anticipated that the program will be fully operational in Newark/Irvington, Camden, Paterson, Trenton and Plainfield. “give ups.” One case involved the illegal duplication of ignition keys and the fencing of stolen cars on eBay. OIFP recovered more than 150 stolen high-end vehicles worth more than $3 million. In other high-profile cases, OIFP convicted former Camden police officer Jerome Bollettieri at trial on charges he sold police accident reports to a retired Camden officer so runners could illegally solicit individuals for chiropractic treatments. In another OIFP trial victory, former pharmacy manager Verona Boodram and former pharmacy technician Alpha Bangoura were convicted of enticing HIV/AIDS patients to sell their medications back to Ojah Pharmacy in East Orange so the defendants could fraudulently bill Medicaid for prescriptions never dispensed. Boodram was sentenced to five years in prison, and Bangoura to six and one-half years. Other Significant Division Cases Rosa Victoria Rivera of Lyndhurst, her boyfriend, John Arturo Perez Silva, and her son, Wilson Armondo Pinos Rivera, were arrested in December 2006 and charged with stealing $827,000 by filing 540 fraudulent state tax returns. Mack Barden of Paterson was indicted in July 2006 on charges that he stole $210,000 by filing fraudulent state tax refund and homestead rebate claims. He pleaded guilty to second-degree theft by deception. New Africa Day Care Center Inc., formerly located on South Orange Avenue in Newark; its executive director, Muslimah Suluki of College Park, Georgia; her son, Robert Parish of Neptune; and her ex-husband, Mahdi Suluki were indicted in June 2006 on theft and other charges for allegedly diverting more than $200,000 in state funding from the day care center for personal use. Frances Portlock, the former director of operations for the South Amboy Housing Authority, and Colleen Middleton, the former Section Eight coordinator for the Old Bridge Office of Insurance Fraud Prosecutor— In 2006, OIFP charged 220 defendants and sent defendants to jail for a total of 81 years. Indictments were up 30 percent from 2005, and accusations were up 25 percent. OIFP obtained restitution orders totaling nearly $35 million and imposed 1,263 civil sanctions. OIFP secured a major victory in a New Jersey Supreme Court decision that reversed the lower courts and held that the burden of proof in civil insurance fraud actions is the preponderance of the evidence standard, not the higher clear and convincing standard. OIFP dismantled several large auto theft rings in 2006, some of which operated out of car dealerships and solicited owners to turn over cars and file false theft claims in 8

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Division of Criminal Justice Township Housing Authority pleaded guilty to official misconduct in December 2006 for stealing a total of $91,000 from two publicly funded rental assistance programs. Each woman was sentenced to three years in prison. Two former clerks at the Morristown Motor Vehicle Commission agency, Tressa V. Schumacher and Trucinder “Trudy” Clark, pleaded guilty in April 2006 to conspiracy to commit official misconduct for selling driver’s licenses to unauthorized persons. Each woman was sentenced to five years in prison. Former Newark police officer Brandy Johnson pleaded guilty in September 2006 to selling cocaine and hindering law enforcement efforts to arrest her boyfriend, who also was dealing narcotics. She was sentenced to seven years in state prison. Charles “Black” Hamilton of Irvington, the former leader of a violent heroin cartel operating in Mercer and Essex counties, was convicted at trial in October 2006 of first-degree charges of conspiracy, racketeering and drug distribution. In related cases involving the cartel, Robert Cashwell of Elizabeth was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to first-degree distribution of heroin, and Akeem Blue of Trenton was sentenced to 17 years in prison after pleading guilty to possession of heroin with intent to distribute and additional charges filed by the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office. In October 2006, Diane M. Oakley of Cream Ridge was convicted at trial of attempted murder and conspiracy, both in the first degree, for attempting to hire an undercover state trooper as a hit man to kill her ex-husband. She was sentenced to 10 years in state prison. Six North Jersey men and one Pennsylvania man were indicted in January 2006 on charges they operated a multi-state coupon redemption fraud scheme that netted $580,000 in illegal profits. All of the defendants pleaded guilty to theft by deception. Four family members from Point Pleasant Beach were sentenced to state prison in 2006 for illegally obtaining hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and luxury merchandise through various mortgage, real estate, bank fraud and identity theft schemes. The family members used Atlantic City casinos to launder their illegal proceeds. The defendants were sentenced as follows: Robert Issa was sentenced in May to 13 years in prison; Roger Issa was sentenced in May to 10 years; Antwan Issa was sentenced in June to eight and one-half years; and Rita Issa was sentenced in July to three years. A joint investigation by the Division of Criminal Justice - Environmental Crimes Bureau and the New Jersey DEP Pesticide Control Program led to a guilty plea in October 2006 from Terminix International to a criminal charge of assault related to a botched cocoa-bean fumigation that exposed nine employees in a Pennsauken warehouse to the highly toxic pesticide methyl bromide in 2004. Under the plea agreement, Terminix agreed to pay $300,000 to the School Integrated Pest Management Program, a legislatively mandated program to train those responsible for pest management in public and private schools across New Jersey how to reduce or eliminate pesticide use in compliance with state law to avoid exposing students and staff. Two managers for United Water Toms River Inc., George Flegal and Richard Ottens Jr., were indicted in June 2006 on charges of tampering with public records and falsifying records for allegedly manipulating a water source during water quality testing in order to conceal the actual level of contaminants in the drinking water they supplied. 6 0 9

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety Division of State Police Founded in 1921, the New Jersey State Police is a diverse agency with a broad-based and evolving law enforcement mission. The State Police is charged with ensuring the safety of the general public by providing and maintaining statewide police services including those related to homeland security, general highway and traffic safety, criminal investigation and enforcement, intelligence gathering, forensic science and laboratory services, emergency medical transport, disaster management, support of local law enforcement efforts and maintenance of criminal records and identification systems. As a means of most efficiently carrying out its mission, the State Police is organized into three branches – Administrative, Homeland Security and Investigations. The Investigations Unit has been segmented into three Organized Crime Control Bureaus – each made up of a Street Gang Unit, Drug Trafficking Unit and Organized Crime Unit. These three anti-crime bureaus employ what is known as an Intelligence-Led Policing Model (ILP) — to more effectively target official corruption, illegal drug distribution and violent street gang activity throughout New Jersey. More information on the State Police is available at www.njsp.org. 10

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Division of State Police Investigations Branch Highlights Major Sweep of ‘Nine Trey’ Gang— In 2006 the State Police, working in cooperation with local and federal authorities, arrested more than 60 members of the Nine Trey street gang, a violent subset of the Bloods operating in cities throughout New Jersey. The Nine Trey sweep was the largest single gang sweep operation in state law enforcement history, and was the culmination of an 11-month investigation. As a result of the effort, members and associates of the Nine Trey gang were charged with racketeering, conspiracy to commit murder, extortion, drug dealing and weapons offenses. In a related development, State Police arrested Atlantic-City-based recording studio owner John “Johnny Hooks” Abbey in November 2006 on charges of first-degree racketeering conspiracy for allegedly laundering more than $100,000 in money for the Nine Trey gang. The arrest marked a significant break in unraveling how Nine Trey funds its illegal operations. Operation Slapshot— As the result of a cooperative investigation by the State Police and Division of Criminal Justice into a multi-million-dollar illegal sports gambling ring, veteran New Jersey State Trooper James Harney was forced to resign in 2006. Former Trooper Harney subsequently pleaded guilty, in August 2006, to charges of conspiracy, official misconduct and promoting gambling. Another defendant, James A. Ulmer of Swedesboro, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and promoting gambling in December 2006. Charges remained pending against former Philadelphia Flyers hockey player Rick Tocchet. Investigators found that during one 40-day period alone, the betting ring took in more than 1,000 bets totaling $1.7 million. While executing a related search warrant at Trooper Harney’s home, investigators seized six plasma televisions, 32 high-end watches, a laptop computer, voluminous gambling records and more than $14,000 in cash. 6 0 College Student Suspicious Death Investigation— State Police devoted more than 300 Troopers and more than 100 recruits from two separate State Police training academy classes to investigating the death of 19-yearold John Fiocco, a student at The College of New Jersey who disappeared from a campus dormitory in March 2006. As part of the investigation, State Police led an exhaustive landfill search in Tullytown , Pa. resulting in the discovery of Fiocco’s body amidst nearly 15,000 cubic yards of refuse. The landfill search had been triggered by discovery of blood evidence in a trash dumpster at Fiocco’s TCNJ dormitory. Although investigation determined that the victim had at one point been in the dumpster, the cause and manner of Fiocco’s death has not been determined, and the investigation continues. Expansion of Operation Ceasefire— Through a $750,000 state appropriation, the multi-agency, anti-violence effort known as Operation Ceasefire began expanding in 2006 from three cities – Newark, Irvington and Camden — to several other urban centers. The newest Operation Ceasefire sites include Asbury Park, Atlantic City, Elizabeth, Jersey City, Lakewood, New Brunswick, Paterson, Plainfield, Trenton and Vineland/Millville. State Police detectives were an integral part of the growing Operation Ceasefire effort in 2006, and will remain so in the future. Operation Ceasefire is focused on solving gunrelated crimes, reducing street violence related to gang activity, cutting off the flow of illegal guns into New Jersey’s communities, and keeping those weapons from reaching the streets. 11

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New Jersey Office of The Attorney General • Department of Law & Public Safety Participation in Operation Falcon/Operation S.A.F .E. Guard— During 2006 the State Police Fugitive Unit — working as members of the New York/New Jersey Fugitive Task Force — participated in the U.S. Marshal Service’s “Operation Falcon III” sweep of violent criminals and sex offenders who had failed to register as required by law. The effort spanned a full week and resulted in the arrest of more than 500 people. Members of the State Police Fugitive Unit also conducted Operation S.A.F .E. Guard (Sexual Assailant Fugitive Enforcement) in 2006, which focuses on locating and arresting sex offenders wanted by county agencies for failing to register. Operation S.A.F .E. Guard began in Union County, and will continue until all 21 counties have been canvassed. In 2006, the effort resulted in the arrest of 38 wanted sex offenders. Operation Ninja (Phase II) : State Police detectives, working in conjunction with the Division of Criminal Justice, developed cases against several new suspects as a second phase of Operation Ninja – an investigation targeting the theft and illegal resale of motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles and autos — continued in 2006. Launched two years ago, Operation Ninja focused on those involved with stealing, possessing, titling and falsely “stamping” motorcycles, ATVs and other vehicles. In December 2006, detectives from the State Police auto unit arrested Gabriel Evans and Jeffrey Morgan on charges related to the theft of motorcycles and titling of same. Not long afterward, additional members of the alleged theft ring were taken into custody by State Police including Gregory Kellum, Angel Carrion III and Tyrone Sapp. Suspects Kellum and Carrion were arrested at their homes, while Sapp was taken into custody at East Jersey State Prison, where he was scheduled for release after serving an unrelated prison term. Sapp was released to State Police detectives who promptly transported him to the Burlington County Jail to await adjudication of his new criminal charges – theft and receiving stolen property. Clement Bilski /Operation Riptide Investigation— Members of the State Police Digital Technology Investigations Unit spearheaded several significant child pornography investigations in 2006 including one that resulted in the arrest of self-employed carpenter Clement Bilski. In April 2006, a search of Bilski’s Ocean Township home and subsequent analysis of confiscated computer media revealed images of Bilski sexually assaulting female children ranging in age from 15 months to seven years. The investigation also determined that Bilski had installed clandestine cameras in the bedrooms and bathrooms of several residences belonging to carpentry customers in Ocean and Monmouth counties. Bilski was charged with aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, endangering the welfare of a child, creating child pornography, voyeurism and possession and distribution of child pornography. He was indicted by a Monmouth County grand jury in July 2006 on 523 criminal counts. In an unrelated child pornography case, State Police Digital Technology Investigations Unit personnel conducted an investigation known as Operation Riptide that led to the arrest of seven people for distributing child rape videos. Among those arrested was an elementary school teacher from Lower Township, Cape May County. Taj Mahal Executive Charged with Commercial Bribery— Members of the State Police Casino Gaming Bureau arrested George Klima, the Taj Mahal Casino’s Executive Director of Purchasing, in April 2006 following an investigation that resulted in charges that Klima tried to bribe a licensed casino service contractor. According to the charges against him, Klima allegedly tried to compel Atlantic City Linen Supply to hire him at a salary of $75,000-peryear for five years plus full benefits and relocation fees to Delaware. In return, Klima sought to implement new sales contracts between Taj Mahal and Atlantic City Linen that would provide the dry cleaning company a seven percent increase in revenues. The additional cost of dry cleaning services that Klima’s employer, 12

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Division of State Police Taj Mahal, would pay under the new contracts was designed to help Atlantic City Linen absorb the cost of hiring Klima. He was charged with commercial bribery. State Governmental Security Bureau— Security enhancements consisting of $1.2 million in construction and state-of-the-art upgrades were implemented in 2006 at the front of the New Jersey State House. Included in the enhancements was an upgraded visitor screening system at the front entrance to the building. This new area consisted of approximately $900,000 in construction alterations and increased security measures including a state-of-the-art badging system for all visitors, The badging system retains all visitor information indefinitely, and produces a photo bade for each visitor. Each State House visitor now passes through a metal detector, and packages and deliveries are sent through an x-ray machine. Ozgur Yetim Casino “Markers” Investigation— After approximately $150,000 in markers obtained by gambler Ozgur Yetim at the Borgata Hotel and Casino were returned for insufficient funds, State Police Casino Gaming Bureau members launched an investigation into the credit activity of the Island Park, N.Y. resident. Ultimately, detectives learned that Yetim had obtained markers from seven additional Atlantic City casinos, and that all of them – totaling $685,000 – had been returned for insufficient funds. Yetim was arrested in November 2006 at the Borgata while in possession of $14,000 cash and $6,500 in gaming chips. He was charged with eight counts of writing bad checks. 6 0 Homeland Security Branch Highlights Operation Safe Freight: During 2006, the State Police Transportation Safety Bureau conducted eight separate details. Through the cooperative effort of the State Police and the New Jersey Division of Taxation, assessments applied to motor carriers during Operation Safe Freight resulted in recovery of more than $405,000 for the State. Administrative Branch Highlights The New Jersey State Police initiated an effort in 2006 to obtain accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agenices (CALEA). If the volunteer effort is successful, it will help the State Police maintain the consistent standard of excellence it has achieved through the federal Consent Decree process. The CALEA accreditation process involves being evaluated against a set of approximately 446 professional standards organized into 38 topic categories. The CALEA’s overall goals for participating police agencies include: strengthening their crime prevention capabilities, formal implementation of the most effective management procedures, establishing and maintaining fair and non-discriminatory personnel practices, improving interagency cooperation, and increasing community confidence. Hazardous Materials Response Unit— The State Police Hazardous Materials Response Unit responded to 276 calls for service in 2006 including several suspected CBRNE and criminal incidents that involved such incidents as hoax anthrax threat letters and the recovery of biological materials. Canine Unit— Dogs assigned to the State Police canine unit were responsible for the recovery of $4.4 million in currency, six kilograms of cocaine, 16 pounds of heroin, 43 pounds of marijuana and 2.5 pounds of methamphetamine. The unit also conducted more than 3,000 searches for explosives in 2006. 13

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