September 2015 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

 

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September 2015 Auto & Trucking Atlantic

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auto CARS • TRUCKS • JOBBERS C-STORES • INSTALLERS • RECYCLERS CARWASHES • SERVICE STATIONS DEALERS • GARAGES • BODY SHOPS & trucking SEPTEMBER 2015 $4.95 BIG RACES CLOSE OFF MARITIME RACING SEASON IN BIG WAYS (STORY ON PAGE 38) KEEP ‘EM ROLLING SMOOTH (SEE PAGE 23) FEMALES NOW PUSHING BARRIERS! (SEE PAGE 36) ELECTRIC VEHICLES: PLUGGING INTO THE FUTURE WHY A PROFESSIONAL CAR WASH FACILITY? (SEE PAGE 54) WIN PRIZES!!! A BRAND NEW DIE-CAST CAT CT660 DUMP TRUCK OR A NAPA 126 PIECE TOOL SET! CROSSWORD GUESS & WIN DETAILS ON PAGES 61 AND 62! OWNED AND PUBLISHED BY ALFERS ADVERTISING & PUBLISHING INC. Publications Mail Sales Agreement Number: 40062985

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auto scan & visit our online hub! Call us toll-free: 1-866-423-3939 Fax us: 1-902-423-3354 E-mail us: rob@autoatlantic.com Mail us: 51 Bethany Way Halifax, NS B3S 1H6 atlantic V O L U M E F O U R T E E N • I S S U E 5 • S E P T E M B E R • 2 0 1 5 & trucking Page 6 PLUGGING INTO THE HALIFAX VEHICLE CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW – When industry stakeholders from across the continent gathered in Halifax last May. BIG RIG TRUCKERS ROLLIN’ IN FOR A SAFE DRIVE IN THE 2015 SPECIAL OLYMPICS TRUCK CONVOY – Big-hearted truckers sign on for the latest edition. THE ATLANTIC ROAD REPORT – Bridge memorializes Labrador vets. • More! NEWS OF THE WEIRD – So what happened when Chevy issued the world’s first press release written entirely in Emoji? KEEP ‘EM ROLLING SMOOTH – While the future looks secure for e-vehicles, bear in mind the features that will need servicing. ELECTRIC AVENUE – Carter Hammett surveys the landscape and gathers evidence of the e-car’s slow but sure inevitable march forward into the marketplace. BUYING A USED CAR CAN BE ELECTRIFYING – E-vehicles are already helping to create a new industry: the second hand vehicle with a twist, writes Kenneth E. Seaton ORGANIC LIQUID DE-ICING…Rust’s Miracle Grow – Wouldja believe one more bad thing for the environment is that sketchy…beet juice??? We have a solution for that. FEMALE TESTDRIVE STUDENTS: PUSHING THROUGH SOCIAL BARRIERS – Women are starting to make inroads in fields traditionally-dominated by men. BIG RACES CLOSE OFF MARITIME RACING SEASON IN BIG WAYS- Here’s Tim Terry proactively offering the best tips to see another racing season off. AXALTA SPONSORS SKILLS CANADA CAR PAINTING COMPETITION – Over 500 students have the event, um, covered, during a awareness –raising campaign. YOU CAN’T CREATE THE FUTURE BY CLINGING TO THE PAST – Bob Greenwood calls out for car biz owners to let go of dated service approaches and move in synch. THE RIGHT CARWASH – Jay LaRue weighs in on whether or not to wash your car at home or take it to the local carwash. Guess which side wins? FIX AUTO SECURES $8.2 MILLION INVESTMENT TO FUEL GROWTH – A major achievement to accelerate development of an already-powerful network is secured. WIN BIG! A 1:50 scale die-cast dump truck from Atlantic Cat, or a NAPA 126 piece tool set in our 2 BIG contests!! s e p t e m b e r 2015 n autoatlantic.com Page 14 Page 16 Page 20 ADVERTISING DIRECTORY: PAGE 60 PUBLISHER / OWNER Robert Alfers rob@autoatlantic.com EDITOR Carter Hammett carter@autoatlantic.com OFFICE MANAGER James Somers james@autoatlantic.com Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine is owned and published bi-monthly by Robert Alfers of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. For advertising rates or information regarding Auto & Trucking Atlantic magazine, please call or write to us at: 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3S 1H6. Tel 902.423.6788 Fax 902.423.3354. Opinions expressed in Auto & Trucking Atlantic do not necessarily reflect official policy of Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. Printed and produced in Canada. Page 23 Page 26 Page 30 Page 34 Page 36 Page 38 Page 50 Page 52 Page 54 Page 60 Member AIA Canada, CCA, AAIA, ATA and the AMA Publications Mail Agreement No. 40062985 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Alfers Advertising & Publishing Inc. 51 Bethany Way, Halifax, NS B3S 1H6 Page 61 Page 62 3

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Letter from the Editor THE HACKABLE CAR A By Carter Hammett LTHOUGH THIS ISSUE OF AUTO AND TRUCKING ATLANTIC CELEBRATES THE EVOLUTION OF THE E-VEHICLE, THERE IS A STARK REALITY THAT ALSO NEEDS TO BE ADDRESSED: HACKING. You read that right. For all intents and purposes, your car is a smartphone on wheels and as such it’s vulnerable to hacking as demonstrated in a recent Wired piece that sent the Internet into a tizzy after two ethical hackers remotely bypassed security in a Jeep Cherokee. Their actions affected everything from the brakes, steering, entertainment system, air conditioning, windshield wipers and fans as the helpless driver sank into an accelerated state of frustration. This scenario is yet another heads-up to the industry that keeps adding Internetconnected components such as navigation, which are great for drivers but also up the ante in terms of vehicle vulnerability. Fiat Chrysler issued a software fix, after the hackers breached the Jeep Cherokee’s Uconnect entertainment platform. Indeed, while self-parking and cruise control are pretty awesome features to have in your vehicle, the risk of being hacked increases. As of now, that’s a fairly difficult scenario to picture, but theoretically if automakers standardize their software, becoming more uniform in the process, the risk of violation also theoretically increases. In response, the Ohio-based National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been hard at work hacking into vehicles trying to stay ahead of the enemy, revealing in the process the multitude of ways your vehicle can be attacked: locks, lights, horns, seat belts, steering, engines are all up for grabs. Oh, did I mention that this can happen while the car is in motion? Another element at risk of course, is consumer data privacy. Industry stakeholders are working on addressing this matter as well. So, while the pundits work diligently trying to circumvent cyber attacks, what can you do to lessen vulnerability of your vehicle? For starters, it’s wise to engage a trust- worthy mechanic since a car’s diagnostic connection is a pathway where malware can be installed to allow a remote hack. There’s also a port underneath your dash on the driver’s side called the OBD-II. Become familiar with it, especially visually. If it looks like it’s been subjected to foul play, call your dealership immediately. Other things that you can do include not plugging unscreened devices into your vehicle’s USB, including music. These can help introduce malware which can in turn attack your car’s computer system. Industry stakeholders can certainly contribute to the cause in numerous ways, including third-party testing and Internetbased security updates, similar to what your home computer receives. The latter idea seems to be catching on as Ford announced a switch to this system earlier this year. Paying hackers to share data ain’t exactly a bad idea either. They can shed light on security flaws and pocket buckets o’ cash in the process. E-vehicle security was certainly one of the topics on the table at the seventh Electric Vehicle Conference and Trade Show back in May. With Halifax hosting, cross-sector stakeholders from across North America came together to discuss everything from vehicle charging to the latest developments in hybrid technology. A highlight of the event was a crosscountry e-car race called the E-mazing Event, which showcased vehicles in a traditional cross country race that ended in Vancouver. ATA staffer James Somers has done an admirable job of encapsulating the event including the importance that e-vehicles can have on the economy and the future of infrastructure as they begin to penetrate the Atlantic market. Although public acceptance is slowly growing, the population is also gradually starting to wake up to the potential these amazing machines can offer. E-vehicles have already proven they’re a viable alternative to the dated concept of fossil fuels. It’s only a matter of time before they become a permanent part of the landscape. 4 autoatlantic.com n s e p t e m b e r 2015

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6 autoatlantic.com n s e p t e m b e r 2015

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PLUGGING INTO THE HALIFAX ELECTRIC VEHICLE CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW By James Somers ALIFAX WAS THE HOST OF THE SEVENTH ELECTRIC VEHICLE CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW 2015 ORGANIZED BY ELECTRIC MOBILITY CANADA (EMC) FROM MAY 25-TO-27. THIS WAS THE FIRST TIME THE EVENT HAS BEEN HELD IN THE MARITIMES. In attendance were some of the Canadian leaders in transportation electrification which included researchers, new technology developers, vehicle and charging station manufacturers, suppliers, fleet managers, electric vehicle owners’ associations and students. This three-day event showcased many panels, presentations and keynotes outlining Canada’s current status in Electric Vehicle (EV) technology, including where the Atlantic region fits in that arena and, by studying the inroads made by other regions in North America, how to increase the awareness and the infrastructure within the East Coast. Panels included the social aspects of electric mobility like the purchase price and what it’s like to drive an electric car with the weather, terrain, range of EVs and problems unique to the Maritime region. Other panels and discussions were centered around different aspects of an electrified transportation system such as potential charging strategies for electric motor-driven public buses and newer “green” trends such as car sharing. While there were presentations by Quebec Power and NB Power, the event was led by NS Power who was one of the major sponsors. During the three days, there were discussions on the technical impact involving Electric Vehicles on the power grid along with energy storage and using EVs to feed a “smart grid” where the energy from smart cars are fed back into the grid in times of need. Also discussed were the benefits of car sharing and using an EV as the car to be shared. One-in-5 users give up a car completely but more were likely to get an EV after using one as part of a car share program. Ultimately, one shared car replaces 20 personally owned vehicles. Prior to the event, on Sunday major EV suppliers such as Kia, Ford, GM, Nissan, BMW, and Mitsubishi were available for a popular public ride-and-drive session. The average person was able to experience different EV models on Halifax streets. The event concluded with the start of the Emazing race, a national cross-country trek that showcased H the ability of Electric cars to travel the distance from Halifax to Vancouver. “Innovation leading to improved battery performance and infrastructure is an important factor contributing to increased EV adoption. These two factors, innovation and infrastructure, were also the theme of this year’s conference.” said EMC chair Catherine Kargas. EMC’s website describe themselves as, “a national not-for-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of electric mobility. The 140 members of EMC are from different industry sectors across the country and include infrastructure, technology and electricity providers, electric vehicle manufacturers, fleet managers, municipalities, universities, public transporters as well as EV owners groupings.” So what does all this mean? It means a gap still exists between the public who percives that there is still a long way to go and supporters of the technology. The expectation on the negative side is that battery technology needs to be in a position where an electric vehicle can travel 500 kilometres with a five minute charge time (the time it takes to fill a gas tank) in a unit that costs the same as their gas powered cousin, let’s say like a Ford Fiesta for $14,000. This is a reality that EV owners know is years away. It is also not what the electric car is to them. In Canada, there are just shy of 11,000 electric cars with 51% PHEV (Plug in Hybrid Electric) and 49% Battery Electric Hybrid. In total there are 5130 in Quebec, 3646 in Ontario and 1696 in BC with the rest scattered throughout the Prairies and the East Coast. Based on data presented during the conference, EV owners are savvy enough to understand the benefits and pitfalls of driving a car that runs on electricity. One of the biggest issues is making the public aware of those benefits and this was addressed during the conference. Starting with the dealer, they first see the early adopters who want to confirm what they read about EVs, both good and bad. They have questions and want to “kick the tires” for themselves. This is followed by the cautious customer who has heard about electric cars but does not know much about them outside of mainstream media. They’re reluctant to change traditional driving habits and want options and affordable price comparisons. Finally there’s the buyer who has no interest and is terrified that they will electrocute themselves just trying to plug it in when it rains. So this means dealers need to have at least one unit on hand for test drives, a charging station and at least one salesperson who knows about the technology; gas vs kilowatts, maintenance, what (if any) government rebates, charging stations, smartphone s e p t e m b e r 2015 n autoatlantic.com PHOTO: JAMES SOMERS 7

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Future Technologies apps, prepaid charging cards and a key issue - range. This does present some problems however. More time devoted to selling means less profit. The dealer needs to decide if dedicating sales floor area to this enterprise justifies the interest. The consumer also needs the investment in specialized tools such as home charging stations. So in the end are EVs profitable to a dealer? One dealer in Quebec demonstrated that of the 214 EV units on his lot he had 100 new and 114 preowned. When these units sold, 35% of his total sales were EVs and those EVs were all new business – resulting in an increase of 35% business growth. We have yet to see that if a shift in decimal points of this example is viable in Atlantic Canada but ask the winner of the Electric Vehicle Dealership Inspiration Award: John Gordon of Green Rock EVS in Mount Pearl, NF for his opinion. (see sidebar). The Canadian distribution numbers, listed above, reflect another issue - a reduction in the number of EVs in BC that was noticed when the incentive program PHOTO: JAMES SOMERS was removed. The three major provinces that have the most number of electric cars are also the provinces that provide purchase incentives. Purchase incentives go a long way to cut that price difference between traditional gas-powered cars and electric vehicles. There are currently no purchase incentives in the Maritime provinces. Atlantic EV sales figures are so negligible at this point, there would be little impact to the bottom line of the provincial budget. There is concern by some that an electric vehicle will not be contributing to road maintenance as the funds for this are generated from gas taxes. A battery powered auto would not contribute to this because it uses no gasoline. As with purchase incentives, this is an issue that EV owners wish would not be a problem. This brings us to range, which is directly related to infrastructure. Electric cars need electricity. The “do-fer” solution at this time is two separate technologies: a battery-only and a hybrid system that uses a gasoline engine to provide current to an electric motor. The hybrid gets the range and comfort level for the traditional driver but does nothing for the electric only solution. Is the infrastructure that difficult to support? There are three basic types of charging stations. For the home there are two units, the Level I - a 15 amp charging station that keeps you from having an extension cord running from your house. A home unit will cost about $800. Level II units range from 25-to-100 amps and cost between $700-and-$1300. The higher the amperage, the shorter the recharge time. According to conference data, 63% of EV owners charge their EV at home. Nineteen per cent also charge their EV at work, effectively doubling the commuting range of their vehicle. There is a spike in charging sessions on weekends. An integral part of a more extended public infrastructure system are Direct Current Fast Chargers (DCFC). These units work in the 480-to-647 volt range and can produce a full charge from empty in roughly 30 minutes and aimed at a commercial market installation. Only 19% of Electric car users charge 8 autoatlantic.com n s e p t e m b e r 2015

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AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE! NOW AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL ATLANTIC NAPA STORE!

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Atlantic Racing News Future Technologies their car using a system consisting of commercial versions of the Level I, Level II and newer Level III (DCFC) chargers that are available to the public, yet this is perceived as the weak link in owning an EV as the general public believes in the possibility of running out of electric power while driving. Last October there was only one DCFC in service in Quebec. By December that figure grew to seven and were strategically placed in urban, suburban and “the corridor” - the highway system between Montreal and Quebec City. Currently (no pun intended) there are 12,000 charging sessions per month between the dozen DCFC units (which now includes one mobile charger - taking the scare out of being stranded). Nova Scotia has made a step in this direction with the installation of the first High Power charging station in Halifax located at the Barrington Street Superstore. The dual port charging station was installed though NS Power in partnership with Loblaws and AddEnergie, the owner-and-operator of the largest charging station network in Canada. There are a number of Level II units around the city (including The Westin and the nearby Farmers Market which was the starting point for the Emazing Race) but this marks the first high speed charger. A request for support for electric vehicles was made to HRM in January leading up to the Electric Mobility Canada conference. Nova Scotia Electric Vehicle Highway Services asked Halifax to contribute $16,000 toward installing 40 electric vehicle charging stations across Halifax, representing about 14 per cent of the total installation costs. The infrastructure could evolve gradually, fuelled by retail and consumer habits. A commercial Level II charger can range from $1900-to-$2400 not including installation compared to a commercial gas pump at $9,000-to-$13,000. It is conceivable that retail locations could set up special parking for EVs, similar to Handicap and New Mother spaces, so that EV drivers can charge while they shop. There are a number of hotels that include overnight recharging for EV owners, in particular Best Western in partnership with Sun County Highway “which was created to build the most sustainable electric vehicle infrastructure in the world.” Sun Country Highway sees this as part of an eco-friendly tourism network where tourist spend more money on their vacation and less on gasoline. While finding a gas station is not that difficult, finding a charging station is a bit more challenging. This is where that darling of our modern times comes in, the Internet. There are several apps available for both smartphones and the on-board EV computer. By using GPS, a station can be located, a map to it presented and appointment made for a recharge. Electric cars in the Atlantic region still have a way to go. Nova Scotia has less than 100 Electric cars and 45 charging stations, New Brunswick has less than 50 and 30 stations, Newfoundland less than 15 and 20 stations and finally PEI, with less than 10 and a disproportional 30 stations. One of the final talks was presented by NSPow- CONFERENCE ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE CHAIR DAVE SWAN… On the conference… “Think we have made progress, we have members of the EMC on the East Coast and we have large utilities, universities and individuals and a growing interest in electric vehicles,” said David Swan, Chair – Conference Organization Committee, “Some of the presentations were extraordinary. “The timing of NS Power’s presentation a few weeks ago describing excessive wind energy, which we had to back off the grid just under extraordinary circumstances, and not something we can expect in the future. Electric vehicles can help solve that. The opportunity to use less diesel and gasoline in our province by going electric I think is very real. We import absolutely everything at the moment, there is not even a refinery here so there is no added value. All these things just send money out of the province. “We have the opportunity to generate the electricity here and use it in our transportation. “I’m not naive. It is not going to happen overnight but if I can help it along, accelerate the process by a few years, then we have truly done our job.” What about Incentives? “Incentives will be difficult,” he said, “but as the students reported, we are not like the big three in Canada. Incentives can be a simple as allowing EVs to charge overnight; the same as we have thermal storage already in the province at a special lower rate for heating your home. That moves our load in the right direction, so that is a clear incentive. One might envision sales tax incentives, like various products that have no sales tax because we see social good in them. I’m an engineer, not a social scientist and not a politician, that’s for sure.” As for the traditional service station? “These cars are not going to be maintenance-free. You still need to change tires and other various things - but it will be different. “My Dad was a mechanic and he rebuilt engines,and I watched him do it - and in the seventies, an engine that went 50-to-70 thousand miles at the time, you got a rebuilt. You did transmissions and so on. He lived his life in oil and grease. “Modern vehicles have changed. Automatic transmissions used to be a big deal and he made a lot of money in automatic transmissions back then. Today they work well. So what has happened is the industry of servicing vehicles, in general, has become more electronic with OBD II connectors and so on, we are moving from a very mechanical to more of a technician type person who works on your car and replaces modular components. “EV’s are the next extension of that. These are electronic vehicles, and because they are on the Internet, the dealer will already know of a problem because the onboard computer has diagnosed before you even arrive. So a light comes on and the car then reports an issue, ‘please take it to a dealer,’ then provides appointment times and so on. You take it to the dealer and they repair it. They know it’s coming and know what parts they need and can have them already shipped in. “So that is kind of an extension of how we even manufacture cars now. At one time Ford had large warehouses of parts, there was not just-in-time delivery. I can imagine services as just-in-time. “So people might have to change jobs, that’s true, but I do not know of any industry or profession that if you stop moving, your job is secure.”

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Future Technologies er, whose support for electric cars was reinforced by their commitment to reduce the production of electricity by coal from 76% in 2007 to 60% in 2015 and then down to 45% by 2020 so that electric cars can make an even less environmental impact than gasoline burning counterparts. In the end, the conference outlined a Canadian National Roadmap that suggested a shared vision for the next five years and a comprehensive action plan with recommended targets, actions, timelines, costs, feasibility and contributions. Stakeholders suggested setting out the goal of an EV infrastructure with more than 2000 level II public charging stations with more than 50 DC Fast chargers in place with more to come. The conference concluded that more information is needed on the impact of the electrification of transportation, focusing on EV awareness, infrastructure and business models including car sharing and public transit. 12 autoatlantic.com n s e p t e m b e r 2015 PHOTO: JAMES SOMERS

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Around the Atlantic MEET YOUR NEW ATA GROUP BENEFITS & PENSIONS TEAM HE AUTOMOTIVE TRADES ASSOCIATION (ATA) IS PLEASED TO INTRODUCE OUR NEW EMPLOYEE BENEFITS CONSULTANTS TO MEET THE GROWING NEED FOR INDUSTRY INSURANCE BENEFITS PROGRAMS. Mr. Mark Denholm and Patty MacDonald from MacLellan & Moffat Benefits Experts bring a further level of experience and high level of service to the ATA program. Effective March 1, 2015, our Group Benefits Program has not only been expanded by sales personnel but the benefits offered will now include access to Group RRSPs and Pensions. The growth within the team members has moved us from PREFERRED STATUS with Medavie Blue Cross to ELITE STATUS awarding us better access to the benefit plans that we all know are paramount for the Automotive Industry to attract and retain good employees. We are currently in the process of redesigning our Benefit Brochure which we will be distributing through a direct mail out and personally delivering to as many automotive industry related companies as we can reach. We are looking forward to meeting with industry employers very soon to further assist in taking advantage of this new program. For more details, please contact the Automotive Trades Association at ataatlantic@eastlink.ca or toll free 1-877-860-3805. T OUR TEAM: FRONT ROW LEFT: PATTY MCDONALD – MACLELLAN& MOFFATT BENEFITS EXPERTS, SHARON HOGG – MACLELLAN & MOFFATT BENEFITS EXPERTS, LISA JONCAS – L JONCAS INSURANCE SERVICES. BACK ROW LEFT: MARK DENHOLM – MACLELLAN & MOFFATT BENEFITS EXPERTS, GRAHAM CONRAD – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUTOMOTIVE TRADES ASSOCIATION, CARLOS RODRIGUES – CORPORATE BENEFITS 2000.

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Truckers Corner BIG RIG TRUCKERS ARE ROLLIN’ IN FOR A SAFE DRIVE IN THE 2015 SPECIAL OLYMPICS TRUCK CONVOY N By Megan Winsor EW BIG RIGS REGISTER AND MANY ARE COMING BACK TO ENJOY OUR PUBLIC RETURN CELEBRATION WITH ICE ROAD TRUCKER, ALEX D. AND SINGER CHARLIE A’COURT More big hearted truckers and supporters join the Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Convoy (truckconvoyNS.ca) as it just gets better. Not only does Nova Scotia’s 1700 Special Olympic (SONS.ca) Athlete’s have the support of Irving Oil as 2015 Convoy presenting sponsor, it also has a sustained focus on trucker safety and a public return celebration for trucking industry professionals and those who support them with amazing entertainment and fun. While the connection between sports and trucking, health and safety may be obvious to many, it has a unique significance with the trucking profession. The sustained and early support from the Nova Scotia Trucking Safety Association (NSTSA.ca) which provides training and certifications to members throughout the province, has facilitated fundraising by over 150 truckers registered in the convoy. Fundraising with the “Trucker Buddy” program provides an opportunity for drivers and sponsors to meet and support a specific SONS Athlete. In fact Alex D, our Ice Road Trucker and Convoy Marshall was motivated to support the Nova Scotia Convoy due in large part to a good friend who has a connection to a family member with an intellectual disability. (trucker buddies below) Register early to drive as the September 19th 2015 Convoy will likely have a waiting list with over 70 trucks already registered. One of those early rigs to sign up to drive is Eassons Transport Ltd., safety certified by the NSTSA, registered for the first time. SONS talked with Gordie Atwood, an Eassons employee, about the NSTSA and getting involved with the World’s Largest Truck Convoy for Special Olympics Nova Scotia. (SONS.ca) This is the first year Eassons has participated in the convoy. Hopefully it will be the first of many! “What we don’t do this year we will be involved with next year,” Atwood continues. “This year, we’re looking at doing something within Eas- sons to support the convoy.” Eassons works closely with the NSTSA, who is another supporter of #ConvoyNS2015. NSTSA regularly conducts audits to guarantee that all of Eassons trucks, procedures, and policies are up to standard. Trevor Bent, an Eassons employee, serves on the NSTSA’s executive team of board of directors. The fundraising efforts of Convoy drivers and Trucker Buddies provide resources to implement new demonstration sports such as rhythmic gymnastics at the 2015 Summer Games amongst the 860 Athletes Halifax who participate. Beyond intense sports competition, Convoy funds assist in delivering the “Active Start” program for children 2 to 12 years old. Special Olympics Nova is dedicated to providing health services and education to Special Olympics athletes, while changing the way health systems interact with people with intellectual disabilities. During our 2015 Summer Games, with the tremendous help of volunteers from Dalhousie School of Ophthalmology they delivered the ‘Opening Eyes’ services to Athletes. We are excited to welcome a second BIG RIGs dealer in Nova Scotia to our event – East Coast International will join Nova Truck Centres (eastcoastint.com) to showcase their support of the trucking industry and its interest in helping the Nova Scotia community. It’s “Up time” for Truck Convoy 2015. Another important Convoy partner is the law enforcement and military communities in Nova Scotia, collectively referred to as The Law Enforcement Torch Run® (LETR). The mission of the LETR for Special Olympics is to increase awareness and raise funds for the Special Olympics movement. The support and assistance of the Department of Defence (DND) at Shearwater, the site of our convoy and return celebration is as you would expect … top notch, and with military precision! Join our Convoy and Celebrate! Signup forms are available on our website or by contacting Anne Marie Shannon by email or phone at (902) 429 – 2266 ext. 2. 14 autoatlantic.com n s e p t e m b e r 2015

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