2010 TNT Swimming Swimmer Handbook

 

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2010 TNT Swimming Swimmer Handbook

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www.tritonswim.org

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2 CONTENTS The expectations, structures and perspectives presented in this handbook are specific to the Tulare program. Please ask the coach of your program for guidance that is intended for your development. Overview & Mission Team Apparel Coaches Age Group vs. Senior Swimming College Swimming Entering a Meet What to do at Meets Unattached & High School Swimming Swimming Groups in Tulare Meet Calendars Goals Tulare Group Time Standards Swim Meet Time Standards Top 100 & Records Some TNT Alumni Honorary Mention 3 4 5 9 10 12 13 14 15 20 21 23 26 31 37 38

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TNT SWIMMING—TULE NATION TRITONS SWIMMER HANDBOOK (Tulare) 3 The mission of TNT Swimming is to provide opportunity for the individual athlete to achieve at the highest level of desired attainment. Previously known as the Tulare Swim Club, our club elected to merge in 1992 with Kings Swim Club from Hanford and Lemoore, California for a variety of reasons deemed beneficial to both clubs. Hence both clubs adopted a new name that would be representative of the broader geographical region. Beginning around 2005, smaller teams in the area began to see a need to provide experiences for their swimmers such as swimming relays, traveling in larger groups, and becoming part of a more competitive program. The concept of affiliate programs of TNT began to expand. Tule Nation Tritons (TNT) is the name of our club and we exist within Central California Swimming (CCS) which is the Local Swim Committee (LSC) and governing body for swim teams in our area. Central California Swimming is comprised of eighteen teams throughout Central California, and is a regional unit of USA Swimming. Currently our team operates in the towns of Hanford, Porterville, Selma, Tulare and Visalia. Although each program has variations in the overall focus, each addresses the variety in ability levels of athletes. While we all practice at different times in different pools, we are nonetheless one unified team and operate proudly as such under the TNT banner at meets. Our logo and image are intended to be carried throughout the organization as there are advantages for our athletes that are associated with numbers. This united approach provides our athletes greater recognition within Central California Swimming and, because of those past members who successfully carried the TNT emblem nationally, better recognition of our current swimmers on national and collegiate levels. The combined TNT is proud to have developed two Olympic Trial athletes (Kohlton Norys & Bradley Matsumoto), a National Age Group record holder, and a Division 1 NCAA Champion (Kohlton Norys). We are also proud of our current collegiate representation at schools such as Auburn, Kentucky, LSU, Fresno Pacific, Fresno State and COS.

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4 TEAM APPAREL Tule Nation Tritons is a Speedo sponsored team, and as such our uniform and training equipment reflects the Speedo brand. Speedo is arguably the leader in competitive swimming gear, and supplies athletes with high quality suits including the acclaimed Lazar that had been showcased for the first time on a broad scale during the 2008 Olympic Trials, and then on to the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. As a sponsor, Speedo provides racing suits to our swimmers who qualify at the Junior National level and higher, and this provision is made at no cost to the swimmer or family. Additionally, Speedo offers discounts to our team members when various Speedo products are purchased through Swim Suits West (our local Speedo distributor). We encourage all athletes to be in uniform during all competitions. Our team suit is solid navy blue with the green TNT logo affixed to the right rear of the male suit, and center front on the female suit. Our suit remains the same from one year to the next, as this helps establish a consistent image of our club. TNT swim suits, parkas and warm-ups can be ordered through Swim Suits West in Fresno by calling 1-800877-8117. Norm Allington of Swim Suits West is also present at various local swim meets throughout the year. During competition, if the swimmer wears a swim cap, they are encouraged to wear the team cap. Our general team cap is navy blue with the green TNT logo on the side. These caps are available from our team. Swimmers who qualify and attend age group or senior championship meets may have earned a championship team cap which may alter the color scheme; however, the TNT logo remains constant. Maintaining a consistent team image contributes to developing a sense of pride among all our swimmers during local swim meets, and enhances the potential for recognition that our swimmers may receive from college recruiters while at higher levels of competition. Swimmers who have excelled in the past have provided an avenue toward college recognition for those current TNT swimmers who desire to make the sacrifice and commitment to also receive that recognition. The establishment of a uniformed image is considered important. Just as no individual player on an NFL or NBA team would ever consider taking the field or court in individualized apparel, we also try to instill in our youth the value of belonging to a team. Being able to contribute as a team member is a skill that transcends sports and is a trait that our young members will need to adopt as they enter into professions of adulthood. Other team items that can be ordered through the club include: • Training Equipment • Parka • Swim Suit • Team Bag • Miscellaneous Merchandise • Team Sweats (Warm-up)

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TNT ASSOCIATE COACHES 5 One advantage of a sizable program is the number of coaches that are available for our swimmers. Our coaches work together at meets to take splits, give and receive feedback for improving swim performance, and collaborate when developing relays. Our team currently has approximately fourteen registered coaches. Our swimmers are encouraged to interact with any coach of TNT, and feel comfortable approaching any of them if that swimmer’s primary coach is not present at any given meet. Angela Martinho TULARE COACHES Angela Martinho is the Head Age Group Coach in Tulare and was voted as the 2008 Central California Swimming Age Group Coach of the Year. Angela has also developed high school Valley qualifiers and finalists. The Advanced Swimmer and Competitive Groups that Angela currently coaches is comprised of both age-group, high-school and collegiate athletes whose intent is to reach the higher realms of competitive swimming. Angela has developed top-eight finalists at the Age Group Invitational in Southern California and Far Westerns in Pacific Swimming. Since 2008 she developed a swimmer to a national top 10 ranking and a Western Zone champion. Angela was selected as a member of the coaching staff for the 2007, 2008 and 2009 Central California Swimming Western Zone Team for competition in New Mexico, Oregon and Hawaii respectively. She was also a member of the 2008 and 2009 All Star coaching staff for Central California Swimming when they competed against San Diego Imperial and Sierra Nevada. Her coaching experience includes club programs, such as the East Bay Aquatics Team and summer league programs in Tulare. Her swimming experience includes competing for California State University, Hayward where she was a finalist in their championship meet for both the 200 IM and 100 fly events. She also competed in swimming and water polo for Tulare Western High School, her alma mater, where she returned to teach mathematics. Angela is a former swimmer of TNT from 1989 and she has many swim times that still remain on our all-time Top 100 list. She is currently pursuing her Masters Degree in Educational Administration. Jacqueline Delgado Jacqueline is the coach for the Precompetitive and Swimmer Groups in Tulare and has rapidly developed Junior Olympic qualifiers among those who are new to club swimming. She is a graduate of Tulare Union High School where she competed on the varsity swim team all four years and on the varsity water polo team for three years. In 2009, Jacqueline coached the water polo team at Tulare Western High School. She has been working with kids in the local community coaching basketball and t-ball. Jacqueline currently attends the College of the Sequoias and plans to attend Fresno State University or Fresno Pacific college. She has plans on starting a family and is pursuing a career in education.

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6 Bill Freeman Bill Freeman has a wealth of experience coaching swimmers from the age group level to the senior level. Bill is currently the high school coach for Tulare Union High School and he formerly coached Mt. Whitney High School in Visalia. Bill was a coach of Tulare Swim Club (now TNT) where he developed swimmers who still maintain team records. For instance, Bill was the primary coach for Jill Edminster who still holds 10-under team records that were established in 1990. Jill went on to attain a National Reportable Time in her backstroke. Bill has been head-of-program on several occasions. After being solicited by Sequoia Swim Club in Visalia to become their head coach, Bill went on to coach RCA where he developed swimmers such as Gina Fabrizio who broke CCS Records in backstroke. Bill also contributed to the development of Holly Calcote who qualified for the National Select Camp and went on to Junior and Senior Nationals. Bill went on to establish the Rocky Hill swim team that operated in Exeter and Reedley. Bill has served as Western Zone coach and All Star coach on numerous occasions in the past. His coaching style has historically been attractive to swimmers with a variety of abilities. A major focus of Bill is to ensure that each athlete enjoys the sport and he consistently incorporates fun in training. HANFORD COACHES Rhonda Shaw Rhonda is a local standout swimmer from our area who is now the senior coach in Hanford. She, along with Ann Pedro, are expanding the experiences of summer league swimmers from the area, and swimmers from Hanford are typically at the top of the 100% improvement lists. Standout Senior-level swimmers from Hanford include Sectional and Grand Prix qualifier Josh Tabers and Far Western, Western Zone and Sectional qualifier Hanna Giles. Hanna had been a Far Western finalist as a 10-under swimmer. Rhonda has also developed swimmers such as Taylor Shaw to qualify for the Southern California Age Group Invitational as well as the IMX Games that were scheduled to take place in Arizona in 2009. Ann Pedro Ann Pedro participated in competitive swimming along with Rhonda Shaw during the developmental years in both club, high school and college swimming. Ann’s focus in Hanford is on the developmental athlete and she works along side Rhonda in laying the foundational skills for both current and subsequent success of the swimmers.

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VISALIA COACHES Soozee Edminster 7 Soozee is the head coach of TNT in Visalia. She participated in training conducted at the US Olympic training center. Soozee was involved with USA Swimming and was mentored under coach Matt Vogel for Visalia Area Swim Team (VAST) from 1998 - 2000. Soozee has been working at the Lifestyle center for the past 10 years teaching stroke technique to numerous children striving for success in both summer league and club levels of swimming. She has contributed to developing the foundational skills for swimmers who have gone on to become successful at the summer league level and collegiate levels. Soozee is knowledgeable in concepts behind techniques associated with the Total Emersion program. Molly Neiderrider Molly has been swimming since 7 yrs old. She swam for Walnut Creek Aquabears for 14 years and Concord high school for four years. After high school she went on to swim for Indiana University for four years on a scholarship. Molly has many years of experience coaching swimming. She started her coaching in Concord, CA for their summer recreational swim team. She served two summers as their assistant coach and five summers as their head coach. Molly also was a age group swim coach for Walnut creek Aquabears for 2 years and Visalia Area Swim Team (VAST) for over 3 years. Molly’s coaching experience includes high school swimming. She was the head coach for the Varsity swim time and Ygnacio Valley High School for one season and is currently the Head Coach for the varsity swim team at Golden West High School. Molly is a volunteer coach for the Visalia Seahawks Swim Team. Jason Ricablanca Jason has an extensive background in club swimming as can be determined by his long standing team records, and the Central California Relay records that are still in existence. He has the background in knowing what it takes to reach the Junior and Senior National levels of competition. Emilee Lovell Emilee Lovell is a product of swimming in Visalia as she had started swimming with the Seahawks, swam with the VAST club program, then on to Redwood for all four years of high school, and competed at the collegiate level for COS for both years. Other Coaches include: Brittany Collingwood & Alex Muhs

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8 Kacy Ota SELMA COACHES Kacy was voted 2006 Age-Group Coach of the Year, and he began coaching RCA in 2000. He has developed many Junior Olympic qualifiers as well as qualifiers for the Southern California Swimming AA Meet, Far Westerns, and Western Zones. He has been part of the coaching staff of three Western Zone teams and three Central California Swimming All-Star teams. Kacy was also Head Diving Coach for Immanuel High School for two years, and is currently Head Coach for Selma High School’s swim team. Kacy is a product of the team he swam many years for. He graduated from Selma High School in 2001. Patrick Ota Patrick is a graduate of UC Santa Barbara, where he earned his BA in Film Studies and competed as a Division 1 swimmer. He was a three-time Big West Champion in the 100 backstroke, a former Big West Conference record-holder, and is still the Santa Barbara school record-holder in the event. Patrick is a Division 1 NCAA qualifier. Patrick is also a five-time National qualifier, a six-time high school All-American, a Western Zone Champion, a four-time CIF Champion, and a former CIF record holder in the 100 backstroke. Patrick brings with him a wealth of information related to collegiate swimming, based both on his experience swimming for a Division 1 school, and also in his current role of assistant coach for Fresno Pacific University. Tiffany Skidmore Tiffany Skidmore is a product of the program she currently coaches. Tiffany was a standout senior swimmer for Raisin Country Aquatics under Coach Gary Ota. She had qualified for and competed at several senior-level meets, and is now helping develop the age group program so that our youngsters may experience success and progress on to the seniorlevel as she had once done.

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9 AGE GROUP swimming is referred to as such because swimmers typically compete within certain age groups at meets. For instance, an eleven year old will only compete against 11 and 12 year olds. There might be an “open” event where the age groups are combined and an 11 year old competes against an 18 year old, but since the meet has age groups within its schedule elsewhere, it is still considered an age group meet. Age group meets include most local A-B-C meets as well as the Age Group Invitational (formerly AA’s), Far Westerns, and Western Zones. These three meets require a minimum time standard to compete, and are of a higher caliber than the typical local age group A-B-C meet; however, they are still considered age group meets. Age group meets are considered developmental meets to help swimmers progress on to the senior level of swimming. Categorizing swimmers into age groups helps swimmers compete at an appropriate level. Even though there exists 6-under, 8-under and 7-8 age groups, these are locally defined. Only the 10-under age group is nationally recognized. The 17-18 age group is the highest age group that is defined in club swimming. At times swimmers who newly enter an age group (age 9, 11, 13, 15 or 17) find competing against the swimmers at the top of the age group (10, 12, 14, 16 or 18) challenging. Swimmers should remember that the age grouping is only for developmental convenience. The long term goal should be to move on to senior swimming where only the time matters regardless of the age. SENIOR SWIMMING is referred to as such because most of the athletes who are eligible to compete at the senior level are older swimmers. The term eligible is used because most senior meets require a time standard in order to participate. In a senior meet, there are no age groups, only the event. All ages swim together and swimmers are seeded together according to their times. If a swimmer is eleven years old, and is fast enough to meet the minimum time standard, they are eligible to compete at the meet. A swimmer older than 18 may also compete at senior meets. It is common to see twelve year old girls competing along side twenty year old women at senior-level meets. National level senior meets include Sectionals, Junior Nationals, US Open, Senior Nationals, Olympic Trials, and the Olympics as examples. There are other senior meets that are local within the various geographical areas of the United States. These would include the Mission Swim Meet of Champions (SMOC), Senior Q, Terrapin Senior Meet to name three that are on our team Senior Meet Calendar. One important goal that swimmers should embrace while at the developmental level is to move toward the senior levels of swimming. College recognition is more often established at the senior level, and not at the age group level, although with access to a national database for all times, recruiters have easy access to times anywhere they were swum. Many of the senior meets that our team attends involve the participation of swimmers and teams that are affiliated with colleges and universities. Most major universities have a club swimming team, or their university team also maintains a club charter. For instance, Trojan Swim Team is the club program associated with the USC men’s and women’s college team. As our TNT swimmers qualify for meets such as the Santa Clara International, Long Beach Grand Prix, Janet Evans Invitational and Speedo Grand Challenge, our TNT swimmers compete at the meet with college programs from Stanford, USC, UCLA, Texas and Auburn to name a few. AGE GROUP vs. SENIOR

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10 COLLEGE SWIMMING There is an opportunity to swim in college for any swimmer who wishes to participate. It’s not a question of whether I can swim in college. If the desire is there, then the question is, at what level of college swimming do I want to participate. Swimming for a college team, and traveling with a college team, is a memorable experience regardless of the level in college. College swimming is divided into several categories: Junior College, NAIA and NCAA, and each has their unique rules of recruitment, eligibility requirements, and championship level culminating-meets that swimmers need to qualify for. Typically, swimmers have five years to use four years of eligibility in college swimming. The clock starts the first year that the swimmer is in college and participates in an organized competitive swimming event. Rules related to eligibility and recruiting of swimmers is different between NAIA and NCAA divisions of swimming, and even within the NCAA levels of swimming. The college conferences that schools belong to include various Divisions. For instance, the Pacific Collegiate Swim Conference includes schools from NCAA Division 1, Division 2, and Division 3 as well as NAIA schools. When considering a college to attend, swimmers should consider several factors related to the school, and not look solely at the swim program itself. SWIMMERS SHOULD ALSO ENSURE THAT THEY DEVELOP STRONG STUDY HABITS AND MAINTAIN A HIGH GRADE POINT AVERAGE WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND THEIR FIRST YEARS IN COLLEGE. GRADES ARE A MAJOR FACTOR IN THE RECRUITING PROCESS. Many swimmers enter JUNIOR COLLEGE (JC) and compete at this college level. These swimmers compete for two years, and many move on to complete their final two years of eligibility at a four year institution. Associations (i.e. conferences) for the JC include the National Junior College Athletic Association and the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA). College of the Sequoias (COS) is in the Central Valley Conference of the CCCAA along with Columbia, Fresno City, Merced, Porterville, Reedley, Taft and West Hills. Their Championship meet is typically held in April. Qualification for the Championship meet is not based on a time standard, but rather on placing high enough at predetermined meets within the season. The NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS (NAIA) includes four conferences: Independent, Bluegrass Mountain, Liberal Arts and Pacific Collegiate Swim. The Pacific Collegiate Swim Conference, which is the most common conference for California athletes, includes programs from NAIA (or Division 4) as well as NCAA Division schools. California Division 4 colleges in this conference include: Azuza Pacific, Biola (La Mirada), California Baptist (Riverside), CSU East Bay (Hayward), Fresno Pacific and Soka (Irvine). Many of these schools are private schools. NAIA schools have additional requirements for entering freshman to participate in athletics when compared to NCAA schools. Entering freshman must meet two of the three following requirements: •  A minimum score of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (Critical Reading and Math sections) • A high school grade point average of 2.00 or higher on a 4.00 scale • Graduate in the upper half of the high school graduating class NAIA Championships are typically held in March.

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11 NCAA (Division 1-3) The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) schools are divided into three categories: Division 1 (D1), Division 2 (D2) and Division 3 (D3). Each division has their National or Championship meet where qualifying automatically for the meet requires an “A-cut.” There are two time standards for NCAA Championships, the A cut and the B cut. The A cut is an automatic cut and the B cut is a consideration time. Anyone who achieves an A cut can swim an event where they achieved a B cut. Coaches recruiting for NCAA schools cannot regularly communicate with swimmers until the summer following their junior year of high school. Athletes being recruited to an NCAA school are allowed to take five recruiting trips after July 1st following their junior year in high school. Consider taking unofficial visits to closer schools, and the official recruiting trips to schools that are farther away. If the college is interested in you, they will cover the expense of the recruiting trip. One of the primary considerations among recruiters are high school grades and the general academic ability of the swimmer. If a swimmer is awarded a scholarship, and then becomes ineligible while in college, the college team has lost a position on the team. Swimmers are expected to maintain a good grade point average while in college. If high enough, grades during the first year provides a buffer for the remaining years. The Division 1 level of collegiate swimming is the most competitive. Some conferences in this division include: Big West, Western Athletic and Pacific-10. Colleges that our swimmers are familiar with in these conferences include: Auburn, Cal Berkley, Cal Poly, CSU Bakersfield, CSU Fresno, Kentucky, Louisiana, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, UOP, UCLA, USC, Stanford, and University of Texas to name a few. Examples of “A-cuts” for the 2009 Division 1 championship meet include 19.35 and 21.93 for the men’s and women’s 50 free, 46.69 and 53.01 in the 100 back, 52.87 and 59.99 in the 100 breast, 46.04 and 52.02 in the men’s and women’s 100 fly. Long course qualifying times for D-1 schools are often faster than the Olympic Trial time standards. Division 2 schools on the west coast from the Pacific Collegiate Swim Conference include CSU San Diego, Alaska-Fairbanks and Seattle University. Division 2 Nationals are typically held in March. Drury University of Springfield, Missouri is currently the predominant Division 2 swimming school. Examples for the A-cut in D2 schools include 20.79 and 23.89 in the men’s and women’s 50 free; 50.99 and 58.09 in the 100 back; 50.29 and 57.19 in the 100 fly and 57.39 and 1:05.49 in the men’s and women’s 100 breast. Example of Division 3 schools from the Pacific Coast Conference include CSU Santa Cruz and Chapman (in Orange, CA). Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) schools that are Division 3 include California Lutheran (Thousand Oaks), Claremont Mudd-Scripts (CMS) College, La Verne, Occidental (Los Angeles), PamonaPitzer, Redlands and Whittier. The SCIAC Conference Championships are typically held in February. Top ranked schools for the SCIAC include CMS, Redlands and Pamona-Pitzer for both men’s and women’s swimming. Division 3 Championships are typically held in March, and Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio is among the top competitors in both Men’s and women’s swimming at the D-3 level.

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12 ENTERING A MEET Swimmers should feel free to approach their coach for suggestions on which meets to enter, and which events to enter for the meet. There are various levels of meets that swimmers will enter, and the process for entering meets varies depending on the location of the meet and the caliber of the meet. This page explains some variations that may occur using examples of meets. NATIONAL SENIOR MEETS (OLYMPIC TRIALS, SENIOR & JUNIOR NATIONALS, US OPEN, GRAND PRIX and SECTIONALS) Your coach will enter you in meets at these levels. He or she will communicate with you regarding which events to enter, and the entry process is typically through the On-line Meet Entry (OME) system through USA Swimming or by way of a data file. Team travel Team travel for senior meets is encouraged so swimmers can begin to learn the complexities associated with travel away from family. Travel reimbursement is based on a voluntary donation from families, and the recommended donation is $50/family with meal donations suggested at $5/breakfast and lunch and $10/dinner. Checks are made out to Tule Nation Tritons. LOCAL SENIOR MEETS (WINTER INVITE, CCS AND OTHER LSC SENIOR MEETS) Local senior meets are entered by the athlete. A paper entry (i.e. mailed in) is used. Different LSC’s use different entry cards; however, most will still accept any type of entry card. Since senior meets often require a minimum time standard to participate, the entry card usually includes space to list a “proof of time.” Entry cards from the various LSC’s can be found on the Tulare TNT web page at www.tritonswim.org. AGE GROUP CHAMPIONSHIP MEETS (AGE GROUP INVITATIONAL, FAR WESTERNS, WESTERN ZONES) Age group championship meets typically require an on-line entry method, or accept a mail-in entry as an option. To enter age-group championship meets, swimmers will either need to go to the web page of the Local Swim Committee (LSC) where the meet is being held, or use the URL (web page address) that is provided on the meet sheet. Swimmers cannot enter out-of-area age group championship meets through the CCS webpage. LOCAL A-B-C AGE GROUP MEETS AND AGE GROUP MEETS OUTSIDE OF THE LSC Local age group meets in CCS can only be entered through the CCS web page. Central California Swimming (CCS) does not accept mailed-in entries from swimmers inside the LSC. If swimmers wish to enter an age group (ABC) meet outside of CCS, they cannot use the CCS webpage, but must either use a paper entry, or go to the webpage of the LSC where the meet is hosted. Many age group meets outside of CCS only take mailedin entries. Junior Olympics in CCS is also entered by way of the on-line entry system through the CCS webpage. Swimmers enter this meet on their own. The CCS website used to enter a meet is: http://www.centralcalswim.org/LSCPortal/MeetEntryTitleCC.asp

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WHAT TO DO AT MEETS 13 WARMING UP—The warm-up is an important practice to engage in while young. It’s been noticed that when swimmers avoid warming up while young, they have difficulties adopting the practice when they’re older. The Tulare group typically warms up one hour before the start of the meet, or one hour prior to the estimated start of their event. The warm-up is typically between 1500—1800 yards. Our top swimmers often warm up again about 10-20 minutes prior to their race. As swimmers become older and gain more muscle mass, the physiological and psychological adjustments to the body resulting from an effective warm-up become more apparent. CHECKING IN WITH YOUR COACH—As swimmers become older and more experienced, they typically become more independent. As swimmers are still at the developmental stages, it’s important to understand that the purpose of a swim meet is more than simply a measure of performance, but is an integral part of the learning process. Swimmers are strongly encouraged to check in with their coach both before and after each swim. This gives the coach an opportunity to not only be advised as to which heat and lane their swimmer will compete in, but more importantly it gives the coach an opportunity to give last minute reminders about the race. Checking in with the coach after the swim gives the swimmer and coach an opportunity to review the race soon after it has taken place so that potential improvements may be addressed, or accolades given. This practice of checking in with the coach is uniform across all groups of TNT, and typically all swim teams that have age-group programs. WARMING DOWN—Similar to the warm-up, the warm-down after the race becomes more important as swimmers gain more muscle mass with age. It is imperative that swimmers adopt the habit while they are young, and not rationalize reasons not to warm down. Swimmers often warm-down between 500 to 1000 yards after races, despite whether the race was a long race or a short race. TRAINING CYCLE Most club swim programs operate within two to three training cycles, and these are often bookmarked by a culminating meet. Our cycles in Tulare revolve around USA Swimming Senior-level meets such as Nationals, Junior’s and Sectionals. The cycle helps develop focus for swimmers by helping them better identify the purpose of their efforts. Training at 100% intensity everyday in the year may be detrimental to the long term development of the athlete. Cycling up, climaxing, and then cycling down helps minimize the negative effect of expecting top performance all the time, and gives swimmers time to physiologically and psychologically recover. December Ja nu ar y t bi c e ro men Ana el o p v De February November October Aerobic Development Aerobic Development March April September An D e aer o ve bi lop c m en t May August June July

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14 BEING UNATTACHED and THE HIGH SCHOOL SEASON UNATTACHED SWIMMERS Swimmers who join a US Swim team for the first time may become attached to that team immediately. If a swimmer decides to switch teams, that swimmer may not represent the new team for 120 days (4 months). During this time the swimmer may not swim on relays or score points for either team. When switching teams, swimmers must declare that intent in writing to CCS by completing an Application for Transfer which can be found at the Central California Swimming website at http://www.centralcalswim.org/TheDrySide/Forms.asp. If this form is not completed, the swimmer will automatically be assigned to their former team once the 120 days have elapsed. While at swim meets, swimmers may typically un-attach from a team (sometimes a fee is involved), but a swimmer is not typically allowed to attach while at a meet. If a swimmer mistakenly enters a meet attached for whatever reason, they may un-attach prior to their first event. Swimmers who are in college must remain unattached from the club team until their school term is over. HIGH SCHOOL SEASON Swimming is unlike many other sports offered in high school. During the high school season, swimmers may continue to train with a club program if that allowance is permitted by the high school coach. However, during the high school season the swimmer must remain unattached at most club meets. There are some senior-level meets that are exceptions to this rule. Swimmers who are competing at the Sectional level or beyond can remain attached to their club team while at those specific meets. Swimmers must return to the unattached status when they return to competition at meets that are of lower caliber than Sectionals. The high school season for the club swimmer does not start when high school practice starts, but is determined by the first high school meet at which the swimmer participates. The club swimmer may remain attached to the club team until they have participated in their first high school meet. Violations related to representation of the club team may threaten the eligibility to participate in high school swimming.

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TNT TULARE GROUP ORGANIZATIONAL SCHEMATIC 15 The diagram on this page summarizes the various groups, the coach who trains that group, and some example of meets that are most appropriate for swimmers in that group. Some of the meets listed would be considered goals for swimmers, and the time standards for the meets can be found elsewhere in this handbook.

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