2015 SUNY Poly Faculty Research Report

 

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2015 SUNY Poly Faculty Research Report

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FACULTY RESEARCH REPORT 2014

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Founding President and Chief Executive Officer Professor of Nanoscience Alain E. Kaloyeros, Ph.D. CNSE Executive Vice President of Innovation and Technology; Vice President for Research Michael Liehr, Ph.D. SUNY Polytechnic Institute 257 Fuller Road Albany, New York 12203 www.sunycnse.com 100 Seymour Road Utica, New York 13502 www.sunypoly.edu The CNSE 2014 Annual Faculty Report is also available on the web at: http://www.sunycnse.com/LeadingEdgeResearchandDevelopment.aspx © 2015

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TABLE OF CONTENTS College of Arts and Sciences Department of Communications and Humanities Religion and Gender in Revolutionary Mexico ................................................................................... 11 Kristina A. Boylan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History Designing an Optimal Online Learning Environment ........................................................................ 13 Russell L. Kahn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication and Information Design Mediated Nostalgia ................................................................................................................................ 15 Ryan Lizardi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Digital Media Design and Humanities Exploring Innovative Ways to Teach Writing with the Disciplines ................................................... 18 Joanne Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Mary Krenitsky Perrone, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Veronica Jaris Tichenor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Community and Behavioral Health Virtual and Augmented Reality ............................................................................................................. 21 Ibrahim Yucel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication and Information Design Joanne Joseph, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Rules for Writing Rules ......................................................................................................................... 22 Ibrahim Yucel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication and Information Design Department of Computer Science A Critical Analysis of Layer 2 Network Security in Virtualized Environments ................................. 27 Ronny L. Bull, Lecturer, Computer Science Exploring Security Enhancements for Android .................................................................................. 30 William (Amos) Confer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science Automatic Facial Activity Analysis ....................................................................................................... 31 Michael Reale, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer Science

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Department of Math and Science Integration of Virtual and Real Equipment Related to Sustainability Education ............................. 34 Mark Bremer, Lecturer, Biology Quantum Field Theory and Application ............................................................................................... 42 Wenfeng Chen, Ph.D., Lecturer of Applied Mathematics Computational Mathematical Modeling; Applied Mathematics ......................................................... 44 Andrea Dziubek, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Edmond Rusjan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics Bill Thistleton, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics Physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): The Higgs Boson and the Low-Energy Quantum Chromodynamics .................................................................. 46 Amir Fariborz, Ph.D., Professor of Physics Structure-Function Studies of Prostaglandin Endoperoxide H Synthase ........................................ 54 Narayan Sharma, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry/Biochemistry Continuous Symmetries of Differential and Discrete Equations ....................................................... 57 Zora Thomova, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Psychological Science .......................................................................................................................... 60 Kazuko Y. Behrens, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology Psychology and Technology: A Global Perspective .......................................................................... 67 V.K. Kool, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Psychological Science .......................................................................................................................... 70 Paul Schulman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology Trust in the Physician and the Perception of the Quality of Care ..................................................... 72 Linda R. Weber, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology

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TABLE OF CONTENTS College of Engineering Department of Engineering Nonlinear Dynamics and Vibrations Laboratory ................................................................................. 75 Firas A. Khasawneh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Environmental Engineering .................................................................................................................. 78 Xinchao Wei, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Exploiting Control and Communications Techniques to Establish and Maintain Network Connections for Robust and Flexible Multi-Robot Coordination ....................... 80 Yu Zhou, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Department of Engineering Technology 84 HDL-Based Implementation of a Novel Dynamic Reconfigurable Data Acquisition Scheduler-on-Chip (SchoC) ..................................................................................... Mohammed Abdallah, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Technology 85 A Novel Securely Remote USB Connection Image and its Applications on Online Learning for Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology ........................................... Mohammed Abdallah, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Technology Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Moving Random Media ................................................................... 87 William W. Durgin, Ph.D., Provost; Chief Operating Officer Nitride Semiconductor Research ......................................................................................................... 89 Iulian Gherasoiu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Technology “e-student” Remote Laboratory Experiments ..................................................................................... 91 Daniel Jones, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology Mohammed Abdallah, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Technology

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TABLE OF CONTENTS College of Nanoscale Sciences Nanobioscience Constellation Sensors, Components, and Mitigators of Stress and Damage Signaling ........................................ 95 Thomas Begley, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience; Associate Vice President and Director of the Systems Toxicology Laboratory Bio-derived Nanomaterials for Nanomedicine and Characterization of iCVD-Polymers for Surface Modification and Low-Temperature Bonding ...................................... 99 Magnus Bergkvist, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety of Engineered Nanomaterials ...................... 104 Sara Brenner, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Vice President for NanoHealth Initiatives; Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience Nanobiotechnology, Biosensors & Bio-Inspired Devices ................................................................. 115 Nathaniel Cady, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Wafer Processing and Nanobioscience Research ............................................................................. 122 James Castracane, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Nanobioscience Constellation Molecular Toxicology & Nano-Drug Development ............................................................................. 130 Xinxin Ding, Ph.D., Professor of Nanobioscience Constellation; Director of Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology; and Director of Center for Preclinical Nano-Drug Discovery and Development Genomic Profiling of Yeast Resistance to P450-activated Carcinogens ......................................... 137 Michael Fasullo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Cancer Metastasis ............................................................... 140 Nadine Hempel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience Nanobioscience ..................................................................................................................................... 145 J. Andres Melendez, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Head, Nanobioscience Constellation Nanomachines, Cancer Therapy, and Human Stem Cell Bioengineering ....................................... Janet Paluh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience 151

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Mammalian and Microbial Cell Bioprocessing ................................................................................... 156 Susan Sharfstein, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience RNA-Based Nanotechnology ................................................................................................................ 166 Scott Tenenbaum, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Nanobioengineering Stem Cell Technology ....................................................................................... 171 Yubing Xie, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Nanoscience Constellation Ion Beam Laboratory ............................................................................................................................. 175 Hassaram Bakhru, Ph.D., Distinguished Service Professor and Head, Nanoscience Constellation Mengbing Huang, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoscience EUV Research Projects ......................................................................................................................... 182 Robert Brainard, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience Characterization, Metrology, and Physics of Nanoscale Materials and Structures ........................ 189 Alain Diebold, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Science; Empire Innovation Professor of Nanoscale Science; Executive Director, Center for Nanoscale Metrology; Executive Director, NC3 Defects and Microstructural Engineering ............................................................................................ 196 Kathleen Dunn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoscience Nanomaterials for Emerging Electronics, Renewable Energy, and Flexible Electronics Applications ................................................................................................. 199 Eric Eisenbraun, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoscience Nanoscale Schottky Barrier Mapping .................................................................................................. 200 Vincent Labella, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis .................................................................. 201 Eric Lifshin, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience; Director, Metrology & Electron Imaging Facilities; Co-Director, Center for Advanced Interconnect Science & Technology (CAIST)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Reliability of Nanostructured Materials ............................................................................................... 203 James Lloyd, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Professor X-Ray Metrology: Advances in Methods and Applications ................................................................ 209 Richard Matyi, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience Compound Semiconductor Research .................................................................................................. 215 Serge Oktyabrsky, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience Nanoscale Characterization and Metrology ........................................................................................ 223 Bradley Thiel, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoscience College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation Nanoeconomics Constellation PROGRAM: iCLEAN, SUNY Poly’s Energy and Nanotechnology Incubator .................................... 226 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Laura Schultz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics INITIATIVE: New York Business Plan Competition ............................................................................. 228 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Laura Schultz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics INITIATIVE: Tech Valley Innovation Pipeline ....................................................................................... 230 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Laura Schultz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics PROGRAM: eNTEL ................................................................................................................................. 232 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Laura Schultz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Economics of Nanomanufacturing Industries .................................................................................... 234 Unni Pillai, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics Creating Economic Impact with Emerging Technologies .................................................................. 238 Laura Schultz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics Nanoengineering Constellation Nanoscale Semiconductor Device Processing and Simulation ........................................................ 240 Christopher Borst, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering; Associate Vice President for G450C Technical Operations Chemical Sensors .................................................................................................................................. 243 Michael Carpenter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering Lithography ............................................................................................................................................ 248 Gregory Denbeaux, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering Photovoltaics, Li-ion Batteries ............................................................................................................. 251 Harry Efstathiadis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Si-NanoMaterials and Nanosystems Research Group ....................................................................... 255 Spyridon (Spyros) Galis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Nanoengineering PROGRAM: U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium ............................................................... 258 Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PROGRAM: ASPIRE (NSF AIR) ............................................................................................................. 259 John Hartley, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Nanoengineering Constellation; Director, Advanced Lithography Center Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY PROGRAM: NICE-IP (NSF PFI) .............................................................................................................. 262 Harry Efstathiadis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY Advanced Lithography Group .............................................................................................................. 264 John Hartley, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Nanoengineering Constellation; Director, Advanced Lithography Center Carrier Transport in Nanoscale Materials and Devices ..................................................................... 268 Ji Ung Lee, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoengineering Demonstrating 2X Performance Enhancement in Energy Density of Lithium Ion Capacitor (LIC) Over State-of-the-Art ......................................................................... 269 Manisha Rane-Fondacaro, Ph.D., Instructor Pradeep Haldar, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the College of Nanoscale Engineering and Technology Innovation; CNSE Vice President of Entrepreneurship Innovation and Clean Energy Programs; Head, Nanoeconomics Constellation; Professor; Director, E2TAC; Executive Director, NENY III-Nitride Wide Bandgap Opto/Electronics Materials and Devices ................................................... 271 Fatemeh (Shadi) Shahedipour-Sandvik, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nanoengineering Nano-Inspired Device Research ........................................................................................................... 279 Bin Yu, Ph.D., Professor of Nanoengineering

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Highlighting the world-class capabilities of SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s research ecosystem as it supports the rapid expansion of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s innovation economy in New York State, it is my pleasure to present the 2014 edition of SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Faculty Research Report. SUNY Poly has emerged as a single institution from the merger between the SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Albany and the SUNY Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) in Utica. SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering’s (SUNY Poly CNSE) mission is to serve as an intellectually vibrant powerhouse for research and education in the nanotechnology disciplines, from theoretical principles to practical applications. This mission is carried out through cutting-edge work that is being undertaken by faculty and staff each day at SUNY Poly CNSE’s unmatched $20 billion Albany NanoTech Complex. With its unique, publicly led public-private partnership model providing access to 300 mm and 450 mm wafer processing capabilities, SUNY Poly CNSE is fueling next-generation semiconductor-based research, with the ability to quickly and efficiently integrate discoveries into advanced manufacturing processes. This true “lab to fab” capability accelerates innovation and controls costs, even as the research and development environment becomes increasingly complex. Research at SUNY Poly’s Utica campus spans disciplines ranging from technology, including engineering and cybersecurity, computer science, and the engineering technologies; professional studies, including business, communication, and nursing; and arts and sciences, including mathematics, natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Faculty members at both campuses are active scholars, publish regularly, and are internationally known in their fields. SUNY Poly’s globally recognized resources, know-how, and capabilities enable a bright future for economic development, education, research, development, and commercialization based on the leading-edge work of faculty, staff, and students. Their combined efforts are leading to ultra-fast and secure data; the improved detection, treatment, and prevention of diseases such as cancer or diabetes; increasingly efficient clean energy applications; and a greater understanding of physics, mathematics, and human behavior, for example. Simply put, SUNY Poly is an engine for 21st Century research. In fact, the National Science Foundation recently ranked SUNY Poly as the number one college/university in the United States in 2013 for research expenditures funded by business, with $201.6 million in research and development expenditures derived from more than 300 corporate and business partners, topping MIT, Duke, and Stanford. The 2014 Faculty Research Report highlights key areas of SUNY Poly’s educational and research efforts: »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» Business Management Communications and Humanities Computer and Information Sciences Engineering, Science & Mathematics Engineering Technology Nanobioscience Nanoeconomics Nanoengineering Nanoscience Social and Behavioral Sciences We hope that SUNY Poly’s 2014 Faculty Research Report will provide a valuable glimpse into our exciting research, development, commercialization, and deployment efforts that are yielding powerful results. Michael Liehr CNSE Executive Vice President of Innovation and Technology; Vice President for Research

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES www.sunypoly.edu www.sunycnse.com

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  Department of Communications & Humanities Religion and Gender in Revolutionary Mexico (Kristina A. Boylan) Scope: My ongoing research agenda critically examines the roles played by Catholic laywomen in social movements and debates in revolutionary Mexico. This contributes to a growing body of literature recognizing the importance of grassroots organizing across the ideological spectrum in shaping Mexico’s domestic politics and international relations. Though excluded on the basis of their sex from official positions of power in Church and government, activist women contributed significantly to the reconstruction of the Catholic social movement in Mexico following the Cristero Rebellion and to the diminution or abandonment of several radical aspects of the 1917 Constitution, its operating laws, and corresponding state and local policies. Goals: To maintain an active research agenda oriented toward producing articles, monographs, and other scholarly works. 2014 Accomplishments TOPIC 1: “Virgin of Guadalupe,” entry for Eric Zolov, ed., Iconic Mexico: Encyclopedia from Acapulco to Zócalo (USA: ABC-CLIO, Aug. 2015) An This encyclopedia article was submitted to the editor of the collection in June 2013; I submitted revisions to the text in April 2014. Also, at the request of the editor (Associate Professor of History at Stony Brook University), I submitted three proposals for a primary source document related to this entry, including originally-composed introductions (which will receive author credit) from which “Graham Greene, ‘The Dark Virgin,’ was selected. Figure 1: Listing for the forthcoming publication can be viewed at http://www.amazon.com/IconicMexico-volumes-Encyclopedia-Acapulco/dp/1610690435/ TOPIC 2: “The Impact of Mexican Catholic Women’s Grassroots Programs: Educational Campaigns and Community Monitoring in the Archdiocese of Guadalajara, 1934-1940,” article submitted to The Americas, June 2014. This is the revised text of a conference paper presented in March 2010 and originally solicited for inclusion in an edited collection of essays (inability to fund the document’s being professionally translated when a US-based publication offer fell through and a Mexico-based publication offer emerged led to its being taken out of the collection). I revised the manuscript for submission to The Americas (http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TAM). In December 2014 I received a request to make minor revisions and re-submit the article for consideration, which I am working on timing for the editorial board’s next meeting at the end of March 2015. 11

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  Department of Communications & Humanities TOPIC 3: With co-author Gregory Swedberg, ongoing research project, “Engendering or Revealing a New Cardenista Contract? Leonor Sanchez, Workers, and the Negotiation of Church-State Tensions in 1937 Veracruz, Mexico.” Dr. Swedberg (Manhattanville College) traveled to Mexico this past summer, and located materials in historical archives in Xalapa and Orizaba that we are using to continue our research project on the details and impact of the incident of Sanchez’s death and subsequent religiously-oriented protests in Veracruz in 1937. Earlier work on this project was supported by SUNYIT’s Visiting Scholar program in March 2012; we presented preliminary findings at the Latin American Studies Association conference in Washington, DC in June 2012. Dr. Swedberg has invited me to present our research at Manhattanville College on March 26, 2015, supported by a similar fund at that institution. We are currently reviewing the primary source documents and preparing the presentation, with the goal of strengthening our existing paper to the necessary level of documentation and analytical rigor for journal publication. TOPIC 4: Interdisciplinary Understandings of Food in Society, Kristina A. Boylan (2d research area): With Xinchao Wei (SUNY Poly), Principal investigator, Andrew Wolfe, Laura Weiser-Erlandson, and myself, “Design and Build A Sustainable Bus Stop Shelter: Project-based Learning to Integrate Sustainability into Educational Programs at SUNYIT,” SUNY Small Grant Sustainability Fund Application, submitted Dec. 2013, awarded $6,100 April 2014. Dr. Wei invited me to participate in this project, as the instructor of an interdisciplinary course examining the science, technology, and human values of food in society (IDS 103). The co-authors intended to implement assignments in several courses (engineering, for Wei and Wolfe, biology, for Weiser-Erlandson, and IDS 103, for myself) in order to involve students in the design, construction, and furnishing of a bus stop shelter powered by renewable energy sources. Based on my IDS 103 class, service-based learning projects involving starting seedlings for community gardens (2011 and 2013-present), my role was to identify plant species that could survive (or periodically be raised and re-planted) in a living garden wall that would form part of the shelter, and to implement that project into a class in Fall Semester 2014. Dr. Wei and I are continuing our discussions of how to design and implement student-centered projects that integrate assignments and ideas from natural sciences, environmental engineering, and interdisciplinary social science and humanities perspectives. 12

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  Department of Communications & Humanities Designing an Optimal Online Learning Environment (Russell L. Kahn, Ph.D.) Scope: Qualitative research found that students in a given class exhibited multiple learning styles from teacher-centered to student-centered. The study found that students preferred academic activities that appealed to a range of learning styles. Goals: Provide a model for designing courses that appeals to the widest range of learning styles 2014 Accomplishments TOPIC 1: A Taxonomy for Choosing, Evaluating, and Integrating In-the-Cloud Resources in a University Environment Developed and applied an analytic matrix for searching and using Web 2.0 resources along a learning continuum based on learning styles. This continuum applied core concepts of cognitive psychology, which placed an emphasis on internal processes, such as motivation, thinking, attitudes, and reflection. A pilot study found that access to multiple media and enhanced graphical tools in an online classroom responds to students’ varied learning styles. This research applies Bloom’s Taxonomy of learning styles to explain the matrix. It presents preliminary evidence that indicates how use of multiple resources works to include more learning styles and thus engage and motivate more students. Table 2: Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy with sample in-the-cloud applications Learning Remembering Understanding Applying Evaluating Style Analyzing Examples Sharing Visualizing, Mashing, Moderating information interpreting, playing discussions Sample Webinars, Wikis, Lexipedia, Discussion Discussion Applications Wikipedia Tagxedo, Wordle, Journals replies Google Prezi, TED talks Mashpedia Jing Docs IceRocket annotate Silobreaker Slideshare Creating Students produce/direct Prezi, Jing Video 2014 Highlights: • Publication in two peer reviewed journals o Journal of Education and Technology Systems (Volume 41 Number 2) o Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Professional Communication • Membership on the SUNY-wide FACT2 committee • Named Senior fellow and mentor for Open SUNY • Thesis advisor on the subject of online learning for eight thesis projects 13

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