MMSCN 2013-2014 Annual Report

 

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Annual Report of the MMSCN to MDE

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2013-2014 Annual Report Building tomorrow’s citizens by inspiring excellence in mathematics and science education today. Prepared by Science and Mathematics Program Improvement (SAMPI) Western Michigan University

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Science and Mathematics Program Improvement (SAMPI) Mallinson Institute for Science Education Western Michigan University REVISED March 2015 Technical Assistance Team Kristin Everett, Ph.D. Crystal Stein, B.A. Mark Jenness, Ed.D. Mary Anne Sydlik, Ph.D. Supported by Tessa Souers, M.P.A. Robert Ruhf, Ph.D. For more information about the Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network, contact: Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network Executive Board Phone: 269-686-5087 aoliver@alleganaesa.org Amy Oliver, President Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network Executive Board Phone: 734-612-8780 mary@starrscience.com Mary Starr, Executive Director www.mimathandscience.org For more information about this report, contact: SAMPI—Western Michigan University Phone: 269-387-2417 Email: kristin.everett@wmich.edu Kristin Everett SAMPI—Western Michigan University Phone: 269-387-2422 Email: crystal.stein@wmich.edu Crystal Stein SAMPI—Western Michigan University Phone: 269-387-2421 Email: mark.jenness@wmich.edu Mark Jenness SAMPI—Western Michigan University Phone: 269-387-5393 Email: maryanne.sydlik@wmich.edu Mary Anne Sydlik 2 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network Building tomorrow’s citizens by inspiring excellence in mathematics and science education today. The Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network is a primary infrastructure supporting the improvement of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in Michigan. Programs and services of the thirty-three Mathematics and Science Centers are made available to all Michigan public and private schools in their service areas. The following report summarizes the work of the Network during the 2013-2014 school year. Individual Centers produce an annual report of accomplishments, which are available from each Center. What’s Inside? Highlights of 2013-14.................................................................................................................... 5 Statewide Projects......................................................................................................................... 6 Value of Statewide Projects.....................................................................................................6 PRIME Highlights........................................................................................................................7 SaM³ Year 4 Major Accomplishments.................................................................................8 ® Intel Math MSP Highlights...................................................................................................... 10 Progress Toward Accomplishing MMSCN Master Plan Goals.......................................... 12 Focus Area 1: Career- and College-Ready Students.......................................................12 Focus Area 2: Facilitate the Development of Michigan STEM Partnership...........14 Innovative Student Programs................................................................................................... 16 Priority Schools............................................................................................................................ 18 Professional Learning.................................................................................................................20 Student Services..........................................................................................................................22 Leadership..................................................................................................................................... 25 Curriculum Support....................................................................................................................26 Community and Parent Engagement...................................................................................... 27 Resource Clearinghouse............................................................................................................. 28 Leveraged Resources..................................................................................................................30 Appendix ....................................................................................................................................... 31 Meeting State and National Goals....................................................................................... 31 Highlights of Annual Pre/Post Teacher and Student Participant Assessment Data.............................................................................. 32 Table 1: Professional Learning Participants....................................................................33 Table 2: Professional Learning Activities........................................................................ 34 Table 3: Student Services Activities...................................................................................35 Table 4: Fifteen Year Summary Data—TEACHERS....................................................... 36 Table 5: Fifteen Year Summary Data—STUDENTS....................................................... 37 Directory of M/S Centers............................................................................................................ 38 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 3

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26 A Years of Service to Michigan Schools In the 26 years of its existence, the Network has provided programs and services to teachers, students, schools, and communities across Michigan. The Mathematics and Science Centers Program was created by legislation in 1988, providing grant funds to establish Centers in cooperation with local and intermediate school districts and higher education institutions. Today, all school districts across Michigan have access in their region to one of 33 M/S Centers. lthough the Network has actively sought and been awarded grants, Mathematics and Science Centers continue to provide quality programming for teachers and students to improve STEM education in Michigan despite more than a decade of reductions in base funding from the State School Aid Act-Section 99. Although the Network and Centers have actively sought grants, contracts, and in-kind contributions to support programming, the overall 80% decrease in state funding levels since 2002 have resulted in fewer professional learning hours for teachers, fewer STEM program hours for students, and decreases in other support services. A return to fullfunding would allow the Centers and Network to more adequately address the STEM education needs of Michigan students, teachers, and schools. 4 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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Impacts and Opportunities The Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network offered programs and services to thousands of teachers and their students, all designed to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics and science. This was the eleventh year of significantly reduced funding from the Michigan Legislature, which necessitated reductions in programming. The 33 Centers continued to provide public and private schools in their regions with various student services, teacher professional learning, curriculum, leadership, community partnership, and resource sharing programs. Below are highlights from the annual report of the Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network. Readers are encouraged to review the entire report. Information about the Network is available from Amy Oliver, President (aoliver@alleganaesa.org), Mary Starr, Executive Director (mary@starrscience.com), or www.mimathandscience.org. Highlights from the 2013-14 Annual Report In addition to the many regular local and regional activities, the Network facilitated two multi-year statewide projects serving Michigan teachers and their students: Science and Mathematics Misconceptions Management (SaM3) Promoting Reform in Mathematics Education (PRIME) • 10,582 teachers and other educators participated in programs, including: 143 individuals teaching pre-K, 4,378 teaching elementary, 1,762 teaching middle/jr. high, 2,015 teaching high school, 1,030 teaching mixed grade levels, and 1,254 identified as others (administrators, parapros, etc.). • 2,235 professional learning (PL) programs were offered: 1,139 in math, 746 in science, 56 in technology, 47 in engineering, and 247 in other topics. • A total of 12,301 hours of PL were provided; 31,274 total PL enrollments. • 77,367 students participated in Center programs: 239 pre-K, 47,021 elementary, 10,916 elementary and middle/ jr. high, 5,261 middle/jr. high, 6,805 middle/jr. high and high school, 4,364 high school, and 2,761 from mixed grade levels (some students may have attended multiple programs). • Over the past 15 years, 33,551 PL programs were offered; total enrollment in 15 years was 493,715 (many teachers participated multiple years in multiple programs). • In the same 15 year period, 2,748,811 students were served directly by Centers (some students were served multiple years in more than one program). • Five Centers provided innovative outreach and accelerated high school programs to meet student needs in their service areas. These highly motivating math and science programs are not otherwise available to schools. • Centers targeted Priority Schools, providing intensive assistance including: classroom-level professional learning, classroom observations to identify areas of need, modeling science lessons, targeted small group PL, content integration advice, assessment assistance, achievement gap analysis, and resource acquisition. • PRIME & PRIME Plus: Recipient of the “2013 Best of the Best” by the Michigan Association of School Boards, PRIME was designated as “Exemplary” in its use of research by the US Office of Education (USOE). At the 2014 MSP National Conference in Washington, DC, the Assistant Secretary of Education selected and highlighted PRIME as one of two programs out of the 455 currently funded projects. As a result, the PRIME leadership was one of three projects selected to participate in the Design Based Implementation Research (DBIR) pilot project sponsored by USOE. More information on this statewide effort can be found on page 7 of this report. • In the final year of programming, SaM3 served 90 middle and high school mathematics and science teachers through a special statewide professional learning initiative. Nineteen (19) math and science teachers benefited from three years of intensive, sustained professional learning. SaM3 has provided professional development to a total of 125 mathematics teachers and 104 science teachers since the beginning of the project. More information on this statewide project can be found on pages 8-9 of this report. Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 5

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Value Project PRIME Education) of Michigan Statewide Projects The 33 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers have functioned as a collaborative Network since their inception in 1988. Recent years have been marked by an increased number of statewide projects. The Network provides professional learning or student activities to target the needs of teachers, students, schools and districts across the state. The Network has become an essential means of communication between organizations, like the MDE, Michigan teachers, and students. Statewide Projects in 2013-2014: (Promoting Reform in Mathematics SaM3 (Science and Mathematics Misconceptions Management) Network statewide projects: • Provide research-based, ready-to-implement curriculum and professional learning opportunities. • Focus on topics and issues important to teachers and the state. • Address the needs of students and teachers. • Connect local teachers to a broader network of teachers. • Allow the collection of student and teacher data. • Lend credibility and urgency to the nature of the content presented. • Provide financial support for substitutes and instructional materials. • Allow teachers to remain up-to-date with the latest information. • Give teachers the opportunity to step outside the role of teacher and experience a leadership role. • Bring resource materials into the hands of teachers. Other aspects of Network statewide projects: • Economy-of-scale allows Centers to share resources and planning. All Centers, regardless of size, are able to offer instructional services that may not otherwise happen. Limited resources are used more efficiently. • Centers have opportunities to collaborate and network with each other. They look beyond themselves and focus on the needs of others across the state. • Centers and teachers have opportunities to build and strengthen relationships with universities and ISDs. • Increased visibility as a network and as individual Centers in the community. • Increased communication with local principals, curriculum directors, teachers, etc. • Teachers learn and implement new technology such as Nspire calculators. • Centers have cadres of teachers “speaking the same language” and willing to share instructional strategies, successes, and failures. 6 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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Promoting Reform in Mathematics Education (PRIME) 2013-2014 Highlights I n 2014, PRIME was designated as “Exemplary” in its use of research by the US Office of Education (USOE). In her plenary speech at the 2014 MSP National Conference in Washington, DC, the Assistant Secretary of Education selected PRIME as one of two programs she highlighted out of the 455 currently funded projects. Because of this recognition, the PRIME leadership was one of three projects selected to participate in the Design Based Implementation Research (DBIR) pilot project sponsored by USOE. P RIME is an intense professional learning program that builds algebra content with pedagogical knowledge of middle and high school teachers to ensure that mathematics classroom instruction meets the learning needs of all students. In 2013-2014, twelve Mathematics and Science Centers at fourteen sites across the state served more than 627 middle and high school mathematics teachers through a consortium of partners: Wayne RESA’s Mathematics and Science Center (Wayne RESA), the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and the Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network (MMSCN). Fourteen percent of school teams received coaching with classroom visits from their coach a quarter of a day per month for four months. All teachers had the opportunity to participate in up to five afterschool meetings during the school year. The evaluation design included pre/post performance of teachers on the Learning for Mathematics Teaching Scale (LMT), focus groups conducted at five sites across the state, surveys, and a sample of 44 teachers statewide provided pre/post classroom videos in a three-year pilot using the Mathematical Quality of Instruction (MQI) Protocol in order to examine implementation of project strategies in classrooms. Interview data was collected from the video pilot participants and the project leadership team, including facilitators and site directors. Project Findings LMT results indicated tremendous growth during the first project year in 2011-2012 which was augmented with significant gains at six sites in 2013-2014. Self-reported indicators of teacher pedagogical practices also indicated significant improvement. Findings from the 2013-2014 data indicate for the first time during the project that effects of coaching were identifiable. The multi-layered nature of collaboration within PRIME as described by facilitators is evident in the NVivo word tree in Figure 1. Read the tree by beginning at the left and following through to the right. Collaboration among Mathematics and Science Centers, within school teams, across districts, and throughout the state through Learnport resulted in human resource capital building from many perspectives. both sites benefitted from the It definintely helped facilitate PRIME facilitated Totally helped network Text Search Query Results Preview COLLABORATION ,helped teachers us the practices .direct application of new learning. and really rich discussions and staff in one school teachers and between schools between the teachers. The real in its statewide scope. As increases the effectiveness of lesson participants created a nucleus of with teachers from different school No hindering, increased possible revisions to the lessons. who had shared projects. Through Figure 1. Graphic tree for the word “collaboration” as used by PRIME Facilitators Looking Ahead to 2014-2015 The 2014-2015 overall goal is to continue to support districts in Wayne County and throughout Michigan. A DBIR pilot using school improvement plans as a vehicle for building local professional development goals aligned with PRIME will provide a research base for field testing the process in a broad base of schools in 2015-2016. For more information about PRIME, please contact Libby Pizzo, Wayne RESA M/S Center director, PizzoL@resa.net. For more information about the evaluation of PRIME, please contact Dr. Frederica Frost, Center for Evaluation Research, FrostF@resa.net. Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 7

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Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network Michigan Department of Education SaM3 (Science and Mathematics Misconceptions Management) STATEWIDE PROJECT Accomplishments of SaM3—Year 4 Science and Mathematics Misconceptions Management T he goals of the 2010-2014 MMSCN and MDE four-year Science and Mathematics Misconceptions Management (SaM3) grant program were to increase the content and pedagogy knowledge of 7th-12th grade mathematics and science teachers and to increase teacher awareness of student misconceptions of content in the two disciplines. The program focused on the provision of professional learning (PL) to two groups of teachers in the statewide SaM3 Program: • A core group of teachers providing instruction in schools designated by the MDE as “Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools” in Michigan participated as Long Term Schools over the four year grant period, (Cohort 1). Long-Term School teacher teams in Cohort 1 met each summer for a one-day summer conference to share their year of learning and plan for the next year of Professional Learning Communities (PLC). • Teacher teams from schools that identified a need to reform math and science instruction in their School Improvement Plans received one year of state SaM3 PL and PLCs (Cohort 2 and Cohort 3). Over the course of the four-year grant cycle, each of 33 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers had the opportunity to send a teacher team of 6 math and 6 science teachers in grades 7-12 to the statewide SaM3 professional learning program. These teacher teams participated in a five-day SaM3 Summer Institute and in six full-day PLCs in their home school district, during the school year, with targeted outcomes of: • Increased core content knowledge, with an instructional context of Fractions (math) and Energy (science) across the disciplines • Increased core content knowledge, with instructional contexts of Formative Assessment and Models in Mathematics and Science, for Cohort 1 teachers during 2012-13 and 2013-14 (Long Term Schools) • Increased understanding of content knowledge and student misconceptions in the teacher’s content area • Implementation of strategies to student misconceptions and teach for understanding • Development of usable lesson plans to address student misconceptions in their classroom • Ability to analyze student work for understanding • Consistent and timely feedback on instruction and student understanding 8 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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STATEWIDE PROJECT O n June 18, 2014, three cohorts of teacher teams, as well as Math/Science Center directors and Center SaM3 facilitators, came together to share professional learning in the statewide SaM3 Summit in Lansing. Teachers and facilitators made presentations on SaM3 instructional strategies and topics, with an inspiring keynote speech on “Joy, Inc.” by Rich Sheridan, CEO of Menlo Incorporated. A website site was also developed at the end of the project: misam3.weebly.com. In the 2012-13 and 2013-14 years of the grant program, Math/ Science Centers received funding to implement a Regional Tier 2 SaM3 training, increasing their outreach to teachers in their Center’s service area. This Tier 2 funding supplemented the statewide funding that each Center received to send a teacher team of twelve to statewide professional learning programs during three years of SaM3 Summer Institutes and statefacilitator-led PLCs. For more information about SaM3, please contact Pam Bunch, SaM3 project manager, Pam.Bunch@lisd.us. Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 9

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Michigan Mathematics and Science Partnership Grants Greater Proficiency in Mathematics II (GPM-II): Upper Peninsula Mathematics and Science Partnership (UPMSP) Supporting the Implementation of Intel Math II (SI2M-II): SVSU Regional Mathematics and Science Center ® M ichigan Mathematics and Science Partnerships. The Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network has collaborated with institutions of higher education and other partners to implement Michigan Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) projects over the past several years. Nearly all Centers (91%) have participated in one or more MSPs. Several Centers are currently involved in these partnerships and more have been proposed to the Michigan Department of Education. The Michigan MSP grant program requires active participation of one or more Centers in a project. Two Math Partnerships focused on the Intel® Math Program. The Greater Proficiency in Mathematics II (GPMII) was an MSP grant that supported the development of a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts among elementary and middle school teachers across the Upper Peninsula. The primary components of the program were: (1) the implementation of content specific workshops in partnership with the Intel® Math program and (2) the Mathematics Learning Communities program, a companion program to Intel® Math. Supporting the Implementation of Intel® Math II (SI2M-II) MSP grant supported the development of a deeper understanding of mathematics content and pedagogy among elementary and middle school teachers around Saginaw Valley State University and across the Lower Peninsula. For more information about the external evaluation of the GPM-II and SI2M-II Intel® Math programs, please contact Dr. Robert Ruhf at robert.ruhf@wmich.edu or 269-387-5390. “Everything had a context to it rather than just being a series of problems over and over.” GPM-II Teacher GPM-II Intel® Math Teachers’ experiences with the Intel materials: ® How students’ opportunities to learn were impacted, reported by teachers: “I have enhanced my teaching of math by allowing my students to explain through their voices how they solved problems. This gives them a better chance to learn from one another.” “My confidence is greater; I think it must rub off on them. They tell me that it’s okay to struggle.” “I question their answers more now than I ever did. Now I ask them, ‘How do you know?’ The whole program makes you question their thinking.” “I was opened up to thinking more broadly.” “They make good use of vocabulary and have thought-provoking problems.” “Everything had a context to it rather than just being a series of problems over and over.” 10 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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“I think I have developed a passion for math. I never thought I would say that! And that is passed along to my students. My students are more successful this year than any other year.” SI2M-II Teacher SI2M-II Intel® Math Teachers’ experiences with the Intel materials: ® “I like the core principles that Intel® Math stresses. For example, solving in different forms/ways, cooperative learning, and purposeful struggle.” “It has been rigorous. It has helped me to understand student struggles.” “It frustrated me to the point of understanding.” How students’ opportunities to learn were impacted, reported by teachers: “I have more patience with them not understanding how to complete a problem.” “I think I have developed a passion for math. I never thought I would say that! And that is passed along to my students. My students are more successful this year than any other year.” “I am also starting to use a different style: it’s not just ‘explain and do’ anymore.” Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 11

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20132014 Progress Toward Accomplishing MMSCN Master Plan Goals A five-year MMSCN Master Plan (2013-2017) guides programs and services. Below are highlights of accomplishments for 2013-2014 related to the plan’s two focus areas. Focus Area 1: Career- and College-Ready Students The Network continues its 26-year history of providing high quality professional learning experiences for Michigan teachers so they can more effectively prepare career- and college-ready students in STEM fields. Here are brief summaries of accomplishments related to the five goals for this focus area. • Provide substantive teacher professional learning in STEM subject areas, helping teachers focus on the best ways to improve student career and college readiness. MMSCN continued to provide substantive professional learning across the entire Network in STEM subject matter, curriculum standards, instruction and classroom practices, and student engagement strategies. These STEM programs—in the form of summer institutes, year-long workshop series, job-embedded activities, and/or online sessions—were designed to help teachers prepare their students for careers and college. In 2013-2014, 10,582 teachers and other educators participated in professional learning; 2,235 programs were offered (1,139 in math, 746 in science, 56 in technology, 47 in engineering, and 347 in other STEM education-related topics). This represents an average of 17.7 hours per teacher participant. • Provide teacher professional learning to increase knowledge and understanding of curriculum content expectations in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. MMSCN professional learning programs focus on STEM subject matter and include training in the use of curriculum materials and instructional strategies related to the subjects. Examples of projects that served teachers across Michigan included: PRIME (teaching and learning of algebra in middle and high school); Intel® Math (designed to increase elementary and middle school teachers’ understanding of math concepts and effective instructional strategies to teach the concepts); and SaM3 (a multi-year project designed to help 7th-12th grade teachers address student misconceptions about science and mathematics content). About 1,100 teachers received intensive and sustained professional learning in these three programs. Many other STEM professional learning programs were offered by individual Center or clusters of Centers, including initiation of a multi-Center Mathematics/Science Partnership, Modeling Instruction in High School Physics and Chemistry program. • Assess effects of professional learning on teacher participants as it relates to subject matter and pedagogical content knowledge, classroom/instructional practices, and dispositions consistent with STEM learning. Various assessment strategies were used by Centers in 2013-2014 to evaluate effects of professional learning on teachers, ranging from classroom observations to teacher subject matter tests to teacher surveys to end-of-session questionnaires, depending on data needs and available human and financial resources. Statewide projects and Mathematics/Science Partnership grants had external evaluators able to gather various kinds of impact data. Evaluation of these sustained professional learning efforts showed improvements in teacher STEM content knowledge, understanding of curriculum materials and standards, and use of effective instructional strategies. As an example of assessment results, see the top of the next page which summarizes effects of PRIME on teacher participants (the middle and high school statewide algebra project). More extensive evaluation findings for MMSCN STEM professional learning are available from project directors. 12 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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Focus Area 1: Career- and College-Ready Students (continued) Summary Evaluation Findings from PRIME Results of a pre/post administration of the Learning Mathematics Teaching assessment of participating teachers over the course of PRIME showed a statistically significant positive change in overall scores (matched pairs and significance at p ≤ .05). Self-reported indicators of teacher pedagogical practices also indicated significant improvement. A sample of lesson videos from participating teachers (part of a pilot study) was scored using a Math Quality of Instruction Protocol to determine the nature of classroom implementation of project strategies. Small group and individual interviews were also used to gather qualitative data. Analysis of Michigan standardized test scores was done on available district/school-level data. Evaluation of effects of professional learning continues to be a challenge, primarily because of inadequate human and financial resources to carry out more in-depth assessments of STEM programming. Planning has begun to develop a feasible cross-Network professional learning evaluation framework to gather data about program effects. Piloting will begin in spring 2015. • Within Network statewide professional learning projects, assess impact of programming on students related to the subject matter of the project and dispositions consistent with STEM learning and careers. Evaluation of selected statewide projects and Mathematics/Science Partnership grants included assessment of changes in student STEM content knowledge, STEM-related skills, and attitudes/dispositions toward STEM. Sample findings include: • In classrooms where teachers use what they learned in professional learning sessions, students have opportunities to learn STEM subjects in new and more effective ways. For example, teachers of mathematics have learned strategies to help students construct arguments for their ideas and critique the reasoning of others, consistent with the Michigan standards for mathematics. • In Intel® Math grant-funded projects, evaluators found statistically significant positive changes across 3rd-7th grade students in scores on project-specific math content tests (at p ≤ .05). • Provide and assess programming to build career and college awareness in STEM fields, especially in elementary grades, such as Family Engineering and other awareness-building programs. MMSCN continued to provide direct student programming to build awareness of STEM learning and careers among Pre-K through 5th grade students. In 2013-2014, 47,260 students in these grade levels participated directly in Network programs. A total of 2,207 hours of programming was provided. Over the past two years, Centers across Michigan facilitated Family Engineering sessions for Lower Elementary students and their parents (8,084 participants). This program provides opportunities for students and parents to actively engage in fun hands-on investigative activities that illustrate engineering design and problem-solving. An intended outcome of the program is to increase awareness of students and parents about potential careers in Engineering and related STEM fields. Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 13

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20132014 Progress Toward Accomplishing MMSCN Master Plan Goals Focus Area 2: Facilitate the Development of Michigan STEM Partnership The Network continued to collaborate with the Michigan STEM Partnership to work together to advance STEM learning and economic development in Michigan. • Continue coordination and implementation of the Michigan STEM Partnership by the Network. MMSCN provided leadership at the state and hub level in 2013-2014 to strengthen the STEM Partnership. Center Directors served on Hub Leadership Teams and the Michigan STEM Partnership Board. The Network provided time at its quarterly meetings for Directors to meet in Hub groups for review of accomplishments and planning for future meetings and events. The Network helped set goals and define roles for the Network and STEM Partnership. A protocol for systematics and consistent collection of activity data was piloted. • Seek additional funding for the STEM Partnership to support core operations and special projects. The Network helped facilitate development of office and fiscal procedures for efficient and effective operation of the Partnership, created memos of understanding for programs and services, and coordinated recruitment of the initial Partnership Executive Director. Funds were secured from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (Section 99.7 of the Michigan legislative budget) and other sources to continue operation of the Partnership for the 2013-2014 fiscal year. Network-Partnership collaboration has been designed to create a strong foundation for the Partnership as it continues its efforts to strengthen STEM education for Michigan teachers and students. • Establish partnerships with appropriate stakeholders to advance STEM education in Michigan. Collaboration is a primary strategy of MMSCN to broaden and deepen programs and services to address the STEM education needs of Michigan teachers and students. In 2013-2014 the Network and Centers developed and maintained active partnerships with area businesses, non-profit groups, community organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies. 14 Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report

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Two examples of partnerships include: • More than 60 businesses, community groups, and government agencies partnered with MMSCN and individual Centers on a variety of projects to support STEM education for students and teachers. Examples of how students benefit from these partnerships: access to equipment and facilities, opportunities to conduct research with mentors, job-shadow people in STEM-related careers, participate in STEM competitions, and enroll in mathematics and science camps. Illustrative of business and community partners include Belle Isle Nature Zoo, Dow Chemical, Bronson Hospital, Port Crescent State Park, Harsco Track Technologies, Kellogg Company, Consumers Energy, MSU’s Kellogg Biological Station, and Nestle Waters. • The Network and Centers partnered with individual faculty members, college departments, and grant-funded projects in the 15 state universities, 12 private institutions, and 10 community colleges. These collaborations included developing and facilitating teacher professional learning programs; conducting college courses and seminars for teachers; creating STEM-related classroom materials; and conducting summer institutes and camps for teachers and students. Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network 2013-2014 Annual Report 15

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