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Annual Report 2014

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ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4 SUNY Research DRIVING EXCELLENCE. CREATING OPPORTUNITY.

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CONTENTS WORLD RENOWNED: > Managing the World-famous Brookhaven National Laboratory > Leading the Way to the Next Generation of Power Electronics > Opening a New Universe for Drug Discovery > Laying the Foundation for Our Energy Future > Disrupting the Vicious Cycle of Alcohol Abuse > Building the Nation’s Most Advanced Statewide Weather Network > Preserving Our Cultural Heritage > Research Statistics Page 14 Page 16 Page 17 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Page 12 Table of ECONOMIC IMPACT: > START-UP NY Business Gives New Meaning to “Urban Agriculture” > Students Launch New Ventures in NYS > SUNY Brain Summer Scholars Program > Getting More Undergraduates Involved in Research Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 SUPPORTING THE SYSTEM: > Operational Highlights > Financials Page 34 Page 35 CUTTING-EDGE INNOVATION: > New Drug Delivery Method Targets Cancer Cells > Green Chemical Process Earns Patent for SUNY Oneonta > Molecule Lowers Plasma Cholesterol and Atherosclerosis > BasicBites Contain Breakthrough Technology Developed ® PHOTO CREDITS: Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 > Stony Brook University — Pages 4, 11, 23, 28, 31 > Brookhaven National Laboratory — Page 5 > SUNY Polytechnic Institute — Pages 6, 25, 31, 34 > University at Buffalo — Pages 8, 9, 18, 31 > Binghamton University — Pages 11, 12, 27 > University at Albany — Pages 15, 32 > SUNY Buffalo State — Pages 16, 17 > SUNY Oneonta — Page 20 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 29 > SUNY Downstate Medical Center — Page 21 > SUNY College of Optometry — Page 26 at Stony Brook University > Innovation Statistics POWERING COLLABORATION: > Aphid-like Sensors Track Response to Global Warming > SUNY Team Targets Nearsightedness > Using 3-D Printing Technology to Build Implantable Tissues and Organs > Conference Explores New Opportunities in 3-D Printing > Arts and Humanities (AAH) Update > Teaching, Learning and Assessment (TLA) Update On the Cover: University at Buffalo researchers aim to find the cause and a cure for Parkinson’s disease. (Douglas Levere) ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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SUNY Research At The State University of New York, research is a catalyst for opportunity. Across the SUNY system, undergraduate and graduate students are pursuing careers through research; world-class faculty are producing cutting-edge innovation; campuses are partnering with each other and with local and global businesses to establish strategic alliances; entrepreneurs are obtaining investment in start-up companies; and new jobs are being created. Throughout, SUNY research is at the core, actively driving excellence for the benefit of New York State and the world. In 2014, SUNY research achieved acclaim spanning a wide range of disciplines and dimensions. This report highlights the type and magnitude of research successes Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. happening at SUNY every day. They include designing the nation’s most advanced weather observation system, championing applications for 3-D printing technology, and creating new materials that improve energy storage and power electronic devices. In six designated Networks of Excellence, collaboration at SUNY is leading advancements in areas of research strength. Faculty members in multiple and diverse fields in hard and soft sciences, as well as the arts, are engaged to maximize opportunity. Supporting SUNY research is The Research Foundation for SUNY (RF). As the largest, most comprehensive university-connected research foundation in the country, the RF provides essential services to SUNY faculty, students and staff who conduct life-changing research in medicine and life sciences; engineering and nanotechnology; physical sciences and energy; social sciences; and computer and information sciences. The RF manages SUNY’s research portfolio, protects and leverages its intellectual property, and develops and makes strategic investments in programs designed to drive innovation and job growth. SUNY research is creating opportunity on all fronts. In the lab, and in the field, and with partners both near and far, SUNY research is driving excellence and changing the world.

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WORLD RENOWNED Managing the World-famous Brookhaven National Laboratory Working together as Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), Stony Brook University and Battelle have successfully managed Brookhaven National Laboratory for the past 16 years, overseeing significant scientific achievements in such areas as superconductivity, catalysis, and biofuels; and development of a strong partnership with New York State on science and technology initiatives. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a new five-year, $3.2 billion contract to BSA to manage and operate the world-famous laboratory. The result of a nationwide competition for the management and operations contract for the laboratory, the award follows the submission of a proposal by BSA, which was jointly founded by the Research Foundation on behalf of Stony Brook University with Battelle, a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. “The renewal of this contract demonstrates the DOE’s confidence in our strong scientific leadership as well as our vision for the future of the laboratory that will fulfill the DOE’s expectations for transformational science,” said BSA Board Chair and Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., M.D. DOE’s Office of Science is the largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. In making its selection, DOE acknowledged BSA’s vision for advancing the department’s science mission, the strength of its executive leadership team, and its commitment to bring more than $118 million in external resources to BNL. The new contract began on Jan. 5, 2015, and has a base term of five years, with up to 15 additional years that can be earned through award-term incentives. With extensive core research capabilities and a rich history of scientific breakthroughs that includes seven Nobel Prizes, Brookhaven National Laboratory advances the mission of DOE’s Office of Science through the study of nuclear and particle physics to gain a deeper understanding of matter, energy, space, and time; photon sciences and nanomaterials research to address energy problems of critical importance to the nation; and cross-disciplinary research to understand the relationship between climate change, sustainable energy, and Earth’s ecosystems. The lab’s annual budget of approximately $650 million supports 2,850 full-time employees and the operation of worldleading research. P4 | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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in our strong scientific leadership as well as our vision for the future of the laboratory that will fulfill the DOE’s expectations for transformational science.” “The renewal of this contract demonstrates the DOE’s confidence — Samuel L. Stanley Jr., M.D., BSA Board Chair and Stony Brook University President SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P5

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WORLD RENOWNED Leading the Way to the Next Generation of Power Electronics New York State is partnering with over 100 private companies, led by GE, to launch the New York Power Electronics Manufacturing Consortium. Enabled by the START-UP NY taxfree initiative, the consortium will invest over $500 million, focusing on the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials used in semiconductors. GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt said, “GE is proud to support New York’s Power Electronics Manufacturing Consortium, which places New York at the forefront of the next revolution in power. By partnering, we are bringing breakthrough reliable technology to market faster and at lower cost so our customers and global industries see major productivity gains and operate at peak efficiency.” SUNY Polytechnic Institute President Dr. Alain Kaloyeros said, “Power electronics is one of the fastest-growing global markets, and New York is now poised to lead the way in their continued refinement.” GE will be a lead partner in the fab housed at SUNY Poly’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Albany, which will develop and produce low-cost, high-performance, 6-inch silicon carbide (SiC) wafers. These SiC-based power electronic devices have significant advantages over silicon, including the capacity to handle much higher frequencies and temperatures, which decreases the size and cost for companion filtering and cooling systems. Additionally, the devices can be half the size of similar silicon devices, providing increased power density and reliability. In its current form, SiC technology can be cost prohibitive for smallerto medium-size companies. SEMATECH and IBM will be the lead partners in the Rochester fab, which will research and develop next-generation technology for gallium nitride (GaN) devices. Applications for GaN include climate control and management of high value-infrastructure (such as data centers and manufacturing plants), backup and support of mission critical facilities (hospitals, fire departments, etc.), green energy development, electric vehicles, passenger rail, commercial and military aircraft and ships, and smart power grid design. “This partnership will create thousands of new jobs in — Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor of New York upstate New York, tapping into our highly trained workforce and existing centers of high-tech research and development.” SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P7

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WORLD RENOWNED Opening a New Universe for Drug Discovery The University at Buffalo, representing a national consortium of eight research universities and institutes, has been awarded a prestigious $25 million Science and Technology Center grant from the National Science Foundation to transform the field of structural biology using X-ray lasers. With the grant, UB and its partner institutions will establish The BioXFEL research center. Headquartered in Buffalo, the BioXFEL center will focus on developing new X-ray bioimaging techniques — including an advanced form of X-ray crystallography called serial femtosecond crystallography — to analyze a vast array of new molecular targets for drug discovery. This technique will provide scientists with new insights into how biological molecules function, what might be happening when disease occurs and what compounds might be designed as drugs to modify this activity. “Together with its partners, UB is especially proud to announce this highly competitive award,” said UB President Satish K. Tripathi. “NSF selects just a handful of Science and Technology Center winners every four years from a pool of hundreds of applicants. This research builds on western New York’s rich legacy of expertise in X-ray crystallography, historically based within the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute and UB’s Department of Structural Biology.” P8 | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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While current techniques in crystallography provide almost 90 percent of what scientists know about biomolecular structure, fewer than 20 percent of purified proteins currently form the crystals necessary for this technique. With the new bioimaging technique developed in the BioXFEL center, scientists will be able to analyze crystals 1,000 times smaller than the ones they can use now. A whole new universe of drug targets will become accessible for study as a result. Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute expertise will play a central role in the new center, particularly its National Institutes of Health-funded high-throughput screening laboratory, which has been growing crystals of proteins for hundreds of client labs throughout the U.S. for a decade. Arizona State brings expertise in determining the structures of membrane proteins and viruses, which are difficult to crystallize. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) will provide key theoretical and experimental contributions. Together, UB, Arizona State and UWM will offer education programs to develop young scholars in this technique at the graduate and postdoctoral level, as well as the undergraduate and high school levels. competitive award. NSF selects just a handful of Science and Technology Center winners every four years from a pool of hundreds of applicants.” — Satish K. Tripathi, University at Buffalo President “Together with its partners, UB is especially proud to announce this highly SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P9

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WORLD RENOWNED Laying the Foundation for Our Energy Future SUNY, owner of the fifth-largest university-based clean energy patent portfolio in the United States, was awarded two U.S. Department of Energy grants to fund Energy Frontier Research Centers at Binghamton University and Stony Brook University. Totaling $22.8 million, the grants are among the largest federal awards in university history. “We are mobilizing some of our most talented scientists to join forces and pursue the discoveries and breakthroughs that will lay the foundation for our nation’s energy future,” U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said. The $12.8 million Binghamton University grant was awarded to the NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage, directed by M. Stanley Whittingham, a pioneer in the development of lithium ion batteries. Whittingham and his colleagues want to understand the fundamental chemical reactions in energy storage materials to make them work better and to develop new materials that are cheaper, environmentally friendly and able to store more energy than current materials can. “The research I have been involved with for over 30 years has helped advance how we store and use energy at a very foundational level — through batteries that, among other things, power most laptop computers,” Whittingham said. “This infusion of funding will allow our work to continue as we seek to improve on current methods for energy storage in a way that will impact everyone around the globe.” The $10 million Stony Brook University grant was awarded to renowned energy storage researcher Esther Takeuchi. The Stony Brook-led Center for Mesoscale Transport Properties will conduct basic science research to advance and enable the deliberate design of materials and components to achieve higher performance, longer life, and safer energy storage systems, including batteries. “Responding to the nation’s need for clean, affordable and reliable energy is one of the major challenges of our time,” said Takeuchi. “Electrochemical energy storage plays a significant role in the broader energy landscape. By selecting this program, the DOE has recognized that understanding and controlling internal resistance will enable future implementation of safe, high-power, efficient energy storage solutions.” P10 | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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our most talented scientists to join forces and pursue the discoveries and breakthroughs that will lay the foundation for our nation’s energy future.” — Ernest Moniz, U.S. Energy Secretary SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P11 “We are mobilizing some of

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research on alcohol and alcohol abuse is important, timely and it addresses issues that impact society on a massive scale.” — Harvey Stenger, Binghamton University President “Professor Spear’s P12 | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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WORLD RENOWNED Disrupting the Vicious Cycle of Alcohol Abuse The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $8.2 million grant to The Research Foundation for SUNY in support of the Developmental Exposure Alcohol Research Center, an alcohol research center led by Binghamton University. The grant, which started Sept. 1, is a renewal of a five-year, $8.5 million grant awarded to the center in 2010. It will fund research on the effects of developmental exposure to alcohol, focusing on two times when the developing brain is exposed to alcohol — prenatally, via maternal use of alcohol, and during adolescence, when kids begin using alcohol themselves. At both of these times, the developing brain is sensitive to alteration by alcohol. “What we’re really interested in is what happens with a doublehit,” said Linda Spear, scientific director of the research center and principal investigator of the grant. “We’re worried about this kind of vicious cycle that starts when kids are exposed to alcohol prenatally, making them more likely to use alcohol and initiate use early in adolescence, with that in turn increasing the probability of developing an alcohol use disorder in adulthood. Using a variety of models in basic research, we’re examining consequences of separate and combined exposures at both critical developmental stages and how that contributes to a cycle of disruptive alcohol use over generations.” The center’s goal is to develop strategies for disrupting this cycle — to reduce the probability that kids who are prenatally exposed would be more likely to use alcohol as adolescents, and to prevent and reverse effects induced by adolescent alcohol exposure. “Professor Spear’s research on alcohol and alcohol abuse is important, timely and it addresses issues that impact society on a massive scale,” Binghamton University President Harvey Stenger said. “Receipt of this grant enables Spear and her colleagues at the center to dig even deeper into this important topic and to use this knowledge to develop possible prevention strategies.” A partnership of Binghamton University, Upstate Medical University and other upstate New York institutions, the Developmental Exposure Alcohol Research Center truly meets the spirit of collaborative and multidisciplinary research. Securing renewal of the unique center will enable researchers to move forward with path-breaking studies on how early developmental alcohol exposure impacts long-term alcohol use and abuse for years to come. SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P13

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WORLD RENOWNED Building the Nation’s Most Advanced Statewide Weather Network Studies over the past decade show recent trends toward more extreme precipitation in the northeastern United States, including New York State, suggesting an increasing vulnerability. Over the past three years alone, New York has responded to Hurricanes Irene and Sandy and Tropical Storm Lee by strengthening and improving the state’s resilience to extreme weather events. In his 2015 State of the State address, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced plans to deploy the nation’s most advanced weather observation system. The NYS Mesonet will be hosted by the University at Albany and provide extensive, state-of-theart, 3-D data to emergency personnel and first responders. The $23.6 million initiative is designed to support better planning for extreme and dangerous weather events. Working in partnership with the NYS Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services and the National Weather Service, the University at Albany’s internationally recognized weather and climate science faculty — the largest research group in New York State and one of the largest in the nation — is spearheading the design, development and implementation of the NYS Mesonet. The network will add some 125 interconnected surface weather stations throughout the state to detect weather patterns and phenomena, with as many as 17 supersites equipped with profiler technology to gather above-ground meteorological observations to support more accurate forecasting. This early warning weather detection system will provide state and local government officials access to highresolution, real-time data and predictive models, enabling emergency management decision-makers to better plan for and mitigate extreme weather events. The 125 stations of the NYS Mesonet system will be located less than 25 miles from each other, many on SUNY campuses throughout the state, reporting and capturing highresolution real-time and spatial data every 15 minutes. The station network was designed by the University at Albany’s Visualization and Informatics Lab. The complete system will be implemented in phases over the next three years. P14 | ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 4

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Studies over the past decade show recent trends toward more extreme precipitation in the northeastern United States, including New York State, suggesting an increasing vulnerability. SUNY Research Driving Excellence. Creating Opportunity. | P15

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