GCSE Curriculum Courses Booklet 2015 to 2017

 

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GCSE Curriculum Courses Booklet 2015 to 2017

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GCSE Curriculum Booklet 2015 - 2017

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Introduction Choosing GCSE courses is a very important aspect of a student’s senior school education. Time and care given to ensuring that the right decisions are made now will be of considerable benefit in the future. The curriculum at King’s Ely is designed to allow four GCSE option choices in addition to the compulsory core GCSE subjects. This is a greater number than in many other schools and is a feature which we hope gives students and parents greater flexibility. Career guidance is pivotal insofar as subject choices should not block potential career avenues. The year 9 Personal Development (GCSE options) afternoon is held in the Lent term, closely followed by student-tutor interviews and a parents’ evening. These events provide opportunities to discuss students’ future education in detail. All GCSE courses are for two years. The arrangement of core a n d options in year 10 continues unchanged into year 11, with the GCSE examinations being held in Summer 2017. Examination boards referred to on the following pages are: AQA, Assessment and Qualifications Alliance; OCR, Oxford, Cambridge and RSA Examinations; Edexcel, Edexcel Foundation; CIE, Cambridge International Examinations. In exploring visual elements such as line, tone, colour, form, compositional organisation, structure and scale, students will have the opportunity to: • respond creatively to an idea, theme or subject; • record from direct observation or personal experience; • pursue a design from the idea stage to practical completion; • work independently; • research, analyse and communicate ideas; • combine materials, ideas and techniques in a sympathetic way; • present a personal response, making informed connections with the work of others. The qualification is comprised of two units of work. The first unit requires the development of a portfolio of work and carries 60% of the final mark. The second unit is the set task and is one unit of work worth 40% of the GCSE Art and Design marks. Business Studies (IGCSE Edexcel) (4BS0) The IGCSE course enables students to: • develop an interest in, and enjoyment of, business subjects that will be sustained in later life; • use relevant terminology, concepts and methods effectively and recognise the strengths and limitations of the ideas used; • develop and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills to current issues in a wide range of appropriate international and UK contexts; • use an enquiring, critical approach to distinguish between facts and opinion and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data, to help build arguments and make informed judgements; • appreciate the range of different stakeholder perspectives in relation to business activities; • have an understanding of the dynamics of business activity and the related considerations of ethics and sustainability in business. Compulsory core curriculum: • English, English Literature, Mathematics, Religious Studies, Science (Science plus Additional Science or Option: Physics, Chemistry and Biology); Information and Communications Technology is continued into GCSE through integration with core curriculum subjects; Students must normally select at least one modern foreign language. Students wishing to specialise in modern foreign languages may choose from French, German and Spanish; Personal Development and Physical Education are also in the curriculum. • • • Art and Design (AQA) The course provides the opportunity to explore the practical development of ideas and use of media in a highly stimulating atmosphere. Students will gain an understanding of contexts in art, craft and design and have the chance to participate in a variety of art excursions as well as regular collaborative exhibitions. Students will follow a specialist approach which focuses on Fine Art or Textile Design: Fine Art: Painting, Drawing, Printmaking, Sculpture, Lens-based imagery and other forms of two-dimensional or three-dimensional imagery. Textile Design: Fashion and Costume, Printed and Dyed, Constructed, Stitched and Embellished, Expressive Textiles and Installed Textiles. Overview of content • Business Activity and the Changing Environment – examines the objectives of businesses, the changing environment and the criteria for judging success. The focus is on the importance of having clear business objectives and how the business environment provides opportunities for, and imposes constraints upon, the pursuit of those objectives; Human Resources – looks at people in organisations focusing on their roles, relationships and management in business; Accounting and Finance – explores the use of accounting and financial information as an aid to decision making; Marketing – focuses on identifying and satisfying customer needs in a changing and competitive international environment; Production – examines the way organisations use and manage resources to produce goods and services. • • • •

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Overview of assessment The assessment of this qualification is through a two-hour examination paper, set and marked by Edexcel. • Single tier of entry. • The total number of marks available is 100. D&T Resistant Materials (Edexcel) Resistant Materials Technology qualification enables students to: • actively engage in design and technology; • make decisions, consider sustainability and combine skills with knowledge and understanding in order to design and make quality products; • explore ways in which aesthetic, technical, economic, environmental, ethical and social dimensions interact to shape designing and making; • analyse existing products and produce practical solutions to needs, wants and opportunities, recognising their impact on quality of life; • develop decision-making skills through individual and collaborative working; • understand that designing and making reflect and influence cultures and societies, and that products have an impact on lifestyle. • develop skills of creativity and critical analysis through making links between the principles of good design, existing solutions and technological knowledge. Unit 1: Creative Design and Make Activities (Unit code: 5RM01) In this unit assessment is internally assessed under controlled conditions taking 40 hours: 60% of the overall GCSE qualification. Students must complete a design and make activity selected from a range of tasks. The students will create a portfolio of evidence showing their design and making skills covering investigation, design and development of ideas, planning, making and testing and evaluation. For the Design activity, students will demonstrate their ability to analyse the design brief, research and develop a detailed specification. This will enable initial ideas to be produced, reviewed and developed. Students will develop a range of sketching and designing techniques including 2D, 3D sketching, modelling and computer aided designs of their ideas to enable a detailed final design to be communicated. This activity will be assessed in a 20 hour controlled assessment task. For the making activity, students will demonstrate their making ability and produce a final product and portfolio of evidence. The evidence will include production plan, diary of making, health and safety issues, and an explanation of how the quality of manufacture and outcome has been achieved before the final testing and evaluation is completed. This activity will be assessed in a 20 hour controlled assessment task. Unit 2: Knowledge and Understanding of Resistant Materials Technology (Unit code: 5RM02) Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in design and technology. Students will learn about industrial and commercial practices and the importance of quality checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times. The knowledge and understanding students develop in this unit can be applied easily to Unit 1. This unit is assessed through a 1½ hour examination paper set and marked by the exam board. The examination paper will consist of multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-writing questions. The exam forms 40% of the overall GCSE qualification. Classical Civilisation (OCR) Classical Civilisation is the study of the great cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome that have had such an impact on our world today. Within the Classical World we find the fountainhead of Western literature, drama, architecture, science, history and philosophy. The GCSE course aims to expose students to some of this immense richness. Various topics are explored, always using authentic ancient sources (be they vase paintings, sculpture, texts or archaeology) as a starting point. No previous experience is required to take GCSE Classical Civilisation, and all texts are studied in English. Unit 1 (A351): City Life in the Classical World (25% - examined) What was it like to live in the great cities of Athens or Rome? From family life to temples, from education to dramatic festivals and gladiator shows, students will gain a fascinating insight into the beating heart of these ancient cities. Unit 2 (A352): Epic and Myth (25% - examined) The Classical world has some of the best stories ever. No more so than the story of Odysseus and his adventures on his journey home from Troy. From selected books of the Odyssey we read the story of the Cyclops, Circe’s island, the bag of winds and much more. Unit 3 (A353): Community Life in the Classical World (25% - examined) We explore the extraordinary community life of ancient Sparta. Its harsh education system attracted nineteenth century educationalists; its intolerance of weakness of any kind won it the admiration of Hitler. And yet Sparta allowed its women far more freedom than other Greek states. Our study of this fascinating society culminates in Herodotus’ account of the heroism of the 300 at Thermopylae. Unit 4 (A354): Culture and Society in the Classical World (25% - controlled assessment) This is an essay of 2,000 words completed in school time but which encourages students to do their own research and to use ancient sources to construct their own argument. OCR offers a number of different essay titles. Recently we have chosen to study the Olympic Games and analyse to what extent our modern games are still influenced by the games at Olympia first recorded in 776 BC. Design & Technology (Edexcel/OCR) Two courses in GCSE Design and Technology (D&T) are offered to cater for students with different interests. Each of these courses more than satisfies the requirements of the National Curriculum and the full range of GCSE grades is available.

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Home Economics: (Food and Nutrition) (OCR) The specification requires the candidates to plan and carry out investigations. Candidates produce tasks in which they analyse issues and problems, and identify, gather and record relevant information and evidence. Candidates will also analyse and evaluate evidence, make reasoned judgements and present conclusions. Candidates will develop knowledge and understanding of human needs within a diverse society and relevant technological and scientific developments. This specification focuses on food and nutrition issues in relation to nutrition, diet and health throughout life; factors affecting consumer choice; the nutritional, physical, chemical and sensory properties of foods in storage, preparation and cooking; food hygiene; safety; and techniques and skills used in food storage, preparation and cooking. The specification is made up of three mandatory units: Drama develops people who can: • solve problems; • think on their feet; • be totally reliable; • work in teams; • communicate well. Drama provides all these skills. All theatre productions you have ever seen are good only if those skills are highly developed on and behind the stage. In addition, success in a subject like this can give you plenty of personal satisfaction and a lifelong leisure interest. In the course students will acquire knowledge of different theatrical genres, styles and rehearsal techniques which will aid them in preparing for performance. Students are expected to research, rehearse and perform in various pieces, keeping a written log of the skills involved in order to prepare them for the written examination. Practical pieces may be in the form of a published script which they will have studied, and/or may be devised from a stimulus such as a play, film/TV programme, newspaper article, poem or theme. In addition to acting, students have the option of learning about theatre design and technical support. Unit 1: Drama written paper (40%) – candidates answer questions based on: • live theatre they have seen; • parts they have played during the course; aspects of theatre design and production, e.g. lighting, sound and costume. Unit 2: Practical Work (60%) – candidates choose from a range of options including: • devised, improvised & scripted work; • physical theatre; • set & costume design; • puppets, make-up & masks; • lighting & sound Unit B001: Food and Nutrition Short Tasks Candidates submit three short tasks which form 30% of the total GCSE marks. Two of the tasks will assess planning, practical work and evaluation. The third task will assess investigation skills. All tasks are set by the exam board and allow the students to demonstrate their different practical skills and knowledge. Unit B002: Food Study Candidates submit one task which forms 30% of the total GCSE marks. The food study will assess research, selecting and justifying choices, planning, practical work and evaluation. The task is chosen from a list supplied by the exam board and will allow the students to demonstrate a wide variety of skills. English Language GCSE (AQA) English Language GCSE (compulsory subject); English Literature GCSE (AQA) All students take English Language GCSE; sets 1-4 also take English Literature GCSE; set 5 takes English Language only. The aims of the English course are that students should: • understand facts, ideas and opinions as they pass on information; • be critical of what they read and be able to sort out ideas for particular purposes; • be able to talk about experiences; • know how the English language is constructed; • be able to write well for a variety of tasks and situations; • be able to use spoken English; • use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar • be aware of the differences between formal and informal English; • enjoy reading texts which expresses mind-widening ideas. Unit B003: Principles of Food and Nutrition 1½ hour exam which forms 40% of the total GCSE marks. Candidates are required to answer five compulsory questions, including short answers and free-response formats. The questions will cover all aspects of the following: • • • • • • nutrition and health; food commodities; meal planning; food preparation and cooking; food safety and preservation; consumer education. Drama (AQA) Drama is an important and exciting option but you need to be clear about its intentions. The course is NOT designed to produce actors or stage technicians.

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In Speaking and listening, students have the chance to show how well they can: • put experience into words, expressing what they feel and imagine; • understand, order and present facts, ideas and opinions; • show a sense of audience and awareness of style in a variety of situations; • recognise different levels and kinds of meaning in a variety of contexts; • make a personal response to what is heard, read and understood; • reflect on the way other people communicate. In Reading, students will be able to show that they can: • distinguish between facts, ideas and opinions; • recognise different sorts of meanings; • understand how writers use language to achieve their effects. In Writing, students will have plenty of opportunity to show that they can: • write about personal feelings; • understand and present facts, ideas and opinions; • show they can appreciate good grammar by using it well; • spell correctly and use punctuation with assurance. English for Speakers of Other Languages – ESOL (CIE) The ESOL department delivers a specialised English language programme for non-native speakers who would benefit from improving their English skills. The aim of the course is to develop the four language skills: • Speaking: to communicate ideas and information clearly and confidently using pronunciation and intonation intelligible to a native speaker; to interact in conversational English in a range of contexts; • Listening: to comprehend English spoken with different accents and for different purposes (interviews, arguments, lectures, etc.); to extract gist and meaning from aural information and record in the form of notes; • Reading: to develop a variety of reading techniques (scanning, skimming and detailed reading); to extract facts and main ideas from non-fictional literature; to deduce meaning from and respond to fictional literature; • Writing: to compose a variety of text formats (reports, letters, discursive essays, etc.) for different audiences; to compose clear, accurate notes and summaries. Vocabulary and grammar are developed throughout the programme, with lessons tailored to the students’ individual needs. Individual support is also provided to students who experience language difficulties in specialised subject areas which have a high language content, e.g. Religious Studies, Business Studies. In years 10 and 11, students work towards the IGSCE in English as a Second Language. Assessment English Language is examined through two final written papers taken at the end of year 11. Candidates will be asked to show their understanding of written passages from literary or media sources; they will also be expected to write essays, including creative writing. Speaking and Listening is now assessed separately from the rest of GCSE English Language and is awarded a separate mark. Candidates taking English Language and English Literature will be awarded two grades for the two separate GCSEs. Geography (OCR) The aim of the Geography course is to give students an understanding of the nature of the earth’s surface, the character of places and how human beings interact with their environment. Studies will include enquiries on small, regional, national and international scales. Overall, the course should enable students to make more sense of the world and encourage them to hold informed views on rapidly changing world issues. In the examination, candidates will be expected to: show an awareness of places in relation to others; • explain understanding of environments and the processes which affect them (economic and technological developments); • how understanding of how people interact with their environment; • be aware of communities and cultures both in our society and elsewhere; • demonstrate a range of skills developed through practical work: observing fact-finding and analysis, using books, maps and photographs; • show sensitivity to the environment and an awareness of the contrasts between rich and poor nations. English Literature GCSE (AQA) The course aims to give students a grounding in the treasures of English Literature. There will be opportunities for students to explore their literary interests and to hone the skills necessary for literary study. In particular, students will develop: • the ability to read, understand and respond to a wide range of literary texts, and to appreciate the ways in which authors achieve their effects; • awareness of social, historical and cultural contexts and influences in the study of literature; • the ability to construct and convey meaning in speech and writing. The course is closely linked to the English Language examination and students will study a variety of twentieth and pre-twentieth century Literature, including the writings of Shakespeare and authors from the canon of English Literature (such as Charles Dickens and Jane Austen). Assessment is by two written examinations at the end of year 11.

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The core course content covers four themes: • rivers and coasts; • population and settlement; • natural hazards; • economic development. There is also a Geographical Enquiry that is assessed on one fieldwork task. In addition, there is an assessed Sustainable Decision Making exercise based on the core course content. Unit B561: Sustainable Decision Making (25%) Decision making exercise based on one of the four key themes. Unit B562: Key Geographical Enquiry Controlled Assessment (25%) Fieldwork Focus task (2,000 words). Includes collection of primary data as part of a fieldtrip in the Michaelmas Term of year 11. Unit B563: Key Geographical Themes (50%) The exam consists of questions on the four main themes. This paper requires learners to demonstrate their ability to apply their geographical knowledge and understanding to a range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts. The topics which will be studied are: Year 10 1 Source Enquiry: War and the Transformation of British Society c.1903-28 (25%) 2 Depth Study: Germany 1918-1939 (25%) Year 11 3 Outline Study: The Cold War 1943-1991 (25%) 4 Representations of History: Vietnam 1950-1975 (Controlled Assessment 25%) Information and Communications Technology (London Learning) City and Guilds Online ITQ level 2 Award. ICT is a fundamental part of our lives. The growth in the use of mobile phones, portable computers and the internet is affecting the way we all live and work. The aim of this unit is to enable students to apply the skills they developed in presenting and handling information (Unit 1) in year 9 and to use appropriate software applications effectively in a range of curriculum subject contexts. The coursework unit this year (Unit 2) promotes independent learning and encourages students to be discriminating in the evidence they assemble for assessment. The unit is delivered through the compilation of a portfolio of evidence for the application of ICT in naturally occurring learning situations. It helps students prepare for life as independent adults and enhances employment opportunities. In Year 9 students experienced programming in the Summer Term. Opportunities for programming exist with the Coding Club in Year 10. The course also provides an essential foundation for any further courses including those specific to the use of computers and new technology. History (Edexcel) The History course will bring the past alive. During the course students will explore cause and consequence, continuity and change, similarity and difference in a number of historical periods. The development of particular skills will be important: how to find out information from first-hand sources and from other people’s writings; how to present what has been discovered in a logical way. This is an opportunity to develop an interest in history which will continue into adult life. In the examination, candidates will be expected to: • recall and select knowledge, setting it out clearly; • show that they understand something of the pattern of historical development; • prove they can explore history using a variety of sources – books, statistics and documentaries; • interpret findings, sorting out fact from opinion; • reach balanced conclusions. The GCSE comprises of 4 modules and includes: • questions which will ask candidates to respond to a variety of forms of historical evidence; • short-answer questions to test knowledge and understanding; • questions which require candidates to write continuous prose, but not necessarily long essays; • controlled assessment task: marked by teachers and moderated by the exam board. Summary of learning outcomes To achieve Unit 2 a candidate must: • demonstrate software skills in a range of subjects or contexts; • present information that is fit for purpose in a range of subjects or contexts; • apply appropriate graphics and images from a range of sources; • use ICT tools to draft, bring together and refine information and data; • manage an electronic portfolio of evidence. Method of assessment Assessment is by outcome in Unit 1. These are internally assessed units that were examined in year 9. Unit 2 is achieved by the completion of an electronic portfolio of evidence, according to the unit assessment criteria. In order to achieve the unit, the evidence that the candidate presents for assessment needs to demonstrate that all of the learning outcomes for the unit are met.

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The candidate must: • produce six pieces of evidence from subjects in the curriculum or different contexts where ICT is used correctly; • identify IT skills applied in coursework evidence and reflect on why they were used. Learning Support The Learning Support department caters for students of all ages with varying degrees of difficulty in language-based subjects and in Mathematics and also provides support across the curriculum. The Learning Support programme is flexible and is dependent on the number of students needing supportive help and the degree of difficulty they are experiencing. Students are taught in a small group situation with an individualised programme to suit their own needs. The support programme in year 10 allows for structured support in basic literacy and study skills including organisation, revision and exam skills. This leads to a more flexible programme in year 11. Less emphasis is placed on skills and students are given more responsibility for their own learning. In the Lent and Summer Terms in year 11, time is given to revision. The areas of study are student-generated and depend on individual need. The Learning Support option is therefore ideal not only for the dyslexic student, but also for the student who struggles, moves at a slower pace than others, or who needs that extra bit of help. This helps to ensure success in slightly fewer subjects for those students who need support. Latin (OCR) Why study Latin? Highly regarded by universities and employers for the analytical skills it imparts, students of Latin enjoy the linguistic rigour of the subject and the great literature it opens up to them. Students need to have studied Latin in year 9 before embarking on the GCSE course. We will experience at first hand elements of the culture, language and social and political life of the Roman civilisation which has inspired many later generations. Students will learn: • how to develop a sensitive and analytical approach to language generally, including an awareness of the relationship between Latin and the languages of today; • how better to understand their own and others’ cultures; • how to read texts by great authors such as Virgil, Ovid, Caesar and Tacitus in Latin; • much of the richness of the Classical World through the study of Classical Art and Sculpture and trips; • how to communicate clearly and effectively. Unit 1 (A401): Latin Language 1 (examined) 25% Unit 2 (A402): Latin Language 2 (examined) 25 % Both language papers test linguistic understanding through unseen translation and comprehension. Unit 3 (A403): Latin Prose Literature (examined) 25% Unit 4 (A404): Latin Verse Literature (examined) 25% Both literature papers are designed to elicit the student’s literary appreciation of the texts of the prescribed authors. Mathematics (OCR) The main aims of the course as a whole are to: • use and apply mathematics in everyday situations; • solve problems that will test conceptual understanding; • encounter, consider and discuss alternative lines of argument. The content is divided between: • Number; • Algebra; • Ratio, Proportion and Rates of Change; • Geometry; • Probability and Statistics. Within each topic area the skills required are: • use calculators and computers efficiently; • develop flexibility in computational methods; • express relationships in real-life situations; • model real situations algebraically; • explore the geometry of graphic images; • undertake purposeful enquiries based on the analysis of data; • explore the principles that govern random events. The assessment is via three papers. Each lasts one and half hours. Two papers allow the use of a calculator. The other is a non- calculator paper. This new specification does not allow a formula sheet in the examinations. There is a new grading scale that uses the number 1-9 to identify levels of performance (with 9 being the top level). The new Mathematics GCSE will be double weighted in secondary school performance measures from 2016. Classical Greek (OCR) If you enjoy and are good at Latin then you will probably also enjoy Greek. You will progress from grappling with a strange alphabet to mastering a whole new range of words (and in the process understand what a lot of technical English terms literally mean); and eventually to appreciating some of the most sublime literature ever penned, in the original Greek. Greek is offered off timetable from half way through year 9 and can then be pursued as far as students wish. If you have the drive and commitment you can take the GCSE. It follows exactly the same format as Latin GCSE, though obviously with Greek language and texts. We normally study stories from Herodotus (The ‘Father of History’) and a portion of one of the epics of Homer, the first extant poet in the Western World, and the greatest.

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Modern Foreign Languages: French/German/Spanish (AQA) The GCSE courses are designed so that students are encouraged to evaluate foreign languages in terms of their practical uses within a wholly contemporary framework. The broad aims of the courses are to: • develop the ability to use languages effectively for purposes of practical communication; • form a sound base of the skills and attitudes required for further study, work and leisure; • offer insights into the culture and civilisation of other countries; • develop an awareness of the nature of language and language learning; • provide enjoyment and intellectual stimulation; • encourage positive attitudes to foreign language learning and to speakers of foreign languages. The emphasis on topics in the GCSE syllabus means that students have the opportunity to prepare more thoroughly within a limited range of clearly defined topic areas such as Media, Hobbies, Health, Shopping, etc. Students are therefore given credit for what they achieve rather than being penalised for lack of specific knowledge i n a certain area. The GCSE examination is divided into four main skill areas: • Listening 20% • Reading 20% • Writing 30% • Speaking 30% The successful candidate should therefore be capable of understanding native speakers, asking and responding to questions, understanding formal yet authentic written material and writing informally (e.g. letters, relating personal experiences, reporting recent events, etc.). In years 10 and 11, there is the option to study two modern languages to GCSE. Those students who do not intend to proceed further will have acquired new insights into one or more major European languages and cultures. Those who wish to continue their languages to A Level and beyond will find the GCSE courses suitable preparation for the revised A Level specifications. German This is a lively and inspiring course that will equip students with practical language skills through the use of varied and enjoyable activities. As well as learning to communicate in German in a wide variety of everyday situations, they are steered toward high achievement in the GCSE examination. Interest and motivation i s ensured through the use of a range of authentic and up to date media and material to which young people can relate. In addition to regular exposure to feature films, satellite TV and various reading material from German speaking countries, the use of ICT is strongly emphasised. With regular lessons in the IT suite, all students have easy access to engaging materials on the school intranet including interactive exercises in order to practise, revise and enhance their skills in the language. The school enjoys close links with the Liebfrauenschule Mühlhausen Gymnasium in Ely’s twin town of Kempen in Germany, which provides opportunities for regular visits, exchanges and contact with pen friends. Spanish This course is taught in a new and exciting way. Traditional classroom instruction is combined with the latest technologies to motivate and facilitate learning. The text books used are supplemented by a wealth of DVDs, worksheets, interactive activities and computer games created especially for the students. Some of the lessons will also be delivered in the new state of the art Language Laboratory, where students will have the opportunity to practise listening and oral skills in an innovative and challenging way. During year 10, a school exchange is organized with our partner school IES Benjamín de Tudela in Northern Spain. This will allow students to enhance their confidence and oral skills. Similarly, a wide range of joint activities between both schools will also take place during year 10.The combination of all these different activities will lead to a smooth transition to AS level study while acquiring a deep understanding of both Spanish language and culture. Music (Edexcel) Why music? King’s is full of great musicians already, and our outstanding GCSE results confirm the ability all around us. This course is about performing, composing, and listening, and can make you better at each. The first thing you should know is that 40% of the course is performing. Performing — you make two recordings on your main instrument, performing both as a soloist and as a member of an ensemble. But it is more than this. GCSE music can help you to hear and understand more. And the more you hear, the better you can listen, the more enjoyment you will find in music. Listening — there are twelve key works, each of which you study in detail. You will meet composers from Mozart to Moby, Miles Davis and Jeff Buckley, as well as Indian and African musicians. You compose, too. Most styles are welcome, the limits those of your imagination. You will be helped with your ideas, to use the Composing — you learn techniques, forms, and technologies, and use them to produce two short compositions. French This is a modern and dynamic course with a strong emphasis on the use of French in the classroom. Materials are up to date, and intended to appeal to young people’s interests. Students will be exposed to a variety of language through a range of resources. A thorough grounding in grammar is also assured and students have regular slots in the Language Laboratory to practise topic work and interactive grammar exercises. Lessons are lively and conducted as far as possible in French and students have ample opportunity to increase their confidence through role play, pair work and debates. Authentic reading material is used wherever possible. The course proves successful in preparing students for top-grade performance at GCSE, and smooth transition to AS level study for the able linguist.

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Each element of the course links with the next: you will be a better performer as a result of your listening; you will compose with more understanding because you perform. • • consider religious and non-religious responses to moral issues; identify, investigate and respond to fundamental questions of life raised by human experience. Physical Education (OCR) The OCR GCSE in Physical Education is an ideal option for the practically able student as 60% of the overall mark is awarded for practical performance in four activities. The course is an ideal foundation for students who wish to undertake Physical Education at A level, or those who aim to pursue a career in the leisure industry. The aims of the course are: • to encourage candidates to improve their planning, performance and analysis of selected physical activities; • to encourage candidates to improve in knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant physical activities; • to enable candidates to know and understand both why people participate in games and the factors that affect performance. Approximately 60% of course time will be given to practical work and 40% of course time will be spent in the classroom. These percentages are a reflection of the weighting given to practical and theory work in the final grade. The examination consists of assessment of four activities, from within a specified list. Assessment objectives In the examination candidates must demonstrate their ability to: • recall, select, organize and display knowledge of the syllabus content; • describe, analyse and explain the relevance and application of the differing ideas, beliefs and themes; • evaluate different responses to religious and moral issues. Examination There are two written examination papers at the end of year 11. Sciences (AQA Certificates IGCSE) Biology, Chemistry and Physics As of 2011 we have offered the AQA Certificates (also referred to as IGCSEs). They are linear qualifications and all the written examination papers are sat at the end of year 11. Each AQA Certificate is equivalent to a GCSE full course, but there is no Controlled Assessment. Candidates’ understanding of scientific investigations and practical work is instead assessed through the written papers in year 11.There is scope to cover more topics, and this in turn allows for development of analytical and evaluative skills as well as allowing more factually based learning. For these reasons the Certificates are a better general background science education, as well as also being better preparation for the Science A Levels. We are flexible in our approach to teaching Sciences at King’s, so there is the choice in year 10 either to continue to take Biology, Chemistry and Physics as three separate Certificates or to study all three sciences in less breadth and take the Double Award Science Certificate (equivalent to two GCSEs). All of the sciences are taught by a subject specialist. This provides each pupil with a balanced science curriculum in which all three sciences are studied and the separate subject areas remain clear. Religious Studies (RS) (Edexcel) “The unexamined life is not worth living” – Socrates. Religious Studies offers students the opportunity to consider and reflect upon those existential questions concerning the purpose and meaning of life. The course consists of preparation for two examination papers. One of the papers consists of ethical and philosophical issues, such as relationships, marriage and divorce, sexuality, contraception, abortion, euthanasia, prejudice and discrimination, atheism and agnosticism, evil and suffering. In the other paper, students study a range of further ethical issues, considering these from the standpoints of Christianity, Islam or Judaism and a non-religious view. The issues covered include Rights, Genetic Engineering and Cloning, Environmental Ethics, War and Pacifism and Crime and Punishment. Religious Studies significantly contributes to the National Curriculum cross- curricular themes of Citizenship and Personal Social Education. The main aim of the course is to give students opportunity to: • acquire and develop knowledge and understanding of the beliefs, values and traditions of two religions and a non- religious tradition (Humanism); • consider the influence of beliefs, values and traditions on personal, local and international levels; Which course? Both pathways provide a solid background to A Level studies in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Pupils wishing to take the Triple Award must indicate their preference by choosing Biology + Chemistry + Physics from the option blocks available at option choice time. Because of its increased depth and breadth of content, the Triple Award ideally suits those pupils intending to take one or more A levels in a Science subject in the Sixth Form. All other pupils will take the course leading to awards in Double Award Science Certificate. The year 9 Biology, Chemistry and Physics courses provide a common grounding for those taking either of the options outlined above. All pupils entering year 10 will be starting the second year of their threeyear science course.

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Double Award Science Certificate (equivalent to two GCSEs) There are six examination papers, two each in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Each paper is one hour long, with structured and open questions, and is worth 60 marks or 16.67% of the total Double Award Certificate. Double Award Biology topics are as follows: • Cell activity; • Tissues, organs and organ systems; • Carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes; • Human biology; • Defending ourselves against infectious disease; • Plants as organisms; • Variation and inheritance; • Adaptation and interdependence; • Energy and biomass in food chains; • Decay and the carbon cycle. Chemistry topics include: • The periodic table, bonding and structure; • Air and water; • Acids, bases, salts and metals; • Rates of reaction; • Crude oil and fuels; • Alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters; • The production of ammonia, electrolysis and analysis. Physics topics include: • Heating processes; • Energy and efficiency; • Waves; • Forces and their effects; • Electricity; • Nuclear physics. Biology The Certificate in Biology, in addition to the Double Award Topics above, offers students the opportunity to gain a much deeper understanding of: • Blood circulation and ABO blood grouping; • Brain and functional areas; • Eutrophication; • Parasites e.g. fleas, tapeworm, malaria; • Detail of plant sexual reproduction. Assessment Overview Paper 1 Paper 2 1 hr 30 mins 1 hr 30 mins 50% 50% Chemistry The Certificate in Chemistry, in addition to the Double Award topics above, offers students the opportunity to gain a much deeper understanding of: • States of matter; • Reaction with oxygen of a wider range of elements; • Energy changes. Assessment Overview Paper 1 Paper 2 1 hr 30 mins 1 hr 30 mins 50% 50% Physics The Certificate in Physics, in addition to the Double Award topics above, offers students the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of: • Rotational effects of forces (moments); • Centres of mass; • Circular motion; • Hydraulics; • Centres of mass; • Refraction and total internal reflection; • Electromagnetism: the motor and generator effects and transformers Assessment Overview: Unit B1 Unit C1 Unit P1 Unit B2 Unit C2 Unit P2 1 hr 1 hr 1 hr 1 hr 1 hr 1 hr 16.67% 16.67% 16.67% 16.67% 16.67% 16.67% Biology + Chemistry + Physics The specifications used are the AQA Certificates in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics (IGCSEs). For the Biology, Chemistry and Physics Certificates there will be two written papers, each worth 50% and each lasting 1½ hours. Assessment Overview Paper 1 Paper 2 1 hr 30 mins 1 hr 30 mins 50% 50%

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