Civil Rights in the English Speaking World

 

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A project for ESL

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Civil Rights in the English Speaking World Foxe's Book of Martyrs Plate VI - Bradford Appeasing the Riot at St. Paul's Cross by Joseph Martin Kronheim (1810-1896) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 1

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Civil Rights In the English Speaking World Content Outline part 1 part 2 part 3 p. 3 p. 3 p. 3 Lesson plan - for students and teacher Lesson 1 p. 4 Lesson 2 p. 6 Lesson 3 p. 8 Lesson 4 p. 9 Writing Instructions Making an oral presentation p. 10 General Writing outline p. 11 References p. 12 List of Links Image in public Domain Artist unknown. Fetched from https:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: 1890sc_Artwork_07.jpg p. 13 List of assignments (homework) See outline and lesson plan for details Homework 1 Topic & sources Homework 2 References Homework 3 Oral Report (speech) Homework 4 Written report (text) by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 2

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Outline
 Part 1. Pick one area related to civil rights in the English Speaking World… • Black civil rights, • women’s lib, • gay civil right, • civil rights of war veterans, • civil rights of indigenous populations and ethnic groups, • civil rights of religious groups ... Today or in the past. Part 2. Research your topic. Include… • background and information. (Sources needed) • compare with your own country, but this does not have to be extensive. (Sources needed) • your own thoughts on the issue. Part 3.Witten and Oral Presentations. You can choose to make a live presentation in class or you make a recorded digital presentation which you then show in class. You should also turn in a text on your topic. Before you make your presentation you should hand a list of sources. Time frame: You have 2 weeks to prepare and compete this project. Presentations at the end of the 2nd week. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 3

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Please note! The lesson plan is constructed for lessons which are 90-120 mintes long. For shorter lessons the planned content needs to be spread out over two or more lessons. Lesson plan for students & teacher Lesson 1 - Civil Rights I. Introduction to the work unit: written instructions are given out, explanations: requirements and time frame etc (see Outline above). II. Martin Luther King Jr. is a logical starting point for the project Civil Rights - in the English Speaking World. The teachers gives an introduction to the Black Civil Rights Movement in the USA. A. Presentation Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote. Also available at http:// www.youblisher.com/p/1211842-Martin-Luther-King-Jr-The-Civil-RightsMovement/ B. On National Geographic’s web page you can find background and vocabulary useful for studying the issue. C. A timeline is also useful, D. and Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous speech is easier to follow if you can also read the text as you listen. E. For those who want to know more – The King Center is a good place to start. F. National Geographic also has more material for those who want to focus on other areas of civil rights (click below). III. Watch TEDTalk, Yoruba Richen: What the gay rights movement learned from the civil rights movement http://www.ted.com/talks/ yoruba_richen_what_the_gay_rights_movement_learned_from_the_civil_ri ghts_movement For those who want to read as well as listen there is a transcript of the whole speech http://www.ted.com/talks/ yoruba_richen_what_the_gay_rights_movement_learned_from_the_civil _rights_movement/transcript?language=en You can also read the TEDBlog, What the LGBT movement learned from civil rights: Yoruba Richen at TED2014 http://blog.ted.com/what-the-lgbtmovement-learned-from-civil-rights-yoruba-richen-at-ted2014/ IV. After watching the film, together in class discuss Civil right in the USA and compare to the situation in your own country. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 4

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V. Introduce other areas of civil rights in the English speaking world. A. Australia - for example The Stolen Children / and other indigenous populations B. Women’s lib C. War veterans D. Religious groups E. … and suggestions from the students VI. Students start looking for information and to decide their topic. A. A document with a list of sources should be set up; • See below for how to write your list of references. • Use the Harvard generator http://www.harvardgenerator.com/ B. This first list are possible sources to work with such as: text, film, audio… (links), books, etc. This list you should then continue to work with as you research your project. Homework for next lesson: Homework 1: As preparation for next lesson - choose one area of civil rights and start looking for information. Your choice should be set before next lesson. Turn in your chosen topic to your teacher and your list of sources so far. Name your document Civil Rights_references_class_your name. (Also see instructions Outline for students above) by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 5

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Lesson 2 - Civil Rights I. The teacher starts the lesson with asking students about their work so far. II. The teacher introduces a short background to slavery in the USA A. Watch Origins of Slavery in America http://www.history.com/topics/ black-history/slavery/videos/origins-of-slavery B. Students then read the text that supplements the film (same link as above. C. More information can be found at http://spartacus-educational.com/ USAslavery.htm III. The teacher the introduces a short background to Australia’s Stolen Generations. ”The term “Stolen Generations” is used for Aboriginal people forcefully taken away (stolen) from their families between the 1890s and 1970s, many to never to see their parents, siblings or relatives again. Because the period covers many decades we speak of “generations” (plural) rather than “generation” A. A guide to Australia’s Stolen Generations http:// www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/politics/a-guide-to-australiasstolen-generations#axzz3l8JuREVm B. Also watch (if possible) a short extract from the motion picture Austrialia, where the boy Nullah is taken. IV. Continue with a group activity. ”Group activity (in class) - In groups of 3-5 students discuss and compare the different Issues of slavery in America and The Stolen Children in Australia. Hand in: Either take notes or make a recording of your discussion and hand in before the end of the lesson. V. Students continue their work with researching their chosen topic. Save the search results and add these to the document ’list of sources’ already set up. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 6

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VI.The teacher shows students how to use the HarvardGenerator http://www.harvardgenerator.com/ for referencing web sources. Just cut and paste your url (the text in you search window) and you will get a proper reference, which you then cut and paste into your reference list. A. An example: The film Australia (below) with the link http:// www.imdb.com/title/tt0455824/ Should looks like this…. Australia (2008) - IMDb. 2015. Australia (2008) - IMDb. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0455824/. [Accessed 08 September 2015]. … in your list of sources Homework for next lesson: Homework 2: Hand in a document with your list of sources in proper format using the HarvardGenerator http://www.harvardgenerator.com/ for referencing. Name your document Civil Rights_references_class_your name. Extra: The motion picture Australia (with Nichole Kidman and Hugh Jackman) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0455824/ can be watched with this project and the situation of the child Nullah discussed and analysed as an example of one ’stolen child’. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 7

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Lesson 3 - Civil Rights I. The teacher starts the lesson with ”how to make a speech” II. How to Do a Presentation in Class http://www.wikihow.com/Do-aPresentation-in-Class have tips and help along the way III.Students start preparing their speech. Use the General Writing Outline (p.) (See instructions above) Homework for next lesson: Homework 3: Finish your presentations so that you can present next lesson. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 8

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Lesson 4 - Civil Rights I. Student presentations II. After all presentations are done, the teacher gives individual feedback on the presentations. While this is going on students also work with general language proficiency (grammar, vocabulary etc.), using workbooks or online exercises. A. Grammar: https://internetochallt.wordpress.com/lankar/engelska/english/ grammar/ B. Exercises & Recourses: https://internetochallt.wordpress.com/lankar/ engelska/english/exercises-resources/ Homework for next lesson: Homework 4: You should also report your work in the form of text. This essay should cover the same topic and using the same references as your oral presentation. For structuring you text use the General Writing Outline (p. 10, below). by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 9

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General Writing Outline Good planning always lies behind a well-written text. - Welcome any ideas on the topic at hand. - Write them down as they appear. ( Brainstorming ). - Read them through. Which are relevant? Who is the receiver of the text? What is the object of the text? Should it amuse, inform, argue? Erase what is unsuitable. - Decide in which order the relevant ideas are to be used. - How to best start and conclude the text? - Write a draft first, then read it, revise it and make a fair copy. Introduction: The 1st paragraph. Here you catch the reader’s interest, and explain the topic of the text. One way of beginning is to make a bold and controversial statement or with an open question. Main Part: usually of 2-4 paragraphs long. Be explicit and easy to follow. Deal with one thing at a time. Use links between your thoughts and arguments. This makes the text easier to read. Conclusion: The final paragraph. Here you put together the message of your text. Be explicit and clear to make the reader remember your text and its message. Strive to connect the introduction with the conclusion. If the text started with an unanswered question, give the answer in the conclusion. Useful linking expressions: to begin with, secondly, furthermore, in addition, on the other hand, however, contrary to, in spite of, although, even though,finally, in conclusion. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 10

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Making an Oral Presentation When making an oral presentation in class, you must know your subject well and convince your audience that they have something to gain from listening to you. Here are some things you can do to make an effective oral presentation. • • • • Be prepared. Know your audience. Be positive. Don't read your presentation. Talk to your audience. Use your notes as prompts as needed. Provide examples. Use visual aids. Visual aids are supplements to what you say, not replacements for what you say. Maintain eye contact. Shift your eye contact around the room so that everyone feels that you are talking to them. Use your voice effectively. Vary the tone of your voice. Be positive and careful not to talk too quickly. End on a high note. Leave your audience feeling upbeat about what they have just heard. • • • • • 
 by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 11

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INSTRUCTIONS for REFERENCES List of sources Use the Harvard generator http://www.harvardgenerator.com/ for your sources. This will give you links and other sources in correct format after the Harvard referencing system. An example: Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights | Internet och allt. 2015. Martin Luther King Jr. and Civil Rights | Internet och allt. [ONLINE] Available at: https://internetochallt.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ martin-luther-king-jr-and-civil-rights/. [Accessed 25 September 2015]. Note! There are different systems for referencing. Harvard referencing however is one such system widely used. by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 12

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List of Links - Civil Rights Australia: Australia http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0455824/ A guide to Australia’s Stolen Generations http://www.creativespirits.info/ aboriginalculture/politics/a-guide-to-australias-stolen-generations#axzz3l8JuREVm Black Civil Rights: Presentation Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote.http://www.youblisher.com/p/1211842Martin-Luther-King-Jr-The-Civil-Rights-Movement/ National Geographic’s web page you can find background and vocabulary Martins Luther King Jr. timeline Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous speech (voice) and text The King Center Origins of Slavery in America http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery/ videos/origins-of-slavery http://spartacus-educational.com/USAslavery.htm More Civil Rights: National Geographic TEDTalk, Yoruba Richen: What the gay rights movement learned from the civil rights movement http://www.ted.com/talks/ yoruba_richen_what_the_gay_rights_movement_learned_from_the_civil_rights_move ment transcript of the whole speech http://www.ted.com/talks/ yoruba_richen_what_the_gay_rights_movement_learned_from_the_civil_rights_move ment/transcript?language=en TEDBlog, What the LGBT movement learned from civil rights: Yoruba Richen at TED2014 http://blog.ted.com/what-the-lgbt-movement-learned-from-civil-rightsyoruba-richen-at-ted2014/ by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 13

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Presentations: How to Do a Presentation in Class http://www.wikihow.com/Do-a-Presentation-inClass How to reference: the Harvard generator http://www.harvardgenerator.com/ Other resources: Exercises & Recourses: https://internetochallt.wordpress.com/lankar/engelska/ english/exercises-resources/ Grammar: https://internetochallt.wordpress.com/lankar/engelska/english/grammar/ by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 14

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Image in Public Domain The End of the work unit Civil Rights in the English Speaking World This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercialNoDerivatives 4.0 International License by Henrika Florén ENGENG06 15

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