Sixth Form Courses 2015 to 2016

 

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Sixth Form Courses 2015 to 2016

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Sixth Form Courses for entry in 2015

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Introduction This booklet outlines the content of courses offered by the school at Sixth Form level from September 2015. As you are aware A Levels are currently undergoing a phased process of reform. The following courses retain their current AS/A2 structure with 50 % of the course content being examined in the AS exams towards the end of Year 12. Maths Further Maths Geography Classical Civilisation Government and Politics German French Drama Spanish Design and Technology Latin Film Studies Music Physical Education Music Technology Philosophy of Religion and Ethics We are looking very carefully at the structure and content of the courses in the ‘reformed’ subjects. The new A Level courses are designed as a 2 year linear course, however some courses are suited to taking an AS Level towards the end of Year 12. The AS Level does not count towards the A Level but will form a standalone qualification. For some pupils this will act as a useful benchmark of their progress towards the full A Level, whilst for others this maybe the point where they decide not to study this subject any further. Biology Economics Business Studies Physics Chemistry Psychology For the following subjects a 2 year linear course is the most effective way of delivering the course. As such pupils taking the following courses will take their A Level exams at the end of Year 13. English Literature Art and Design History Computing Our priority is to ensure that our pupils are taught courses in the most effective manner so that they can attain the best possible grades to ensure their progression to universities of their choice. The combination of subjects taken by students is very important and staff are available to advise on subject choices. Most students at King’s will study four subjects in Year 12. We are also offering the Extended Project Qualification which can be taken alongside the A level programme. A Level courses are normally taught for 6 lessons of 50 minutes duration. All the courses assume students will also do substantial amounts of work in their own time – as a guide, four to six hours per subject – and that they will organise themselves so that it all gets done. Academic life in King’s Sixth Form is challenging but very rewarding. There might even be some time left for a social life! Examination boards referred to in the following pages are: AQA: Assessment and Qualifications Alliance; OCR: Oxford, Cambridge and RSA Examinations; Edexcel: Edexcel Foundation; WJEC: Welsh Joint Education Committee. * As these new A Levels are currently being developed by Awarding Bodies more details about these courses will be available over the coming months. courses will be available over the coming months.

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Art and Design (AQA) Candidates will be introduced to a variety of experiences employing a range of media, processes and techniques appropriate to the chosen option. Knowledge of Art, Craft and Design will be developed through research, working from first hand experience and secondary, resource material. Practical and analytical skills will also be developed. Candidates are required to participate actively in the course of study, recognising and developing their own strengths in the subject and identifying and sustaining their own lines of enquiry. Candidates can choose to study one or more A-level options in the following specialist areas: 1.  Art and Design – (Fine Art) Practical and contextual/critical work associated with drawing, painting, sculpture, installation, printmaking, moving image and photography. 2.  Art and Design – (Textiles) Practical and contextual/critical work associated with fashion design, costume design, digital textiles, printed, constructed and installed textiles. 3.  Art and Design – (Photography) Practical and contextual/critical work associated with digital techniques alongside traditional methods of work including portraiture, landscape and still life photography, fashion and experimental imagery. Prerequisite: Minimum Grade B in GCSE Art and Design. Course: A-level Title of Module Unit 1 Unit 2 Method of Assessment Coursework (Personal investigation 1000 – 3000 words). Externally set assignment. % of Marks 60 40 Biology (OCR) Biology A-level gives access to the large range of Biology and Biology-related university courses as well as providing an essential qualification for most Medicine and Veterinary Science courses. Biology also provides a worthwhile academic qualification for students who have an interest in the subject but who do not intend to take the subject beyond AS or A2 level. The new Biology A (OCR) course is content-led. It provides a flexible approach for us to provide the most relevant, exciting and up-to-date contexts in which you can learn Biology. Biology A (OCR) is divided into 6 Modules: Module 1 2 3 4 5 6 Title Development of Practical Skills – Planning, Implementation, Analysis and Evaluation Foundations in Biology – Cell structure; Biological molecules; Nucleotides, DNA and RNA; Biological membranes; Cell division Exchange and Transport – Exchange surfaces; Transport in Animals; Transport in Plants Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease Communications, Homeostasis and Energy – Excretion; Neuronal and Hormonal Communication; Photosynthesis and Respiration Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems – Cellular Control; Inheritance; Manipulating Genomes; Biotechnology; Ecosystems; Populations and Sustainability A2 course is made up of Modules 1-6, combined with the Practical Endorsement. Structure of the course Linear assessment, with all exams at the end of the course. Exams and practical work 10% of the total A-level marks require the use of Level 2 (Higher tier GCSE) mathematical skills. This has implications for the entry requirements to the course. There will be no internal assessment that leads to marks that contribute towards the AS or A-level grades. Practical work will be assessed in the written papers. We have excellent equipment at King’s Ely in the department for carrying out the required practical work and at the end of Y12 we have a field trip to the Norfolk North Coast in order to develop key sampling for Module 6. This course gives the appropriate foundation for further study of Art and Design or related subjects in higher education.

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Biology continued A-level BIOLOGY Component 01 CONTENT Assesses content of Modules 1,2,3 and 5 Written exam: 2 hours 15 mins 100 marks 37% of A-level Split into 2 sections: Section A – 15 marks: multiple choice questions Section B – 85 marks a mixture of short and extended response questions Component 02 Assesses content of Modules 1,2,4 and 6 Written exam: 2 hours 15 mins 100 marks 37% of A-level Split into 2 sections: Section A – 15 marks: multiple choice questions Section B – 85 marks a mixture of short and extended response questions Component 03 Assesses content of all modules Written exam: 1 hour 30 mins 70 marks 26% of A-level Component 04 Practical Endorsement in Biology Non-exam assessment Business Studies continued A-level assessment The A-level is assessed by three two hour written exams at the end of the course. Paper 1: Multiple-choice questions, short answer and two essays. Paper 2: Three compulsory data response questions. Paper 3: One compulsory case study consisting of six questions. Testing quantitative skills A-level assesses quantitative skills, making up a minimum of 10% of the overall marks. The skills tested include ratios, averages, fractions, percentages and calculation of profit and loss. ASSESSMENT 70 marks: Question styles include short AND extended response questions QUESTIONS Learners complete a minimum of 12 assessed practicals Pass/Fail awarded by teacher Chemistry (AQA) This Chemistry course, from AQA, is a stepping stone to future study. There has been much consultation with universities, to ensure this course allows students to develop the skills that the universities want to see alongside the academic richness and rigour of Chemistry. The course has the minimum of context so the department will be able to insure students, nurture their passion for Chemistry and lay the groundwork for further study in courses such as Chemistry, Medicine, Biological Sciences and Pharmacy. The government has driven through changes to the A-level courses and AQA has responded to this imposition with a course that is well structured and supported. So the Sixth form experience will be seen as an opportunity by both pupils and teachers. There will be more time to develop the Chemist as well as the exam candidate. Structure of the course Linear assessment, with all exams at the end of the course. Exams and practical work 20% of the total A-level marks require the use of Level 2 (Higher tier GCSE) mathematical skills. This has implications for the entry requirements to the course. There will be no internal assessment that leads to marks that contribute towards the AS or A-level grades. Practical work will be assessed in the written papers. 15% of the total A-level marks will be for practical knowledge and understanding. We have excellent equipment at King’s Ely in the department for carrying out the required practical work but certainly extend this so that students will be confident in this area. The course within King’s Ely All students enrolled will be assumed to be taking the full A-level. At a fixed point in the year they will be guided to making a decision whether or not it is appropriate to continue working towards the full A-level With no AS exam at the end of the lower sixth year, applications to university will need some evidence of empirical quality and we will be looking to enter the students into the Biology Olympiad to provide evidence for this. Business Studies (AQA) First year content includes the following topics: 1. What is business? 2. Managers, leadership and decision making. 3. Decision making to improve market performance. 4. Decision making to improve operational performance. 5. Decision making to improve financial performance. 6. Decision making to improve human resource performance. Second year content The A-level incorporates the same six topics as the first year, plus the following additional topics: 1. Analysing the strategic position of a business. 2. Choosing strategic direction. 3. Strategic methods: how to pursue strategies. 4. Managing strategic charge.

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Chemistry continued A-Level CHEMISTRY Paper 1 Inorganic Chemistry, with relevant Physical Chemistry Relevant practical skills Written exam: 2 hours 105 marks 35% of A-level CONTENT Paper 2 Organic Chemistry, with relevant Physical Chemistry Relevant practical skills Written exam: 2 hours 105 marks 35% of A-level Paper 3 All practical skills All content Chemistry continued With no AS exam at the end of the lower sixth year, applications to university will need some evidence of empirical quality and we will be looking to enter the students into Cambridge Chemistry Challenge and the Chemistry Olympiad to provide evidence for this. Prerequisite As 20% of the course has mathematical content – GCSE grade B for Double Award and ideally A grade at GCSE maths ASSESSMENT Written exam: 2 hours 90 marks 30% of A-level 40 marks: questions on practical techniques and data analysis 20 marks: testing across the specification 30 marks: multiple choice questions Classical Civilisation (OCR) Course: AS European culture has its fountainhead in the drama, literature and history of the Greek and Roman world. These texts written over two thousand years ago have so shaped any book or play we pick up today that we cannot say we understand our own culture until we have engaged with that of the Classical World. AS and A2 Classical Civilisation will enable you to explore key Classical texts in depth and, though studying their ancient context and themes, draw insights which you can apply to the world around us today. As well as visits to plays and museums in the UK, the department is also planning a trip Rome in the summer 2013. Title of Module Greek Tragedy in its Context Greek Historians Method of Assessment Written examination 1 hour 30 minutes. Written examination 1 hour 30 minutes. % of Marks 50 50 105 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions 105 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions The course is divided up into the traditional areas of Physical, Inorganic and Organic Chemistry. The topics in these areas in the course are: Physical: Atomic structure, Amount of substance, Bonding, Energetics, Kinetics, Chemistry equilibria Le chatelier’s principle. Inorganic: Periodicity, Group 2 the alkaline earth metals, Group 7(17) the halogens. Period 3 elements and their oxides, Transition metals, Reactions of ions in aqueous solution. Organic: Alkanes, Halogenoalkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols, Organic analysis. Optical isomerism, Aldehydes and ketones, Carboxylic acids and derivatives, Aromatic chemistry, Amines, Polymers, Amino acids, Proteins and DNA, Organic synthesis, Nmr spectroscopy, Chromatography. QUESTIONS AS and A-level Prerequisite: Evidence of an enjoyment of reading; an ability to write essays. You do not need to have studied Classical Civilisation at GCSE; the A-level course is different and stands alone. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required as the texts are studied in English. Classical Civilisation complements and illumines a wide variety of other subjects. Course: A2 Title of Module Virgil and the World of the Hero Comic Drama in the Ancient World Method of Assessment Written examination 2 hours. Written examination 2 hours. % of Marks 25 25 A-level only Thermodynamics, Rate equations, Equilibrium constant (kc) for homogeneous systems, Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells. The course within King’s Ely All students enrolled will be assumed to be taking the full A-level. At a fixed point in the year they will be guided to making a decision whether or not it is appropriate to continue working towards the full A-level.

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Computer Science (AQA) Computer Science is about what goes on inside the single most powerful tool of the world we live in. Science, technology, manufacturing, research, medicine – you name it, computer science influences and affects everything we do. There is a world out there just bursting with invention and opportunities and 90% of it is driven by computers. Studying Computer Science will help you develop a new range of skills from problem solving to information analysis and computational thinking. The new A-level course explores things like ‘What is a computer?’, ‘What is programming all about?’. How can a computer solve every day problems?’ and how to bridge the gap between the problem we are trying to solve and what the computer ‘understands’. You will learn how to program in a high level programming language as well as gain an understanding of low level languages including machine code. Assessment The two year A-level Computer Science course is assessed by three papers: two externally assessed and one internally assessed project. Paper 1 – this paper tests a student’s ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of Computer Science. Students answer a series of short questions and write/adapt/extend programs in an electronic answer document. Title of Module: Paper 1 Fundamentals of programming Fundamentals of data structures Fundamentals of algorithms Theory of computation Assessment method and % weighting 40% of A-level 2.5 hour on-screen examination Computer Science continued Title of Module: Paper 2 Fundamentals of data representation Fundamentals of computer systems Fundamentals of computer organization and architecture Consequences of uses of computing Fundamentals of communication and networking Fundamentals of databases Big Data Fundamentals of functional programming Description Fundamentals of data representation Number systems, number bases, binary, coding systems, representation of image and sound. Fundamentals of computing systems Hardware and software, classification of languages, translators, logic gates and Boolean algebra. Fundamentals of computer organization and architecture Internal components of a computer, the stored program concept, external hardware devices. Consequences of uses of computing The moral, ethical and cultural consequences. Fundamentals of communication and networking Network topologies, transmission protocols Fundamentals of databases Conceptual data models, normalization, SQL, client server databases. Big Data Fundamentals of functional programming Paradigms, list processing, problem solving. Assessment method and % weighting 40% of A-level 2.5 hour written examination Description Fundamentals of programming Features of imperative High Level Language programming practice which explores data types, procedures and functions, file handling, data structures and validation. Fundamentals of Data Structures Arrays, fields, records, trees, graphs, queues, stacks, lists, hashing, vectors. Fundamentals of Algorithms Searching, sorting, graph and tree traversal, optimization. Theory of Computation Abstraction and automation, regular languages, context free languages, models of computation, Turing machines. Paper 3 – Computing practical project. Title of Module: Paper 3 Computing practical project Assessment method and % weighting 20% of A-level Internally assessed and externally moderated by AQA Description Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving, demonstrating their skill to analyse, design, implement, test and evaluate a substantial computer based task undertaken over an extended period. Paper 2 – this paper tests a student’s ability to answer from the subject content and consists of compulsory short – answer and extended – answer questions.

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Design Technology (Edexcel) Product Design: Resistant Materials Technology (Edexcel) If you like solving problems, and designing and making products that are useful to you or someone else, you will enjoy this course enormously. It is highly practical, backed up by an in-depth study of materials and processes, including a broad understanding of how things are done in industry. A wide range of products can be designed and manufactured within the course that range from the highly artistic to scientific and engineered solutions. The focus of this course is the process of designing. You will learn how to identify, analyse and research problems, develop a brief and specification, generate and communicate your ideas, select and develop your design proposals and then manufacture them to create usable working products that can be tested and evaluated. You will use a wide range of materials and processes including hand tools, machines and CNC equipment. In addition, you will also complete a design folder that will typically include research and analysis, ideas, development, planning, evidence of making, evaluation and testing. (This will consist of 25-35 A3 sheets in a presentation folio.) Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1: Portfolio of Creative Skills Unit 2: Design & Technology in Practice Course: A2 Title of Module Unit 3: Designing for the Future Unit 4: Commercial Design Method of Assessment The assessment of this unit is through a 2 hour examination paper set and marked by Edexcel – 70 marks. Pupils are given the opportunity to apply the skills they have acquired and developed throughout this course of study, and to design and make a product of their choice which complies with the requirements of Resistant Materials technology. Internally assessed – 90 marks. % of Marks 20 Method of Assessment Pupils will produce a portfolio with three distinct sections, which will demonstrate their creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making product(s). Internally assessed – 90 marks. The assessment of this unit is through a 1 hour 30 minute examination paper set and marked by Edexcel – 70 marks. % of Marks 60 AS 30 A2 Design Technology (edexcel) continued Homework and Independent Study The recommended time you should spend on your homework is around 5 hours per week. Much of this time will be taken up with the production of your design portfolio, but there will be written assignments as well. The facilities of the Department can be used outside normal timetabled lessons and you will be encouraged to spend some of your study time in the Department. Prerequisite:  It is helpful but not necessary for candidates to have studied GCSE Design and Technology or Product Design before commencing work on this specification. Candidates need to show a genuine interest and skill in designing and making products from a range of materials. Food Technology (AQA) It is helpful but not necessary for candidates to have studied GCSE Design and Technology or Food and Nutrition before commencing work on this specification. AQA Design and Technology Food will give you the opportunity to study nutrition and design and making in the human context. Candidates take a broad view of design and technology, and food science and nutrition, to develop their capacity to design and make products and to appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing. For A2 Candidates will gain an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of Food Technology through a substantial piece of work based on developing a design solution from a product analysis. The AS specification has two units: Title of Module Food 1 Method of Assessment 2 hour written paper Based primarily on Materials and Components and consisting of three sections. Coursework Approx 50 hours of work. A written or electronic design portfolio. Can be either a single design and make project two smaller projects. % of Marks 50% of AS 25% of A-level 80 Marks 50% of AS 25% of A-level 50 hours of work 80 Marks 40 AS 20 A2 Food 2 25

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Design Technology (edexcel) continued A2 offered depending on numbers Title of Module Food 3 Method of Assessment Based primarily on Design and Manufacture Consisting of two sections. Candidates answer one question from each section plus a final question from either section. Coursework Approx 60 hours. A written or electronic design portfolio. Manufacturing outcome. A single substantial designing and making activity. % of Marks 25% of A-level 2 hour written paper 84 marks 25% of A-level 60 hours of work 85 marks Drama and Theatre Studies (AQA) continued Course A2 At A2 candidates are given the opportunity to develop skills and extend and apply knowledge gained at AS Level. Candidates will demonstrate a more advanced level of performance and or production skills alongside the ability to think independently, make judgments and refine their work in the light of research. They will also demonstrate the ability to analyse the ways in which different performance and production elements are brought together to create theatre. Title of Module Unit 3: Further Prescribed Plays including Pre-Twentieth Century Unit 4: Presentation of Devised Drama Method of Assessment % of Marks Food 4 Written paper 2 hours 30 Drama and Theatre Studies (AQA) Product Design: Resistant Materials Technology (Edexcel) Candidates will gain a knowledge and understanding of theatre practice through their own engagement with the medium as both participant and informed audience member. Candidates will develop performance and/or production skills appropriate to the creation and realisation of drama and theatre. Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1: Live Theatre Seen % Prescribed Play Unit 2: Presentation of an extract from a Play Method of Assessment Written examination 1 hour and 30 minutes. Internally assessed and externally moderated. Performance of an extract from a published play. The assessment also includes candidates preparatory and developmental work and supporting notes. % of Marks 60 Internally assessed and externally moderated. Performance by a group of devised drama. The assessment also includes candidates preparatory and developmental work and supporting notes. 20 Unit 3 Topic List:  Study of a set play with a choice and variety of pretwentieth century plays.  Study of a set play with a choice from a variety of twentieth century plays or contemporary drama. Unit 4 Topic List:  Working in groups to develop and present a devised drama, performed in a theatrical style of their choice.  Research into a theatrical style chosen by the group for their practical work. 40 Unit 1 Topic List:  Candidates’ personal response to live theatre seen during the course.  Interpretation of a set play from a performance perspective. Unit 2 Topic List:  Working in groups to develop and present an extract from a published play chosen by candidates.  Study of an influential director, designer, theatre company or other practitioner, linked to the candidate’s practical work.

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Economics (OCR) Take Economics at A-level if you are interested in the world around you, life and human nature and want to investigate how our Economic system works. Economics contains elements of the arts and sciences, so combines well with a wide range of other subjects. It can lead to professional qualifications in business and finance as well as to degree courses in Economics. The Economics specification gives a strong grounding in both microeconomics and macroeconomics, through a multi-component externally assessed qualification. The key purpose of this qualification is to provide an introduction to the study of Economics, with the content focusing on providing the basic knowledge and understanding of the essential aspects of economic theory and concepts. The aim is for the learners to learn how to ‘think as economists’, and be able to develop the necessary analytical, questioning and quantitative skills in order to progress in the subject, within relevant associated subjects or for use in their professional lives. Learners will develop various skill sets – from data analysis, problem solving and high tariff writing to independent learning, critical thinking and decision making – which can make them stand out as they progress to higher education and/or the workplace. Because it is topical – and because economists often disagree – it can also be controversial, and you are encouraged to keep up with current issues in the newspapers and on television. See also: Business Studies, if you are more interested in how businesses work. It is possible to take both subjects. Course: A-level Title of Module Microeconomics Macroeconomics Themes in economics Method of Assessment Written examination 2 hours. Written examination 2 hours. Written examination 2 hours. % of Marks 33.33 33.33 33.33 English Literature (edexcel) continued Students are also encouraged to take part in extra-curricular activities such as the production of school newspapers, magazines and competitions. Around eight texts are studied in the full two year course. Texts will be novels, plays and poems. At the time of going to press, the examination boards have not yet held the teacher training events at which the English Department makes its choice of syllabus. Common to all boards, however, is a wide range of texts: the novel, plays and poetry, written in various centuries ranging from Chaucer (14th century) to Mark Haddon (2012), and at least one play by Shakespeare. An essay-based system of assessment is also common to all boards. 20% of the marks for A-level are from coursework, the rest from written examination. A final decision on syllabus will be made in November 2014. Film Studies (OCR) The Film Studies course is designed to deepen students’ understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of film, the major art form of the twentieth century, and a cultural form still of great significance at the beginning of the new millennium. The course builds on the knowledge learners have developed informally since childhood. They will study cinema as a medium, as an art form and as a social and economic institution. They will also engage with a wide range of different kinds of films, developing skills of observation, critical analysis and personal reflection. There are opportunities for students to make a study of their personal choice of films and to use their creativity to develop materials which could be used in film production. Course: AS Title of Module Exploring Film Form British and American Film Course: A2 Title of Module Film Research and Creative Projects Varieties of Film Experience: Issues and Debates Method of Assessment Internally assessed. Written examination 2 hours 45 minutes. % of Marks 50 50 Method of Assessment Internally assessed. Written examination 2 hours 30 minutes. % of Marks 40 60 English Literature (OCR) You should study English A-level if you enjoy reading and would like to develop the kind of skills that English promotes, skills which the workplace rates: literacy, eloquence, independent thinking, the ability to shape and justify an argument in speech and in writing. In addition to the lessons you will have the opportunity to attend plays, talk to professional writers, attend pre-university seminars on set texts and discover links between English and other areas of the curriculum such as History, Art and Drama.

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French (AQA) Sixth Form French is an exciting challenge and incorporates language work with more cultural elements of the course such as French film, music and literature. All lessons are conducted in the target language. Moreover, students receive a oneto-one speaking lesson with a French native speaker and regular access to the state of the art digital language laboratory. The French Department organises a number of cultural events, the highlights of which is our Sixth Form Exchange visit with the prestigious Lycée Alphonse Daudet in Nimes. Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1 Unit 2 Prerequisite: Course: A2 You will develop a wider knowledge of vocabulary and linguistic structures and a deeper understanding of cultural aspects of Francophone countries. Practical communication in contemporary French is at the core of the syllabus. With a focus on in-depth study of a novel and a film, the course prepares you for a variety of French degree level courses based on language/literature, cinema and society. As well as lessons with a native speaker, there are French magazines and newspapers, satellite television, computer software, and an extensive DVD and media library to help you polish your everyday French, and to demonstrate how language usage varies in different contexts. Title of Module Unit 3 Unit 4 Method of Assessment Listening/Reading/Writing 2 hours 30 minutes. Speaking 35 minutes. % of Marks 35 15 Method of Assessment Listening/Reading/Writing 2 hours. Speaking 35 minutes. Good pass at French GCSE. % of Marks 70 of AS 35 of A2 30 of AS 15 of A2 Geography (AQA) continued residential fieldwork trip to Snowdonia. As Geography can be considered an Art and a Science, it has the potential to lead to a vast range of higher education and career opportunities. Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1: Physical and Human Geography Unit 2: Applied Geography Prerequisite: Course: A2 Title of Module Unit 3: Contemporary Geographical Issues Unit 4: Fieldwork Method of Assessment Resource-based questions and essay. Written unit. % of Marks 30 20 Method of Assessment Stimulus response + extended prose. Structured skills + research/fieldwork. % of Marks 70 of AS 35 of A2 30 of AS 15 of A2 A good GCSE pass if Geography has been taken at GCSE. German (AQA) With the biggest economy in Europe, Germany is leading the way in the European Union and in the fields of engineering, economics and design. Coupled with a magnificent cultural heritage, learning German in the Sixth Form is exciting and more relevant than ever. The course incorporates language work with more cultural elements of the course such as German film, music and literature. Satellite TV, CD ROM and DVD are just some of the modern teaching methods we employ. All lessons are conducted in the language and students have regular access to the state of the art digital language laboratory. Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1 Unit 2 Prerequisite: Method of Assessment Listening/Reading/Writing 2 hours. Speaking 35 minutes. Good pass at French GCSE. % of Marks 70 of AS 35 of A2 30 of AS 15 of A2 Geography (AQA) The subject content is divided equally between Natural and Human Environments, studying the relationships which exist between people and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of skills as well as knowledge. The teaching focuses on an enquiry-based approach in which students are encouraged to be inquisitive and explore a range of questions and issues. Theoretical situations are tested in practice through on- going fieldwork investigations and a

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German continued Course: A2 You will develop a wider knowledge of vocabulary and linguistic structures and a deeper understanding of cultural aspects of German-speaking countries. Practical communication in contemporary German is at the core of the syllabus. The course prepares you for a variety of German degree level courses based on language/ literature film and society. As well as lessons with a native speaker, there are German magazines and newspapers, satellite television, computer software, and an extensive DVD and media library to help you polish your everyday German, and to demonstrate how language usage varies in different contexts. Title of Module Unit 3 Unit 4 Method of Assessment Listening/Reading/Writing 2 hours 30 minutes. Speaking 35 minutes. % of Marks 32 15 History (TBC) Medieval and Modern History: The study of History will provide the individual with a better understanding of today’s society by examining the past. Not only that, it will develop a range of skills that are vital in both higher education and the workplace. At this level students will engage in evidence based debates, the analysis and evaluation of a variety of sources and seminar style presentations. The specification offers us the opportunity to engage with some fascinating topics and should be enough to whet the appetite of anyone interested in History. Due to national A-level reform in History across all of the exam boards, the department is unable to yet commit to a specific board for 2015 until the new specifications have been approved by Ofqual. This is an exciting time for History departments across the country as it allows us to fully review what we do. Given the excellent resources we have in the department, and especially in the School Library, it is most likely that we will continue to follow a Medieval and Modern option. All exam boards, based on the recommendations of universities, will include an extended coursework option; this will give students a firm grounding in research, analysing evidence and writing at length. Course: A-level Title of Module Unit 1: The crusades c.1095-1204 Unit 2: England and the Angevin Empire in the reign of Henry II, 1154-89 Unit 3: The British Experience of Warfare, c.1790-1918 Unit 4: Coursework Prerequisite: Although students need to have studied History at GCSE level it would be expected that potential candidates would have at least B grades in Humanities related subjects e.g: Geography, RS, History. Method of Assessment Written examination 2 hours 15 minutes. Written examination 1 hour 15 minutes. Written examination 2 hours 15 minutes. Internally assessed assignment of 3,500 words % of Marks A-level: 30 Government and Politics (Edexcel) AS and A2 Course Whether we like it or not politics is unavoidable: no matter our age the government of the day is making policies that will affect us both in the short-term and long-term. Politics is how we can manage the conflicts and disagreements that arise through differing group interests and views often centred on these decisions. At King’s we hope to develop students’ knowledge of current political affairs whilst exploring the dynamic nature of political parties and their ideologies. The course aims to develop the research and communication skills needed to make coherent arguments and reach balanced conclusions. Title of Module Unit 1: People and Politics Level AS Assessment Information Written examination 1 hr 20 minutes. Two structured questions from a choice of 4. Each question has a mark tariff of 5/10/25 marks. Written examination 1 hr 20 minutes. One stimulus question from two. One extended question from two. Written examination 1 hr 30 minutes. Three questions from five. One essay question from three. Written examination 1 hr 30 minutes. Three questions from five. One essay question from three. A-level: 20 A-level: 30 A-level: 20 Unit 2: Governing the UK Unit 3: Key Themes in Political Analysis UK Political Issues Unit 4: Extended Themes in Political Analysis Global Political Issues AS A2 A2

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Latin (OCR) Course: AS Latin is not a ‘dead’ language. The study of its language and literature is fascinating and rewarding in its own right, but Latin is alive beneath the surface of the modern world. The influence of Latin is as widespread today as the Roman Empire was dominant in the ancient world: almost 80% of English words derive from Latin; French and Spanish, and the other Romance languages, owe their existence to Latin; world literature and film still turn to classical writers for inspiration. The Roman world has in many important ways shaped the institutions, languages and ways of thought of Europe and the West. This course gives you the opportunity to study aspects of the language and literature of the Classical world, exploring the cultural, political and social life of Rome at significant periods in its history. You will develop your understanding of language structures in Classical Latin, you will begin to appreciate the beauty of this ancient language and you will read and respond to a selection of Latin literature in the original, considering the spiritual, moral and cultural issues that emerge from the reading. Prerequisite: Title of Module Latin Language A good grade in Latin at GCSE Method of Assessment Written examination 1 hour 30 minutes. % of Marks 50 50 Mathematics (OCR) The benefits of an A-level in mathematics are well known. Universities and employers appreciate the logical thinking and presentation skills that you learn and a recent article in The Times newspaper pointed out that people with Maths A-level earn more than those with other A-levels. It also has a place as a ‘service subject’ in that people who go on and study sciences, economics, geography and psychology often find A-level Maths to be very useful. Course: AS C1 Core 1.  The first of the pure maths modules builds on and recaps the harder ideas from GCSE such as surds, quadratics and polynomials. It also introduces differentiation. C2 Core 2  The second pure module brings in integration, logarithms, and trigonometry. M1 Mechanics 1  An applied maths module looks at concepts such as forces, velocity, acceleration etc. that you may be familiar with from physics. Course: A2 C3 Core 3  The third pure module develops a formal understanding of functions and develops the differentiation further. C4 Core 4  The final pure module has integration as its main focus but also looks at parametric equations and vectors. S1 Probability This applied maths module builds on the statistics content and Statistics 1  from GCSE maths. All units count for 16.7% of the whole A-level and are each assessed by a 90 minute written paper. There is no coursework. Further  Students are also able to opt for Further Mathematics on Mathematics: top of their A-level ‘single’ maths course. The course is very flexible and usually consists of three more pure maths units introducing such topics as matrices, complex numbers and group theory, and three further applied units. Students wanting to do a degree in maths at any of the better universities should consider this course, as should those considering natural sciences or engineering at Oxbridge or Imperial. Latin Verse and Prose Literature (currently Written examination 1 hour 30 minutes. Cicero and Ovid) See also: Course: A2  lassical Civilisation, History, English, Religious Studies, C Modern Languages. The A2 course offers the chance to read in more depth the literature of the Roman world, increasing your ability to understand and respond to the different styles and agenda of a greater range of authors. Your grasp of structures, vocabulary and idiom will be extended, and you will have the option, if you have the talent for it, to write compositions in Latin. Your exploration of cultural, social and spiritual issues connected with your reading will become more sophisticated, and you will gain a developing awareness of the impact of Latin and Rome on later literature, language and culture, and on the modern world in general. Pupils studying Latin are included in any suitable excursions undertaken by Classical Civilisation. Title of Module Latin Verse, divided into Prescribed Literature (currently Virgil) and Language Latin Prose, divided into Prescribed Literature (Currently Tacitus) and Language) Method of Assessment Written examination 2 hours. Written examination 2 hours. % of Marks 25 25

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Music (OCR) There are three AS units and three A2 units representing the three major activities involved in this qualification: Performing, Composing and Listening/Analysing. • • •  erforming is assessed by visiting examination through recital and a short P viva voce.  omposing is assessed through a centre marked portfolio (part of which is C compiled under controlled conditions) which is externally moderated.  istening/Analysing is assessed by an externally set and marked L examination. Course: AS Title of Module Method of Assessment Section A Solo Recital Section B Viva voce: discussion Section C Extended Performing, one of: • Performing on a second instrument • Further performance on the Recital instrument in an ensemble or duet or as an accompaniment • Performing own composition • Improvisation. Section A The Language of Western Tonal Harmony: exercises Section B Instrumental composition. Timed Examination Paper Section A Aural Extract: from the period 1700 to 1830 or popular instrumental music from 1900 to the present day Section B Prescribed Works: two extracts • 18th /early 19th Century Orchestra • Jazz 1920 to 1960 Section C Contextual Study: one essay from three. % of Marks Unit G351: Performing Music 1 120 marks OCR assessed examination (visiting examiner) 40% (AS) 20% (A2) Teacher assessed portfolio 30% (AS) 15% (A2) Unit G352: Composing 1 90 marks Unit G353: Introduction to Historical Study in Music 90 marks 30% (AS) 15% (A2)

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Music continued Course: A2 Title of Module Unit G354: Performing Music 2: (Interpretation) 120 marks Method of Assessment Section A Recital: Solo, ensemble or accompanying Section B Viva voce: Interpretative understanding. % of Marks OCR assessed examination (visiting examiner) 20% Music Technology (Edexcel) The majority of music produced today is brought to the listener via technology and the Music Technology course is aimed equally at musicians who wish to use technology to realise traditional music and those who wish to exploit its potential for realising new music. Prerequisite: GCSE Music (if taken) and basic piano / keyboard skills. Unit G355: Composing 2 90 marks Section A Stylistic Techniques: exercises from one of: two-part counterpoint of the late 16th Century; two-part Baroque counterpoint; chorale harmonisations in the style of JS Bach; string quartets in the Classical style; keyboard accompaniments in early Romantic style; popular song; serialism; minimalism Section B Composition: one of vocal setting of a text; instrumental interpretation of a programme; music for Film/TV. Timed Examination Paper Section A: Aural extract: accompanied vocal music 1900 to 1945 Section B: Prescribed Topics: two questions from three on one of the six topics: • Song • Programme music • Music for screen • Music and Belief • Music for the stage • Post 1945 Popular Music. In this course you will learn the skills to produce high-quality recordings of a range of musical performances; produce accomplished musical performances in a range of musical styles using sequencing software and study the developments of music technology, especially focusing on the changes in recording techniques. Course: AS Title of Module % of Marks Externally assessed coursework 35 Externally assessed written examination 15 Course: A2 Title of Module Unit 3: One sequenced integrated performance One multi-track recording One composition Logbook. % of Marks Externally assessed coursework 30 Externally assessed written examination 20 Teacher assessed portfolio 15% Unit 1: One sequenced performance One multitrack recording One arrangement Logbook. Unit 2: Listening and Analysing 1 hour 45 minutes examination. Unit G356: Historical and Analytical Studies in Music 90 marks 15% Unit 4: Analysing and Producing 2 hour examination.

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Philosophy of Religion and Ethics – RS (Edexcel) ‘The unexamined life is not worth living’ – Socrates The course comprises two parts: Philosophy of Religion and Ethics (Moral Philosophy). Philosophy involves a critical examination of our most fundamental beliefs about truth and reality, right and wrong. It challenges many of our assumptions about what we know and how we should live. It is a discipline concerned with how different views of the world clash or fit together, and with how far different perspectives (moral, scientific, religious, metaphysical, personal) may be reconciled. Philosophy is concerned with epistemology (theories of knowledge); it is therefore an inter-disciplinary subject and will complement both Art and Science A-Levels. Many students go on to read Philosophy, Politics, Economics, languages or indeed any other Arts degree courses such as Law. It is, however, a challenging fourth AS for those whose interests lie within the Sciences. The Ethics component makes it an excellent choice for those wishing to pursue a career in Medicine or the Bio-Sciences. Prerequisite: Course: AS Title of Module Investigations Foundations (Philosophy of Religion and Ethics) Course: A2 Title of Module Developments (Philosophy of Religion and Ethics) Implications (Philosophy of Religion or Ethics) Method of Assessment Examination 1 hour 45 minutes. Examination 1 hour 15 minutes. % of Marks 50 50 Method of Assessment Written examination 1 hour 15 minutes. Examination 1 hour 45 minutes. % of Marks 50 50 A love of ideas and an ability to write essays. Physical Education (AQA) The Physical Education course allows the student to focus on a single activity throughout the course. The student will experience and develop an interest in a variety of roles such as performer, official and coach, enhance their previous knowledge and increase their understanding of the modern day sporting arena. They will also evaluate and discuss current developments in sport such as the impact of new technology, sport-specific rehabilitation and use of ergogenic aids. Course: AS Title of Module Unit 1: Opportunity for and the effects of leading a healthy and active lifestyle Unit 2: Analysis and evaluation of physical activity as performer and/ or in an adopted role/s Course: A2 Title of Module Unit 3: Optimising performance and evaluating contemporary issues within sport Unit 4: Optimising practical performance in a competitive situation Method of Assessment Written paper 2 hours. % of Marks Method of Assessment Written paper: 2 hours. % of Marks 60% of AS marks 30% of A-level marks Practical assessment. 40% of AS marks 20% of A-level marks 30% of A-level marks Practical assessment. 20% of A-level marks

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